Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShahrzad Sepanlou
IN THE NEWS

Shahrzad Sepanlou

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
January 28, 2001 | JORDAN RAPHAEL, Jordan Raphael's last story for the magazine was about the Internet adventures of comics icon Stan Lee
Shahrzad Sepanlou's cell phone rings. At her office desk on a Tuesday morning, the 28-year-old event coordinator at UCLA considers her silver Samsung. She usually leaves its calls to the answering service, but she's already checked her boss' e-mail, arranged his schedule, paid some bills and sorted the mail. She may as well see who's calling on the line she uses for her real business. On the other end is a man from Ahvaz, a large city in southwestern Iran.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
January 28, 2001 | JORDAN RAPHAEL, Jordan Raphael's last story for the magazine was about the Internet adventures of comics icon Stan Lee
Shahrzad Sepanlou's cell phone rings. At her office desk on a Tuesday morning, the 28-year-old event coordinator at UCLA considers her silver Samsung. She usually leaves its calls to the answering service, but she's already checked her boss' e-mail, arranged his schedule, paid some bills and sorted the mail. She may as well see who's calling on the line she uses for her real business. On the other end is a man from Ahvaz, a large city in southwestern Iran.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Iranians, she's simply Googoosh, a Marilyn Monroe beauty with a Barbra Streisand voice, a timeless icon whose timeworn ballads still inspire generations. So it's no less than a miracle to millions of adoring fans worldwide that this legendary diva, silenced by the veil cast upon her and other women in her Islamic homeland more than two decades ago, has finally resurfaced to launch an international tour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
From the house we built With blood and soil To the road on which The moonlight procession Flies forth on their boat Of shooting stars It is a pity you did not wish To stay here with us The poet had crafted those words so long ago. Flush from the victory of a People's Revolution in Iran that ousted a repressive monarch for a bearded cleric who spouted promises of freedom and quality, Partow Nooriala all too soon came to believe that the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini had deceived them.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|