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Seymour Papert

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NEWS
February 23, 1997 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tired of hearing the hype about the computer revolution? Then listen to Seymour Papert, professor of math and chairman of learning research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who believes the future of the computer revolution has been underestimated by too many "experts" who view today's primitive models as the final product.
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NEWS
February 23, 1997 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tired of hearing the hype about the computer revolution? Then listen to Seymour Papert, professor of math and chairman of learning research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who believes the future of the computer revolution has been underestimated by too many "experts" who view today's primitive models as the final product.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 1995 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is coordinator of the 21st Century Project at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. His e-mail address is Gary.Chapman @mail.utexas.edu
For a wide range of policy-makers, educators and well-meaning technology vendors, the idea of connecting the nation's schools to the Internet has a great deal of appeal. President Clinton even jumped on the bandwagon with a speech in San Francisco last month in which he challenged "business and industry and local government throughout our country to make a commitment of time and resources so that by the year 2000, every classroom in America will be connected."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1993 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, Richard Kahlenberg of North Hollywood writes regularly for The Times
Bruce Green is a Valley boy to his core: a product of Erwin Street Elementary, Millikan Junior High, Grant High School, Cal State Northridge. Now, after a few adventures on the East Coast, including a stint at Columbia University Teacher's College, Green is a program designer for a top Boston publisher of educational software. Within the trade, his programs consistently win prizes for effectiveness. He is part of a very important trend.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rockett Movado is a self-assured eighth-grader at Whistling Pines Junior High. The spunky redhead who loves art and photography possesses an aura of creativity and independence that suggests she would succeed in whatever career she chooses. That is, unless she wants to write software for girls. That particular line of business has proved to be singularly difficult for nearly every company that has tried it, including Rockett's creator, Purple Moon. The Mountain View, Calif.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | MOLLY SELVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two young brothers cruise the aisles of the Toys R Us in Culver City, whipping past the G.I. Joes and trolls, the Ninja Turtles and X-Men to the stacks of Lego sets. "Awesome," exclaims the older boy as he climbs up the shelves to grab a set featuring medieval knights and a glow-in-the-dark ghost. "We should really get that one," he says. "Let's go ask Mom." If she's in a spending mood, Mom probably will probably succumb.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nintendo Co., the computer-game maker whose ubiquitous machines have penetrated one in five American homes, announced Tuesday a strategic tie to a leading U.S. research institution to probe the future of child learning, artificial intelligence and information media. Nintendo President Hiroshi Yamauchi said the company will contribute $3 million over five years to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Laboratory, specifically to support studies of how children learn while at play.
MAGAZINE
March 14, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Michael A. Hiltzik is a Times staff writer who covers business and technology
Come, journey back three decades, to a time before the Internet and laptops and disc drives--back to the moment when a major corporation established a legendary incubator for a new technology, and the personal computer was born. As the 1970s opened, Xerox Corp. was coming face to face with both triumph and adversity. Triumph because its standard-bearing product, the Model 914 office copier, was generating a cascade of cash as befit the most successful commercial product in history.
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