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Shabaka Barry Henley

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1995
The fact of the matter: Los Angeles is an industry town, and theater is not its industry. This fact affects the life and work of all who choose to make theater here. To assess the general state of the theater in Los Angeles today, Times Theater Critic Laurie Winer brought together a round-table discussion with five people whose experiences are utterly diverse but who are tied together by their passion for making theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1995
The fact of the matter: Los Angeles is an industry town, and theater is not its industry. This fact affects the life and work of all who choose to make theater here. To assess the general state of the theater in Los Angeles today, Times Theater Critic Laurie Winer brought together a round-table discussion with five people whose experiences are utterly diverse but who are tied together by their passion for making theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Although it's been a less than stellar time for race relations in Los Angeles, one of this city's premier African-American theater artists is having "his best year in a long time." It's not that Shabaka Barry Henley, best known by the single name Shabaka, is taking the troubles lying down. On the contrary, this multitalented actor-director sees them as part of an ongoing process of change--the cause that's long fueled his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Although it's been a less than stellar time for race relations in Los Angeles, one of this city's premier African-American theater artists is having "his best year in a long time." It's not that Shabaka Barry Henley, best known by the single name Shabaka, is taking the troubles lying down. On the contrary, this multitalented actor-director sees them as part of an ongoing process of change--the cause that's long fueled his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1997 | JANA J. MONJI
Playwright-actor Ted Lange of "Love Boat" fame asks a familiar question: Would you sell your soul to the devil? "Soul Survivor," a choppy comedy playing at the Lee Strasberg Creative Center, is a tad predictable, and the chemistry and timing of the three principals are not always on target. After a night of pizza and Jack Daniels, a recently jilted postal worker named Guy (Lange) meets the Devil (Shabaka Barry Henley).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES
With his hangdog features and affable demeanor, Shabaka Barry Henley brings an immediately appealing everyman persona to "Jungle Bells," another installment in the Loco Motion Festival at Actors' Gang Theatre. Henley's new work from the Black Theatre Artists Workshop weaves his thoughtful historical reflections on his complicated African American heritage into a quest for the universal in human experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Abdul died in 1979 but his spirit lingers on. His friend, a struggling writer named Naeem (Bingwa), attempts to figure out why Abdul shot his wife and killed himself those many years ago. Or, more spiritually speaking, Naeem believes Abdul's soul is stuck on its journey and he wants to help free it. In "Ritual of a Bop Solo," Naeem is a stand-in for author Tarabu Betserai Kirkland, who wrote the play both to memorialize and figure out a real-life friend who died under similar circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1997
Children can experience music in a new way during the L.A. Philharmonic's Toyota Symphonies for Youth series. The season kicks off with preconcert activities, where children 5 to 11 can meet musicians and try out instruments. The main event happens at 11 a.m. with guest conductor Roger Norrington leading the Philharmonic and pianist Emanuel Ax performing. (This is a junior version of a full program of Chopin, Berlioz and Smetana taking place Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For minorities, participation in mainstream society carries with it some inherently surreal qualities, especially when it entails sacrificing parts of one's cultural identity. Depicting the eerier manifestations of alienation is the common theme in three new one-acts from the Black Theatre Artists Workshop at Los Angeles Theatre Center: Rusty Cundieff's "The Black Horror Show," and two shorter works by Clay Goss, "Being Hit" and "Andie."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | Don Shirley
When the former Los Angeles Theatre Center company was in its heyday in the late '80s, the LATC lobby was famous as a hangout where multicultural mingling took place on a regular basis. The next four months promise to bring back some of that ferment. It will be the busiest chunk of time at LATC since the building's resident company folded in 1991, according to LATC business manager Lee Sweet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
There is, on the vast stage of the Los Angeles Theatre Center's Theatre 3, a churning world in microcosm: human history seen through the eyes of an 18th-Century gnat. But this 18th Century (we are told) is the 18th Century as we imagine it today-- ergo, Anytime. And this gnat is Jacques, a servant, who travels with his Master (Everyman and Everymaster) as they chronicle, for whoever cares to listen in, their loves, lives and assorted other subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1995 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer.
W hat would you tell an L.A. newcomer who asked, "Where can I go to see a black play?" This question was raised by Shay Wafer, a panelist at "The State of Black Theatre Today," a conference sponsored by the Mark Taper Forum's Blacksmyths program last weekend. Wafer pointed out that the L.A.
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