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Shaanxi

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WORLD
March 18, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Like many peasants from the outskirts of Yanan, China, Ren Shouhua was born in a cave and lived there until he got a job in the city and moved into a concrete-block house. His progression made sense as he strove to improve his life. But there's a twist: The 46-year-old Ren plans to move back to a cave when he retires. "It's cool in the summer and warm in the winter. It's quiet and safe," said Ren, a ruddy-faced man with salt-and-pepper hair who moved to the Shaanxi provincial capital, Xian, in his 20s. "When I get old, I'd like to go back to my roots.
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SCIENCE
November 12, 2012 | By Monte Morin
Already endangered by deforestation, poor reproductive rates and hunting, China's giant pandas may now face a new threat: global warming. According to a study published online Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, rising temperatures could eliminate much of the bamboo that pandas rely on for sustenance in China's Qinling Mountains. In the wild, giant pandas are notoriously finicky eaters. Ninety-nine percent of their diet consists of bamboo, and in the Qinling Mountains region, in Shaanxi province, pandas eat only three species of the plant.
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NEWS
May 26, 1986 | Associated Press
Archeologists have unearthed more than 200 relics in the last two weeks from the 2,600-year-old tomb of a Chin state duke in Shaanxi province, the People's Daily reported Sunday. The tomb of the Duke of Jin in Fengxiang county is the largest burial chamber found in China this century. The overseas edition of the official newspaper said that all the artifacts found are valuable and include gold, jade and bronze objects, pottery and lacquer.
WORLD
March 18, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Like many peasants from the outskirts of Yanan, China, Ren Shouhua was born in a cave and lived there until he got a job in the city and moved into a concrete-block house. His progression made sense as he strove to improve his life. But there's a twist: The 46-year-old Ren plans to move back to a cave when he retires. "It's cool in the summer and warm in the winter. It's quiet and safe," said Ren, a ruddy-faced man with salt-and-pepper hair who moved to the Shaanxi provincial capital, Xian, in his 20s. "When I get old, I'd like to go back to my roots.
SCIENCE
November 12, 2012 | By Monte Morin
Already endangered by deforestation, poor reproductive rates and hunting, China's giant pandas may now face a new threat: global warming. According to a study published online Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, rising temperatures could eliminate much of the bamboo that pandas rely on for sustenance in China's Qinling Mountains. In the wild, giant pandas are notoriously finicky eaters. Ninety-nine percent of their diet consists of bamboo, and in the Qinling Mountains region, in Shaanxi province, pandas eat only three species of the plant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
People who travel widely and are drawn to exhibitions of ancient art sometimes get the impression that an entire layer of civilization lies under the crust of earth we stand on. For those who survey a map of China in the catalogue for "The Quest for Eternity: Chinese Ceramic Sculpture From the People's Republic of China," at the County Museum of Art (through Jan. 3), the impression may solidify into a conviction.
WORLD
December 7, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
If pandas weren't so darn cute, we wouldn't be up in the clouds at the edge of a mountain ravine slick with moss and mud, clinging for life to shoots of bamboo. And get this: There is almost zero chance that we'll actually see a panda. We keep our eyes on the ground, not just to keep from falling, but because the best we can hope for is to discover panda droppings (and even the chances of that aren't so hot). "To be honest, I've been working in these mountains for 20 years and I've never seen a panda in the wild," says Dai Bo, 43, a wildlife biologist with China's Forestry Ministry who's wearing a camouflage jacket and hiking boots and has a zoom-lens Canon around his neck, just in case.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
When the earth shook off the coast of Japan on Friday, the magnitude 8.9 quake became the fifth strongest since 1900. According to records kept by the U.S. Geological Survey's Earthquake Information Center, the largest quake remains the one in Chile in 1960 that measured 9.5. That was followed by the 1964 quake in Prince William Sound, Alaska, at 9.2; the 2004 quake off of Sumatra, at 9.1; and the 1952 quake in Kamchatka, a peninsula in eastern Russia...
WORLD
June 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
Rescuers have all but given up hope of finding about 300 people missing in floods in western China, an official said Tuesday, suggesting that the death toll could top 500. Storms that raged June 8-10 ravaged areas across the west of China, triggering flooding and mudslides that destroyed thousands of houses and wrecked bridges and roads. Officials have reported 253 deaths.
WORLD
March 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Two people have died and 10 others were hospitalized after eating poisonous globefish in central China's Shaanxi province, officials said. The fish, also called puffer fish, are not common in Shaanxi, where people were apparently unfamiliar with the strict safety procedures required in preparing the fish, which has toxic ovaries and liver. Three of the 10 people hospitalized have been discharged and the remaining seven were in stable condition, said a health official.
WORLD
December 7, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
If pandas weren't so darn cute, we wouldn't be up in the clouds at the edge of a mountain ravine slick with moss and mud, clinging for life to shoots of bamboo. And get this: There is almost zero chance that we'll actually see a panda. We keep our eyes on the ground, not just to keep from falling, but because the best we can hope for is to discover panda droppings (and even the chances of that aren't so hot). "To be honest, I've been working in these mountains for 20 years and I've never seen a panda in the wild," says Dai Bo, 43, a wildlife biologist with China's Forestry Ministry who's wearing a camouflage jacket and hiking boots and has a zoom-lens Canon around his neck, just in case.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
When the earth shook off the coast of Japan on Friday, the magnitude 8.9 quake became the fifth strongest since 1900. According to records kept by the U.S. Geological Survey's Earthquake Information Center, the largest quake remains the one in Chile in 1960 that measured 9.5. That was followed by the 1964 quake in Prince William Sound, Alaska, at 9.2; the 2004 quake off of Sumatra, at 9.1; and the 1952 quake in Kamchatka, a peninsula in eastern Russia...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
People who travel widely and are drawn to exhibitions of ancient art sometimes get the impression that an entire layer of civilization lies under the crust of earth we stand on. For those who survey a map of China in the catalogue for "The Quest for Eternity: Chinese Ceramic Sculpture From the People's Republic of China," at the County Museum of Art (through Jan. 3), the impression may solidify into a conviction.
NEWS
May 26, 1986 | Associated Press
Archeologists have unearthed more than 200 relics in the last two weeks from the 2,600-year-old tomb of a Chin state duke in Shaanxi province, the People's Daily reported Sunday. The tomb of the Duke of Jin in Fengxiang county is the largest burial chamber found in China this century. The overseas edition of the official newspaper said that all the artifacts found are valuable and include gold, jade and bronze objects, pottery and lacquer.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | From Reuters
Flash floods caused by torrential rains in the north China province of Shaanxi have killed 132 people and destroyed more than 10,000 houses in the past three weeks, the official newspaper People's Daily reported Wednesday. The paper's overseas edition said 264 villages lining watercourses in the hilly region of southern Shaanxi were completely washed away by floodwaters surging through the narrow valleys.
WORLD
November 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The death toll in a coal mine explosion in central China rose to 63, with 103 workers still missing, the government said. Emergency workers descended into the Chenjiashan mine in Shaanxi province to repair ventilation systems needed to pump out toxic fumes. Hopes were fading for the missing, the official New China News Agency said.
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