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November 3, 2005 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
A sphere rendered in a flat, pictographic style dominates the screen in artist Shahzia Sikander's seven-minute animated video, "Pursuit Curve." Assumptions of scale vary, and it's unclear whether the orb represents a world, a bush, a flower, a clump of cells or perhaps a molecule or atom.
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NEWS
November 3, 2005 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
A sphere rendered in a flat, pictographic style dominates the screen in artist Shahzia Sikander's seven-minute animated video, "Pursuit Curve." Assumptions of scale vary, and it's unclear whether the orb represents a world, a bush, a flower, a clump of cells or perhaps a molecule or atom.
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NEWS
April 8, 2004 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Shahzia Sikander's exhibition at the San Diego Museum of Art is no blockbuster. In fact, it's a refreshing example of the anti-blockbuster -- a small, focused show grounded in the museum's permanent collection. The second in SDMA's "Contemporary Links" series, it makes a compelling case for the continuing relevance and generosity of art of the past. Self-consciousness about artistic lineage runs high among artists these days.
NEWS
April 8, 2004 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Shahzia Sikander's exhibition at the San Diego Museum of Art is no blockbuster. In fact, it's a refreshing example of the anti-blockbuster -- a small, focused show grounded in the museum's permanent collection. The second in SDMA's "Contemporary Links" series, it makes a compelling case for the continuing relevance and generosity of art of the past. Self-consciousness about artistic lineage runs high among artists these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
AS the Museum of Modern Art's refurbished and expanded building continues to pack in crowds in New York, the museum is reaching out to a young audience on the Internet. MoMA's teen website, Red Studio -- launched last year with an interview with artist Vito Acconci -- has a batch of new features designed to encourage 13- to 19-year-olds to spend some time with modern and contemporary art. What do you find if you visit www.moma.org/redstudio?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011 | By Michael J. Ybarra, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Mogul emperor Shah Jahan sits cross-legged, in three-quarters profile, wearing a magnificent purple robe, jewels draped around his neck, a gold cloth wrapped around his head. His fine features are set off by a full beard and a slight smile. The emperor, who ruled India for 30 years and built the Taj Mahal, sits in the center of a busy painting, a constellation of supplicants swirling around him like planets orbiting a star. The small but lovely picture, no bigger than a laptop screen, depicts the Persian Ambassador Muhammad Ali Beg offering tribute to Shah Jahan.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | MARINA BUDHOS, Marina Budhos is the author of two novels, "House of Waiting" and "The Professor of Light," and a nonfiction book, "Remix: Conversations with Immigrant Teenagers." She has been a Fulbright scholar to India.
"Video," a group of 10 stories by a new Indian writer, Meera Nair, had a little sizzle of celebrity a while back: The title story won the first PEN/Amazon.com short-story contest for unpublished writers in 2000 but was subsequently disqualified because another of her stories had been published in the Threepenny Review.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2010 | By Sharon Mizota
When Picasso incorporated motifs from African art into his paintings, it was seen as a step forward for modern art. No one thought about what it might mean for African traditions. After all, they were "primitive" and therefore frozen in time. Something similar might be said for our understanding of South Asian miniature painting. Although references to its diminutive, highly stylized depictions of aristocratic life or mythic stories have appeared in contemporary art -- Shahzia Sikander's work being the most prominent example -- there has been little discussion about how the miniature tradition itself has evolved.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
People usually expect artists to be free of the audience considerations demanded of popular culture. As Lily Tomlin once wryly observed of her profession: "After all, they don't call it 'show art.' " Well, they can now. Show art, as distinct from show business, has arrived. It's the name I would give to the ethos of the 1997 Biennial Exhibition that opened Thursday at the Whitney Museum of American Art here.
SCIENCE
September 19, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A UCLA mathematician sometimes called the "Mozart of Math," a Stanford University aviation engineer using abstract mathematical principles to help prevent airborne collisions, a San Francisco entrepreneur developing affordable drugs for neglected diseases in Third World countries and a Palo Alto engineer helping the blind read are among the 25 winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grants. Each winner will receive $500,000 over five years to use as they see fit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2006 | Michael Z. Wise, Special to The Times
AMID the calamitous violence sparked by cartoon images of Muhammad, it's only natural that the Museum of Modern Art would tread carefully when opening a major new exhibition dealing with the Islamic world. "I was acutely aware of a number of pitfalls," says curator Fereshteh Daftari. There are no caricatures of the prophet on view at MoMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2009 | Susan Emerling
The Hammer Museum not long ago held the final meeting of its second artist council, a group of a dozen artists from around the world who'd been brought together to address some of the museum's more vexing logistical and philosophical problems. In the wrap-up discussion, there was near unanimous appreciation for the open dialogue between the artists and museum administrators, but there was also a healthy dose of dissent and even indignation.
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