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Seymour Cray

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NEWS
October 6, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seymour Cray, a legendary engineer and entrepreneur who for more then three decades built the world's fastest computers, died Saturday at age 71. Cray succumbed to the severe head and neck injuries he suffered in a Sept. 22 traffic accident near his Colorado Springs home. Widely known as the father of the supercomputer, Cray co-founded Control Data Corp. in the mid-1950s, and later launched Cray Research Inc. and then Cray Computer Inc.
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NEWS
October 6, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seymour Cray, a legendary engineer and entrepreneur who for more then three decades built the world's fastest computers, died Saturday at age 71. Cray succumbed to the severe head and neck injuries he suffered in a Sept. 22 traffic accident near his Colorado Springs home. Widely known as the father of the supercomputer, Cray co-founded Control Data Corp. in the mid-1950s, and later launched Cray Research Inc. and then Cray Computer Inc.
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BUSINESS
June 4, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
The story goes that Seymour Cray builds a new sailboat for himself by hand every year. But at the end of each summer, Cray burns the boat to the ground. He does so, those who know him say, because he doesn't want to become a prisoner of his old boat design. He wants to start with a blank sheet of paper the following year. For Seymour Cray, the 63-year-old father of the supercomputer and the founder of Cray Research, that story is an allegory for his life's work. Throughout his long and legendary career--which roughly parallels the history of the computer--Cray has always been obsessed with building the world's fastest computers.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legendary computer designer Seymour Cray, the father of the supercomputer and long one of the world's most daring and inventive technologists, clung to life Monday at a Colorado Springs, Colo., hospital after a traffic accident left him with a broken neck and massive head injuries. Kate Brewster, a spokeswoman for Penrose Hospital, said Cray, 70, was in critical and unstable condition after surgery was performed Sunday to relieve pressure on his brain caused by swelling.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1992
Cray Computer Corp., a struggling supercomputer maker, announced that Neil Davenport resigned on Thursday as president and chief executive to "explore other opportunities." Seymour Cray, chairman, will assume the duties of acting president and CEO for the time being. Cray Computer is engaged in the design and development of the Cray-3 computer system.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seymour Cray Faces Charges in SEC Investigation: The supercomputing industry pioneer is expected to be charged in an insider trading case, according to a regulatory disclosure made by Cray Computer Corp. Colorado Springs, Colo.-based Cray Computer, where founder Cray is still chairman, also faces Securities and Exchange Commission allegations, as do President Terry Willkom and Vice President Michael Hammerton.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Why did Seymour Cray leave Cray Research, the Minneapolis supercomputer company he founded 17 years ago, to form yet another supercomputer firm? Some analysts have surmised that engineering genius Cray wanted to escape Wall Street's fixation on quarterly financial reports. Others, including Cray Research officials, have said the company lacked the financial strength to support two rival supercomputer designs. But both explanations are off the mark, says Cray Research Chairman John Rollwagen, in his first detailed explanation of the breakup announced last month.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legendary computer designer Seymour Cray's attempt to revolutionize the way that the world's most powerful computers are built received a stunning setback Monday when the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory canceled a $30-million order for the first Cray-3 computer from Cray Computer Corp. Although the finished system was not scheduled for delivery until 1992, Lawrence Livermore said in a statement that because Cray Computer had missed a Dec.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is perhaps the coda to the career of one of America's most brilliant inventors, Cray Computer Corp., the third company to be started by famed supercomputer designer Seymour Cray, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Friday. Founded in 1989 after Cray resigned from one of his earlier companies, Cray Research Inc., Cray Computer spent more than $200 million trying to build and market an innovative computer many times more powerful than anything that existed before.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1989 | From Reuters
Cray Research Inc., the big supercomputer company struggling with high development costs, said Monday that it would restructure into two companies, putting its founder at the helm of a new entity that will focus on bringing one key computer, the CRAY-3, to market. The new company will be called Cray Computer Corp. and will be formed around CRAY-3 operations based in Colorado Springs, Colo., where the company has about 200 employees out of a worldwide force of 5,400. CRAY-3 is the company's most powerful supercomputer, but its development costs have been staggering, running to an estimated $50 million to date.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is perhaps the coda to the career of one of America's most brilliant inventors, Cray Computer Corp., the third company to be started by famed supercomputer designer Seymour Cray, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Friday. Founded in 1989 after Cray resigned from one of his earlier companies, Cray Research Inc., Cray Computer spent more than $200 million trying to build and market an innovative computer many times more powerful than anything that existed before.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seymour Cray Faces Charges in SEC Investigation: The supercomputing industry pioneer is expected to be charged in an insider trading case, according to a regulatory disclosure made by Cray Computer Corp. Colorado Springs, Colo.-based Cray Computer, where founder Cray is still chairman, also faces Securities and Exchange Commission allegations, as do President Terry Willkom and Vice President Michael Hammerton.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The world's most advanced supercomputer, now undergoing a test at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., represents a triumph of technological vision and entrepreneurial daring. But it may not represent a commercial triumph. And thereby hangs a tale of a man and his vision, but also of the fast-changing marketplace in supercomputers and every other business today.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1992
Cray Computer Corp., a struggling supercomputer maker, announced that Neil Davenport resigned on Thursday as president and chief executive to "explore other opportunities." Seymour Cray, chairman, will assume the duties of acting president and CEO for the time being. Cray Computer is engaged in the design and development of the Cray-3 computer system.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legendary computer designer Seymour Cray's attempt to revolutionize the way that the world's most powerful computers are built received a stunning setback Monday when the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory canceled a $30-million order for the first Cray-3 computer from Cray Computer Corp. Although the finished system was not scheduled for delivery until 1992, Lawrence Livermore said in a statement that because Cray Computer had missed a Dec.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
A highlight for many visitors to Apple Computer's headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., is a tour of the company's supercomputer center. There, coiled in a semicircle and encased in glass at the end of a hall checkerboarded in black and white tiles, stands Apple's bright purple Cray supercomputer. Given its hue and sleek art-Deco surroundings, it's no wonder critics once questioned whether Apple bought the $14.5-million machine to attract attention or to do serious work. "In the beginning, people didn't think we needed that much computing power to design personal computers," recalls Kent Koeninger, who helps Apple engineers use the Cray machine.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The world's most advanced supercomputer, now undergoing a test at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., represents a triumph of technological vision and entrepreneurial daring. But it may not represent a commercial triumph. And thereby hangs a tale of a man and his vision, but also of the fast-changing marketplace in supercomputers and every other business today.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Why did Seymour Cray leave Cray Research, the Minneapolis supercomputer company he founded 17 years ago, to form yet another supercomputer firm? Some analysts have surmised that engineering genius Cray wanted to escape Wall Street's fixation on quarterly financial reports. Others, including Cray Research officials, have said the company lacked the financial strength to support two rival supercomputer designs. But both explanations are off the mark, says Cray Research Chairman John Rollwagen, in his first detailed explanation of the breakup announced last month.
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