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BUSINESS
May 2, 1995
Market trends: Tele-Communications Inc. was the volume leader in Monday trading. Savoy Pictures Entertainment Inc.'s SF Broadcasting unit completed the purchase of WLUK of Green Bay, Wis., from Burnham Broadcasting Co.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
In an effort to speed government clearance and deflate objections to its proposed purchase of TV stations, SF Broadcasting has changed its corporate structure. But NBC said it will continue to challenge the deals. SF Broadcasting, owned by Savoy Pictures Entertainment Inc. and News Corp.'s Fox Television Stations Inc., had formed limited liability companies to buy TV stations in Green Bay, Wis., and three other cities. It planned to make them affiliates of the Fox TV network.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Indianapolis-based radio station owner Emmis Broadcasting Corp. has agreed to pay $307 million in cash and stock to buy four television stations from New York-based SF Broadcasting, which is owned 50-50 by USA Networks Inc. and News Corp.'s Fox. The stations are in Honolulu; New Orleans; Mobile, Ala.; and Green Bay, Wis. In a separate deal, Emmis will buy two stations from privately held Wabash Valley Broadcasting, also based in Indianapolis, for $90 million.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1995
Ira Deutchman abruptly left Monday as president of Fine Line Features, the upscale movie division of New Line Cinema, as part of a larger reorganization in which the unit will lose some of its autonomy. Details were sketchy late Monday, though a company announcement said Deutchman will have a two-year production and development deal with the company. Under Deutchman, Fine Line has released such critically acclaimed films as "The Player," "Barcelona" and "Hoop Dreams."
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the war between NBC and Fox being waged on the battleground of the Federal Communications Commission, the first impact is likely to be a chilling effect on Fox's plans to purchase TV stations around the country. NBC has challenged Fox's planned acquisition of two Fox affiliates, WFXT-TV in Boston and WTXF-TV in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1994 | ALAN CITRON and KATHRYN HARRIS
Now that Time Warner appears to have the inside track in discussions over General Electric's NBC, a minority deal may be the only way to keep federal regulators from the bargaining table. Knowledgeable sources say that Time Warner could successfully skirt rules that prohibit cross-ownership of broadcast and cable properties by acquiring only 49% of NBC. That may explain why the media giant remains in serious discussions after Walt Disney Co.
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