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Shahram Amiri

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OPINION
July 15, 2010
Iranian defector or CIA kidnap victim? Willing or unwilling informant on Iran's nuclear program? There are more questions than answers about Iranian scientist Shahram Amiri, who made news after showing up at an office of the Pakistani Embassy in Washington and saying he wanted to return home. But the most pressing one of all is: What will happen to him in Tehran? Surely there will be an initial fanfare, with Amiri appearing on Iranian state television to describe being kidnapped, drugged and tortured by U.S. agents.
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WORLD
October 10, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Iran's atomic energy chief has acknowledged that Western spies had infiltrated the country's nuclear program, but he said that Iranian officials had countered their efforts. Ali Akbar Salehi, head of the Atomic Energy Organization, said officials have increased security to make it "almost impossible" for secrets to leak out, the pro-government Fars news agency said in a report late Friday. "The issue of spies existed in the past, but is diminishing day by day," he said. Salehi's admission was the most frank admission by an Iranian that Western clandestine services had been successful in attempts to penetrate the country's nuclear program, now under scrutiny by the West.
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WORLD
July 14, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
– An Iranian nuclear scientist involved in a murky and clandestine tug-of-war between Tehran and Washington is on his way back to the Islamic Republic, a government spokesman said Wednesday morning. Shahram Amiri, a 32- or 33-year-old scientist who was in the United States as a result of a defection or a kidnapping, has left America and is en route to Tehran, said the spokesman for Iran's Foreign Ministry. "Shahram Amiri left America with a convoy from the interest section of the Islamic Republic of Iran in Washington a few minutes ago," Ramin Mehmanparast said in comments reported by the official Islamic Republic News Agency.
WORLD
September 9, 2010 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
An American woman, one of three U.S. hikers jailed in Iran last year after possibly straying into Iranian territory, will be released Saturday, an Iranian official said Thursday. Friends and relatives say Joshua Fattal, Shane Bauer and Sarah Shourd were on a hiking trip in the scenic mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan near the Iranian border July 31, 2009, when they may have strayed inadvertently into Iranian territory. They were detained by Iranian forces and have been locked up in Tehran's infamous Evin Prison.
WORLD
July 15, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
Iran says the man at the center of a murky intelligence caper -- stretching from the deserts of Saudi Arabia to the strip malls of Tucson to the diplomatic outposts of Washington and back to Tehran -- is a nobody, a simple researcher with no special knowledge of the country's nuclear program. Shahram Amiri, whose plane landed in Tehran on Thursday, had been described by Iranians up until now as a radio isotope scientist employed by the nation's Atomic Energy Organization, as well as an affiliate of an elite university that turns out specialists for the Revolutionary Guard.
WORLD
July 14, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Iranian nuclear scientist Shahram Amiri headed back to Tehran on Wednesday after dropping a cryptic and perhaps inadvertent clue about his mysterious odyssey since disappearing more than a year ago. "I was in a unique situation: not completely free, not completely in jail," he said in an interview broadcast on Iranian state television. "It is difficult to explain." For more than a year, Amiri has been at the center of a murky and clandestine tug of war between Tehran and Washington.
WORLD
July 13, 2010 | By Paul Richter and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Shahram Amiri sounds like a contented man in one video, nestled in a leather chair, assuring his audience that he is free and safe to continue his education in America. But, in a second clip, the Iranian scientist warns in stilted phrases that the CIA kidnapped him, brought him to the United States and tortured him with the goal of "proving lies" about Iran's disputed nuclear program. The two online videos sum up the murky and contradictory narratives at the heart of Amiri's tale, which took a surprising turn Monday when the 32-year-old scientist presented himself at the Iranian consular office in Washington saying he wished to go home.
WORLD
October 10, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Iran's atomic energy chief has acknowledged that Western spies had infiltrated the country's nuclear program, but he said that Iranian officials had countered their efforts. Ali Akbar Salehi, head of the Atomic Energy Organization, said officials have increased security to make it "almost impossible" for secrets to leak out, the pro-government Fars news agency said in a report late Friday. "The issue of spies existed in the past, but is diminishing day by day," he said. Salehi's admission was the most frank admission by an Iranian that Western clandestine services had been successful in attempts to penetrate the country's nuclear program, now under scrutiny by the West.
WORLD
December 9, 2009 | By Borzou Daragahi
Iran's top diplomat accused the United States and Saudi Arabia on Tuesday of kidnapping one of its nuclear scientists. Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki told reporters that Shahram Amiri, who worked for Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, disappeared during a summer religious pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia. He said Tehran had evidence that the U.S. was involved in the disappearance. "The U.S. should give back our compatriots based on the call of their family and people," Mottaki told reporters during an appearance with his United Arab Emirates counterpart, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency.
