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NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Salt is bad for us; no, it's not; yes, it is. Many Americans probably thought this debate had been put to rest. A new study suggests this isn't the case.  That study, which found that low salt consumption was linked to a higher rate of cardiovascular disease and deaths, has cast new light on the skeptics of the "eat less salt" mantra. Many health experts were quick to say that the new research was flawed, in part because it only sampled a small number of adults, and young white adults at that.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Do I have special powers? people have asked. Not that I'm consciously aware of. Yes, it's true that in my Sunday column I noted we were certain to have more earthquakes and ought to do more to prepare for them, as San Francisco has. And the next day - boom! - a 4.4 centered in Encino reminded us we have no batteries in the flashlight and can't find it anyway. But no, I can't predict the time and location of earthquakes any more than I can tell you when your broken sidewalk will get fixed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011
Remember last year's New Year's resolution to lose that cocktail tummy? Yeah, that one. Well, we're plowing into the holiday season all over again and you've still got that cute little pot. Help is on the way in the form of a series of "fresh & skinny" cocktails served at the Yard House. Head mixologist Kip Snider shares a recipe for his tasty Juniper Fusion, which clocks in at somewhere between 115 and 170 calories. It's light in flavor as well: Cucumbers and strawberries enhance crisp gin that is spiked with tart lemon and lime juice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2013 | STEVE LOPEZ
You could say she was a waitress, but that doesn't begin to cover it. You could say she was a reliable employee, good colleague and devoted family member, but that doesn't paint the whole picture, either. The world changes around us. It becomes less recognizable and more complicated, and sometimes we need the comfort of something constant, or the touch of someone who connects us to our own history. For countless customers at Shakers in South Pasadena, for more than four decades, Margaret Mc- Whorter was that person.
HOME & GARDEN
February 14, 2008
Thank you for the article on "Shaker's Sweet Success" [Feb. 7]. I immediately went to the top shelf in my kitchen and took down my sugar shaker. Sure enough, on the inside of the lid was printed Dripcut-Starline. Mine was dated 1959. In 1957, I worked on a campaign to build Bay Harbor Hospital in Harbor City and later I became a volunteer. I have no idea when the hospital purchased the shakers, but when the hospital closed in 2000, I took a shaker. I have placed the article inside so my heirs will know its history.
FOOD
April 2, 2008
  Total time: 5 minutes Servings: 1 Note: From Colin Campbell of BLT Steak. Campbell uses Tio Pepe sherry, available at fine-wine merchants. To make simple syrup, heat equal amounts of sugar and water in a small saucepan over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Allow to cool before using. 2 ounces chopped cucumber, plus 1 slice for garnish 2 ounces Hendrick's gin 1/2 ounce dry fino sherry 1 ounce fresh lemon juice 1 ounce simple syrup Place the cucumber in a shaker and muddle.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | WASHINGTON POST
The return of the cocktail culture has business booming in everything from cigars to torch singers' soundtracks. Riding the wave of related kitsch and collectibles are vintage cocktail shakers. "They're hotter than heck no matter who you talk to," says expert Harry Rinker. Stephen Visakay, author of "Vintage Bar Ware" (Collector Books), notes that the popularity of cocktails grew through the Art Deco era and the Great Depression.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Well, what do you know, we had a quake, and we had a warning too. As my colleague Joseph Serna reported Wednesday:  An earthquake early warning system being tested in California gave seismologists in Pasadena up to 30 seconds to prepare for Monday morning's temblor in the desert of Riverside County. “It was right,” said Kate Hutton, a seismologist with Caltech. “I sat really still to see if I could feel it and it worked.” Hopefully, Hutton was saying that without surprise in her voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner
When Francesca Lia Block sat down to write her latest young adult novel, "Love in the Time of Global Warming" (Holt Books for Young Readers: 240 pp., $16.99), she took her beloved hometown of Los Angeles and destroyed it. But she didn't just destroy it. She burned it to the ground in the lyrical, hallucinogenic way in which she once elevated the very same city to celestial heights in her first novel, "Weetzie Bat," and all the adult and young adult fiction she's written since. We meet 17-year old Penelope, the book's protagonist, briefly during the catastrophic environmental event that she calls the "earth shaker," and then in earnest two weeks later, adjusting to a new reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2011 | Hector Tobar
It's not every day I get excited about a salt shaker. But there it was, a glass cylinder with a slanted top of chromed steel. Next to it, its sister, the pepper shaker, and a big dad of a sugar shaker. The sight of these elegant little objects transported me to my youth. Growing up in L.A., I'd see them in diners and restaurants, and in my own kitchen. In the 1960s, they looked modern and sleek. Space Age salt and pepper shakers. They were created by Henry Keck, a Cal Tech-trained designer.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Mark Gonzales
