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Shakedown

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Shakedown" (citywide) is mindlessly enjoyable escapist fare in which a courtroom drama is enlivened by intercutting it with a couple of wholly improbable but spectacular chases in--and above--New York. It's said to be based on a true story, but you could have fooled me. Peter Weller stars as Roland Dalton, a Manhattan Legal Aid attorney handed a final assignment before moving up to a cushy job at the Wall Street firm of his future father-in-law.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
A father and son were arrested Thursday in connection with separate fraud schemes -- one of them a shakedown that targeted small businesses -- moments before boarding a Russia-bound plane. Viktor Ryzhkin, 45, and his son Evgenii Ryzhkin, 22, of Los Angeles were arrested as they prepared to board a plane to Moscow with two other family members at Los Angeles International Airport. The pair face federal fraud charges for separate alleged crimes, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988
The only movie detective to this date that has used the . 45 magnum was Sam Elliott's character, Ritchie Marks, in the film "Shakedown." WHITNEY BAIN Universal City
NATIONAL
May 4, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Obaidullah, an Afghan villager captured with diagrams of improvised bombs, has marked nearly 11 years as a detainee at the U.S. naval base on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Three months ago, outraged by what he called another prison "shakedown," he joined a hunger strike there, and now is locked in solitary confinement with at least 100 fellow detainees. "I have seen men who are on the verge of death being taken away to be force-fed," Obaidullah said in a federal court affidavit declassified Friday.
NEWS
September 11, 1986
The newly commissioned and modernized World War II battleship Missouri left Long Beach Harbor on a three-month shakedown cruise that will take it and its 1,600 crew members around the world. After a brief stopover at Pearl Harbor, the 887-foot Missouri will head for Australia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2001
I am surprised that The Times would print Cynthia Tucker's Aug. 20 commentary, "Mfume's Ego Got in the Way." Her criticism of Kweisi Mfume's efforts to place minorities in prominent positions as being self-serving and leaving the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People vulnerable to charges of a shakedown is judgmental. Her use of the word "shakedown" is inflammatory. She even refers to the Rev. Jessie Jackson's work as a shakedown, and that sets the tone for the whole piece.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | United Press International
Donn Fulton Eisele, an astronaut aboard the first shakedown flight of an Apollo moonship that orbited Earth for 11 days in 1968 and who went on to serve as director of the Peace Corps in Thailand, died in Tokyo Tuesday night. He was 57. His death was confirmed by Jim Gertz of Prudential-Bache Securities in Fort Lauderdale, where Eisele had worked for about a year. Gertz said he was informed by Eisele's wife this morning. He did not disclose the circumstances of the death.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2009
Re: "States' rivalry for jobs heats up," Aug. 24: If Assemblyman Jose Solorio (D-Santa Ana) really wants to keep businesses in California, he and his fellow legislators need to put their effort into improving California's business climate, not into producing an ad campaign. Thousands of Californians have lost their jobs in the last year and a recent poll by California Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse shows voters are now making the connection that unwarranted lawsuits are costing jobs.
OPINION
June 20, 2010 | Doyle McManus
The high point for President Obama last week wasn't when he got BP to agree to put $20 billion aside to pay for damages from the gulf oil spill. The high point was when an oil-state congressman, Joe L. Barton of Texas, denounced the deal as a Chicago-style "shakedown." For weeks, Obama had seemed powerless in the face of the blowout. He'd been reduced to telling people all the things he couldn't do. "I can't dive down there and plug the hole," he said. "I can't suck it up with a straw."