WORLD
September 9, 2010 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
An American woman, one of three U.S. hikers jailed in Iran last year after possibly straying into Iranian territory, will be released Saturday, an Iranian official said Thursday. Friends and relatives say Joshua Fattal, Shane Bauer and Sarah Shourd were on a hiking trip in the scenic mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan near the Iranian border July 31, 2009, when they may have strayed inadvertently into Iranian territory. They were detained by Iranian forces and have been locked up in Tehran's infamous Evin Prison.
WORLD
July 15, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
Iran says the man at the center of a murky intelligence caper -- stretching from the deserts of Saudi Arabia to the strip malls of Tucson to the diplomatic outposts of Washington and back to Tehran -- is a nobody, a simple researcher with no special knowledge of the country's nuclear program. Shahram Amiri, whose plane landed in Tehran on Thursday, had been described by Iranians up until now as a radio isotope scientist employed by the nation's Atomic Energy Organization, as well as an affiliate of an elite university that turns out specialists for the Revolutionary Guard.
OPINION
July 15, 2010
Iranian defector or CIA kidnap victim? Willing or unwilling informant on Iran's nuclear program? There are more questions than answers about Iranian scientist Shahram Amiri, who made news after showing up at an office of the Pakistani Embassy in Washington and saying he wanted to return home. But the most pressing one of all is: What will happen to him in Tehran? Surely there will be an initial fanfare, with Amiri appearing on Iranian state television to describe being kidnapped, drugged and tortured by U.S. agents.
WORLD
July 14, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Iranian nuclear scientist Shahram Amiri headed back to Tehran on Wednesday after dropping a cryptic and perhaps inadvertent clue about his mysterious odyssey since disappearing more than a year ago. "I was in a unique situation: not completely free, not completely in jail," he said in an interview broadcast on Iranian state television. "It is difficult to explain." For more than a year, Amiri has been at the center of a murky and clandestine tug of war between Tehran and Washington.
WORLD
July 14, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
– An Iranian nuclear scientist involved in a murky and clandestine tug-of-war between Tehran and Washington is on his way back to the Islamic Republic, a government spokesman said Wednesday morning. Shahram Amiri, a 32- or 33-year-old scientist who was in the United States as a result of a defection or a kidnapping, has left America and is en route to Tehran, said the spokesman for Iran's Foreign Ministry. "Shahram Amiri left America with a convoy from the interest section of the Islamic Republic of Iran in Washington a few minutes ago," Ramin Mehmanparast said in comments reported by the official Islamic Republic News Agency.
WORLD
July 13, 2010 | By Paul Richter and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Shahram Amiri sounds like a contented man in one video, nestled in a leather chair, assuring his audience that he is free and safe to continue his education in America. But, in a second clip, the Iranian scientist warns in stilted phrases that the CIA kidnapped him, brought him to the United States and tortured him with the goal of "proving lies" about Iran's disputed nuclear program. The two online videos sum up the murky and contradictory narratives at the heart of Amiri's tale, which took a surprising turn Monday when the 32-year-old scientist presented himself at the Iranian consular office in Washington saying he wished to go home.
WORLD
December 9, 2009 | By Borzou Daragahi
Iran's top diplomat accused the United States and Saudi Arabia on Tuesday of kidnapping one of its nuclear scientists. Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki told reporters that Shahram Amiri, who worked for Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, disappeared during a summer religious pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia. He said Tehran had evidence that the U.S. was involved in the disappearance. "The U.S. should give back our compatriots based on the call of their family and people," Mottaki told reporters during an appearance with his United Arab Emirates counterpart, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency.
WORLD
October 8, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Ramin Mostaghim
Tehran accused the U.S. today of involvement in the disappearance of an Iranian nuclear scientist it claims vanished after leaving for a pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia in late May. Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki said Shahram Amiri has not been heard from since shortly after he entered the Saudi kingdom, a close U.S. ally agitated over Iran's nuclear program. Iranian news media reported that Amiri researches nuclear technology uses for medicine, but other reports suggested he worked at a recently disclosed uranium enrichment plant near Qom. "We have found documents that prove U.S. interference in the disappearance of the Iranian pilgrim Shahram Amiri in Saudi Arabia," Mottaki told reporters after a Cabinet meeting, according to Iran's state-owned Press TV. "Iran's Foreign Ministry will follow the case."
WORLD
October 8, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Ramin Mostaghim
Tehran accused the U.S. today of involvement in the disappearance of an Iranian nuclear scientist it claims vanished after leaving for a pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia in late May. Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki said Shahram Amiri has not been heard from since shortly after he entered the Saudi kingdom, a close U.S. ally agitated over Iran's nuclear program. Iranian news media reported that Amiri researches nuclear technology uses for medicine, but other reports suggested he worked at a recently disclosed uranium enrichment plant near Qom. "We have found documents that prove U.S. interference in the disappearance of the Iranian pilgrim Shahram Amiri in Saudi Arabia," Mottaki told reporters after a Cabinet meeting, according to Iran's state-owned Press TV. "Iran's Foreign Ministry will follow the case."
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