ST. LOUIS - During John Mozeliak's six-year reign, the Cardinals general manager has traded popular center fielder Jim Edmonds, held firm in his contract offer that resulted in slugger Albert Pujols' leaving, and sent perennial prospect Colby Rasmus to the Toronto Blue Jays as part of the revamping of a roster that essentially helped the Cardinals win the 2011 World Series. As daring and as successful as those decisions were, Mozeliak's decision not to acquire a veteran starting pitcher or a seasoned shortstop has helped the Cardinals' long-term future remain promising.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
While rising to chief technology officer for Magellan Navigation in the 1990s, Anatole Lokshin pioneered the use of the global positioning system in everyday life, bringing the satellite-based technology to boats, cars and eventually cellphones. Now, running a startup with his son, the Huntington Beach inventor wants to latch sophisticated motion sensors onto surfboards, skateboards, snowboards and regular clothing. Data collected by Lokshin's sensors could separate pros from posers in sports that typically emphasize imprecise metrics such as style points.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner
When Francesca Lia Block sat down to write her latest young adult novel, "Love in the Time of Global Warming" (Holt Books for Young Readers: 240 pp., $16.99), she took her beloved hometown of Los Angeles and destroyed it. But she didn't just destroy it. She burned it to the ground in the lyrical, hallucinogenic way in which she once elevated the very same city to celestial heights in her first novel, "Weetzie Bat," and all the adult and young adult fiction she's written since. We meet 17-year old Penelope, the book's protagonist, briefly during the catastrophic environmental event that she calls the "earth shaker," and then in earnest two weeks later, adjusting to a new reality.
WORLD
August 11, 2013 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - With his pouty lips and soulful eyes, he was a stylish figure known as the King of Romance, a crooner of amorous ballads often seen cavorting with would-be starlets in MTV-style videos filmed on yachts, in upscale cafes and in swank homes. But Fadel Shaker's latest video - without a note uttered - may become his swan song, portraying the balladeer in a new and disturbing incarnation: hunkered down defiantly with a militant sheik and his armed followers, holding out against Lebanese soldiers he derided as dogs and pigs.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Well, what do you know, we had a quake, and we had a warning too. As my colleague Joseph Serna reported Wednesday:  An earthquake early warning system being tested in California gave seismologists in Pasadena up to 30 seconds to prepare for Monday morning's temblor in the desert of Riverside County. “It was right,” said Kate Hutton, a seismologist with Caltech. “I sat really still to see if I could feel it and it worked.” Hopefully, Hutton was saying that without surprise in her voice.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Deep-pocketed bartenders in need of some extra pockets, the backpack of your dreams is here: Gin & Luck , a "lifestyle brand" created by bar consultant Proprietors LLC , introduces its first accessory "for the epicurean lifestyle. " It's a bag for carrying your bar tools and a couple of bottles of booze. It costs $395. (Think about it -- that's only 40 days of under-$10 lunches.) What you're paying for: heavyweight canvas, leather, nickel-plated hardware and waterproof compartments; a 1,540-cubic-inch main compartment that includes a lined pocket for a 15-inch laptop; a toolkit and shaker sleeve; and two side pockets that hold a 750-ml bottle each (there are holes in the flaps that allow the necks and tops of the bottle to stick out)
BUSINESS
April 4, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
How about a margarita with that matzo ball? Until recently, syrupy sweet wine was a staple of the Passover Seder, the ritual meal that celebrates the liberation of the ancient Israelites from slavery in Egypt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | Connie Benesch
That 6.1 earthquake Oct. 1 also provided a mild jolt to video rentals of Universal's 1974 block-shaker "Earthquake," which wasn't exactly shaking up customers previously, according to several local retailers. "It's out now," said Monique Leigh of Off the Record Video in Sherman Oaks. "Even the day of the earthquake, somebody rented it that night. It never rented before, to be honest. Maybe twice every six months was the tops." Alan Forbes Jr.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Those of us who live in California can get a little snarky about earthquakes. Maine had a 4.0 earthquake? Oh, that's tough, quake-nonchalant Californians might be tempted to say.  Heard of Loma Prieta, 1989? San Fernando, '71? San Francisco, 1906? But, Californians, here's something you should know: Earthquakes are  different on the East Coast.  A 4.0 back East might jolt more people over a much wider area and, by some measures, could be a much more intense experience. "On the East Coast and in the Midwest, where they have an earthquake that they feel once every seven or eight years, it 's a big deal to them," California state geologist John Parrish told the Los Angeles Times in an interview Wednesday.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Just as the U.S. hotel industry begins to recover from the recession, industry leaders say they are being sabotaged by the Obama administration. The charge centers on a new rule proposed by Obama's Office of Government Ethics that would prohibit most federal employees from accepting free admission to conferences and other gatherings held by businesses or organizations that lobby the government. The American Hotel & Lodging Assn., the trade group that represents the nation's hotels, blasted the proposed rule, saying it is unneeded and would prevent federal employees from mingling with people to learn about trends and problems in the country.
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