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Shahid Nadeem

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NEWS
September 19, 2001 | ALLAN M. JALON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a day when the world was watching Pakistan to see how effectively its leaders would support America's effort to bring Osama bin Laden and the Taliban to heel, Pakistan's leading dissident playwright was veering along the Pacific Coast Highway in a beat-up Volvo, singing his version of "Mack the Knife" in Punjabi. It was the only lighthearted interlude as Shahid Nadeem talked about the complexities of a region whose fate has become violently bound with that of the United States.
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NEWS
September 19, 2001 | ALLAN M. JALON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a day when the world was watching Pakistan to see how effectively its leaders would support America's effort to bring Osama bin Laden and the Taliban to heel, Pakistan's leading dissident playwright was veering along the Pacific Coast Highway in a beat-up Volvo, singing his version of "Mack the Knife" in Punjabi. It was the only lighthearted interlude as Shahid Nadeem talked about the complexities of a region whose fate has become violently bound with that of the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2001
All public programs scheduled in conjunction with "The World From Here" exhibition are free and open to the public and will be at the UCLA Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Westwood. (310) 443-7000. "An Infinity of Good, Singular and Remarkable Books," lecture by Nicolas Barker, former head of conservation at the British Library. Sunday, 3 p.m. (310) 443-7000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2001
Lyle Lovett's career as an actor hasn't exactly skyrocketed, but his affiliation with filmmaker Robert Altman continues to be a creative outlet--his most recent album is the soundtrack to the director's "Dr. T and the Women," in which the Texan stretches into predominantly instrumental territory. * Lyle Lovett & His Large Band, with Shawn Colvin, Greek Theatre, 2700 Vermont Canyon Road, 7:30 p.m. $19.50 to $68.50. (323) 665-1927. 6 pm: Festival The sixth annual Gourmet L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
"A wave of despondency fell on artists" after the events of Sept. 11, said Felix Pire, a writer, actor and director. "A lot of them just wanted to vent their pent-up emotions. It created a reason to create art instantly." Art can't be as instant as TV coverage, of course. But now, after more than three months, plays in direct response to Sept. 11 are beginning to emerge. An evening of readings at Beyond Baroque in Venice on Thursday, directed by Pire, was devoted to that subject.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
Perched on a panoramic bluff overlooking the bustling port of San Pedro is a sleepy, nondescript cluster of one- and two-story buildings, 11 of them, on land formerly used by the military. Nathan Birnbaum, a tall, lean 47-year-old, surveys the facility. "This is a sleeping princess about to wake up," he says. "This is part of the whole L.A. arts scene."
WORLD
September 14, 2009 | Mark Magnier
To find the music department of the University of the Punjab, travel several miles from the main campus to a red-brick building, down some dark stairs, left through a shadowy corridor and into a warren of small, windowless rooms. The dank basement befits a department exiled after a militant student group called it un-Islamic, un-Pakistani and unwanted. There were threats, protests, machine-gun-toting bodyguards. Then, the basement. These are the front lines of Pakistan's culture wars, a very real battlefield with bombs and bloodshed where musicians, filmmakers, painters and theater groups face off against the Taliban and other militants.
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