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
A father and son were arrested Thursday in connection with separate fraud schemes -- one of them a shakedown that targeted small businesses -- moments before boarding a Russia-bound plane. Viktor Ryzhkin, 45, and his son Evgenii Ryzhkin, 22, of Los Angeles were arrested as they prepared to board a plane to Moscow with two other family members at Los Angeles International Airport. The pair face federal fraud charges for separate alleged crimes, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
A bill that would deter small-business shakedowns for Proposition 65 signage violations has been approved by a state Assembly committee. AB 227 would give business owners who violate the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act 14 days to comply without facing steep fines. Prop. 65, passed in 1986, requires establishments to warn customers that they could be exposed to certain chemicals such as alcohol. Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles) introduced the bill after he was told by small-business owners that the law is easily abused by lawyers who file claims in the hopes of extracting settlements.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2013 | David Lazarus
Brad Newman thinks that people who post lots of reviews on websites such as Yelp or TripAdvisor don't get enough respect from the businesses they write about. So he's come up with his own business, a Manhattan Beach company called ReviewerCard that issues IDs to prolific online reviewers to help them get better service than the rest of us. Granted, that's not how Newman, 35, would put it. He sees ReviewerCard as a way to enhance the relationship between amateur reviewers and the hotels or restaurants they visit.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Facebook Inc. asked a federal judge to throw out a case brought by a New York state man who claims he's entitled to half of Mark Zuckerberg's multibillion-dollar stake in the social networking giant. Calling it a "fraudulent shakedown," Facebook filed the motion to dismiss the lawsuit Monday. The Menlo Park, Calif., social networking service aims to quash the case that is unfolding in federal court in Buffalo, N.Y., ahead of Facebook's initial public stock offering that could value Facebook at $100 billion or more.
OPINION
November 1, 2011 | By Lawrence Weschler
A bit over an hour into the five-hour drive across the ferrous red plateau, heading toward Uganda's capital, Kampala, suddenly, there's the Nile, a boiling, roiling cataract at this time of year, rain-swollen and rabid below the bridge that vaults over it. Naturally, I take out my iPhone and begin snapping pics. On the other side of the bridge, three soldiers standing in the road, rifles slung over their shoulders, direct my driver, Godfrey, to pull over. "You were photographing the bridge," one of them says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Consumers who buy a product as a result of misleading advertising can sue the manufacturer even if the product was not defective, the California Supreme Court decided in a 5-2 ruling Thursday. Advocates of limiting lawsuits lambasted the ruling and warned that it might lead to clogging of the courts at a time when court funding is being cut. Consumer representatives countered that their victory would help keep manufacturers honest. The decision resolved a long battle between California consumers and business over the scope of Proposition 64, the 2004 ballot measure intended to end so-called "shakedown" lawsuits against business.
OPINION
June 20, 2010 | Doyle McManus
The high point for President Obama last week wasn't when he got BP to agree to put $20 billion aside to pay for damages from the gulf oil spill. The high point was when an oil-state congressman, Joe L. Barton of Texas, denounced the deal as a Chicago-style "shakedown." For weeks, Obama had seemed powerless in the face of the blowout. He'd been reduced to telling people all the things he couldn't do. "I can't dive down there and plug the hole," he said. "I can't suck it up with a straw."
SPORTS
May 2, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Georgs Kolesnikovs, sailing the 60-foot trimaran Great American in the Cape Horn Challenge from New York to San Francisco, said that if conditions hold, he will reach the finish line early on May 27--nearly three days ahead of the record set in February by Warren Luhrs' Thursday's Child, a 60-foot monohull. Luhrs finished in 80 days 20 hours, breaking the record of 89 days 8 hours set by the clipper ship Flying Cloud 135 years earlier. Kolesnikovs, who left New York with Steve Pettengill on March 10, spoke by radio telephone from near Robinson Crusoe Island off the coast of Chile last weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2003 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
Anarchy is a precious thing, a kind of miracle that can never be planned, no matter how many punks embrace it as a personal jingle or fashion statement. So it was at the Saturday opening of the L.A. Shakedown fest, a day that went so horribly wrong and accidentally right that it became a profound tribute to that ancient punk rock creed.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2010 | Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Republicans eager to attack President Obama have waded into politically treacherous waters by assailing creation of a $20-billion gulf relief fund, risking the appearance that they side with BP over victims of the oil spill. "I'm ashamed of what happened in the White House yesterday," Rep. Joe L. Barton, a major recipient of donations from the oil and gas industry, told BP Chief Executive Tony Hayward near the start of a congressional hearing Thursday. The escrow fund, created at the insistence of the administration, was "a tragedy of the first proportion … a $20-billion shakedown," Barton said.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2010 | By Tom Hamburger and Kim Geiger, Tribune Washington Bureau
Rep. Joe L. Barton of Texas, the ranking Republican on the House Energy and Commerce Committee who apologized to BP for what he termed a White HouseĀ "shakedown," has a long history of helping the oil and gas industry on Capitol Hill. Though energy interests have long played a big role in the lives of Texas congressional members and their constituents, Barton has strong financial ties that run through his personal and public life. The industry has been Barton's biggest patron since 1999, donating more than $1.4 million to his campaigns.
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