Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSeymour Cassel
IN THE NEWS

Seymour Cassel

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Anyone seeking an empty-headed, derivative joy ride through crime-comedy conventions could do far worse than "Silver Case," a brisk, good-looking and never dull B movie. With a game cast playing stock types - among them Eric Roberts and Seymour Cassel and their patented brand of twinkling menace - the gleefully pointless genre outing will be a calling card for first-time director Christian Filippella. The title Maguffin begins its preposterous journey in Italy and lands in Los Angeles for a handover to an iffy courier (Alejandro Cardenas)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Anyone seeking an empty-headed, derivative joy ride through crime-comedy conventions could do far worse than "Silver Case," a brisk, good-looking and never dull B movie. With a game cast playing stock types - among them Eric Roberts and Seymour Cassel and their patented brand of twinkling menace - the gleefully pointless genre outing will be a calling card for first-time director Christian Filippella. The title Maguffin begins its preposterous journey in Italy and lands in Los Angeles for a handover to an iffy courier (Alejandro Cardenas)
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 12, 2007 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
He's played hustlers, gangsters, an aging hippie and a deaf mute. Now, Seymour Cassel is auditioning for what could be his toughest role yet: president of Hollywood's most powerful union, the Screen Actors Guild. A character actor whose career was nearly derailed more than two decades ago by a little-known stint in federal prison, Cassel has launched an unexpectedly strong challenge to incumbent Alan Rosenberg leading up to the Sept. 20 election.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2011
BOOKS James Gleick: "Are We Drowning in Information?" The acclaimed science and technology writer follows up the publication of his most ambitious project yet, "The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood," with a public discussion on how we got to an age of bits and bytes and where we go as the flood of information reaches near-biblical proportions. Petersen Automotive Museum , 6060 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 7:30 p.m. Free (RSVP online). (213) 381-2541. http://www.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Meeting with actor Seymour Cassel in a Santa Monica restaurant, it's easy to see why director Alexandre Rockwell wrote the lead in his film "In the Soup" for him. Cassel's larger-than-life personality is not unlike that of the fictional Joe, a wildly eccentric small-time hood who distracts the people he's conning by smothering them with kisses and doing the cha-cha.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | John M. Wilson \f7
He was nominated for an Oscar--best supporting actor for "Faces"--in 1968. He made a bigger splash in '71, starring as a free-spirited parking attendant in "Minnie and Moskowitz" (both films directed by the late John Cassavetes). But by the late '70s, Seymour Cassel admits, he had a "compulsive" taste for alcohol and drugs and "got carried away with the wrong people."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2011
BOOKS James Gleick: "Are We Drowning in Information?" The acclaimed science and technology writer follows up the publication of his most ambitious project yet, "The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood," with a public discussion on how we got to an age of bits and bytes and where we go as the flood of information reaches near-biblical proportions. Petersen Automotive Museum , 6060 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 7:30 p.m. Free (RSVP online). (213) 381-2541. http://www.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2009 | Mark Olsen
Actor Seymour Cassel had just tucked himself into a booth at Hollywood's venerable Musso & Frank Grill when he was reminded of an interview he did in the same spot for Rolling Stone magazine in 1972, alongside John Cassavetes, the iconic filmmaker with whom he is most closely associated. Like the restaurant, Cassel, now 74, may be older but seems remarkably unchanged. His unpredictable, live-wire energy, such a trademark from his roles for Cassavetes, was going full throttle. Cassel, who came to Hollywood in 1961, has a way with an anecdote and can drop some pretty impressive names -- there was the time, for example, when he introduced Charles Bukowski to Johnny Cash at Barney's Beanery -- and he manages to make it all sound plausible.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988
. . . Last week we reported that Sean Penn and Seymour Cassel would co-direct "She's Da Lovely" (from a script by John Cassavetes). Not so, said Penn, who called to explain that if the project goes--"This is something that's still in negotiation"--he'll be sole director. OK, you guys argue it out! . . . New York Post headline on its obituary on Enquirer founder Generoso Pope Jr.: National Enquirer Owner Goes to Meet with Elvis . . . .
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
Temistocles Lopez's erotic 1992 updating of "La Ronde" to contemporary Manhattan is witty, wise and elegant. The film's ironic device, with one lover moving on to the next, who in turn moves on to another until the last lover connects with the first, allows Lopez to show how sexual longing and emotional craving in all their permutations reveal the loneliness and isolation existing in modern life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2009 | Mark Olsen
Actor Seymour Cassel had just tucked himself into a booth at Hollywood's venerable Musso & Frank Grill when he was reminded of an interview he did in the same spot for Rolling Stone magazine in 1972, alongside John Cassavetes, the iconic filmmaker with whom he is most closely associated. Like the restaurant, Cassel, now 74, may be older but seems remarkably unchanged. His unpredictable, live-wire energy, such a trademark from his roles for Cassavetes, was going full throttle. Cassel, who came to Hollywood in 1961, has a way with an anecdote and can drop some pretty impressive names -- there was the time, for example, when he introduced Charles Bukowski to Johnny Cash at Barney's Beanery -- and he manages to make it all sound plausible.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2007 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
He's played hustlers, gangsters, an aging hippie and a deaf mute. Now, Seymour Cassel is auditioning for what could be his toughest role yet: president of Hollywood's most powerful union, the Screen Actors Guild. A character actor whose career was nearly derailed more than two decades ago by a little-known stint in federal prison, Cassel has launched an unexpectedly strong challenge to incumbent Alan Rosenberg leading up to the Sept. 20 election.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Meeting with actor Seymour Cassel in a Santa Monica restaurant, it's easy to see why director Alexandre Rockwell wrote the lead in his film "In the Soup" for him. Cassel's larger-than-life personality is not unlike that of the fictional Joe, a wildly eccentric small-time hood who distracts the people he's conning by smothering them with kisses and doing the cha-cha.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | John M. Wilson \f7
He was nominated for an Oscar--best supporting actor for "Faces"--in 1968. He made a bigger splash in '71, starring as a free-spirited parking attendant in "Minnie and Moskowitz" (both films directed by the late John Cassavetes). But by the late '70s, Seymour Cassel admits, he had a "compulsive" taste for alcohol and drugs and "got carried away with the wrong people."
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
Writer-director James B. Harris' 1993 film noir was originally--and more appropriately--called "Money Man," the title of the Gerald Petievich novel on which it is based. It's a stylish, deliberately B-scale movie that boasts an ensemble Grade A cast that emphasizes character over action. Wesley Snipes' U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|