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July 12, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shakespeare Festival/LA has been awarded a $20,000 grant, the largest of 13 awarded in an arts funding program administered by Los Angeles County. The festival was recently denied a grant by the Los Angeles Arts Endowment, which is administered by the city of Los Angeles. City fund officials cited a lack of documentation of the "cultural diversity" of the company and its efforts to serve "the under-served community."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2005 | Don Shirley
"The Comedy of Errors" at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels? Shakespeare Festival/LA is bringing Shakespeare's rowdy gagfest to the plaza of the downtown center of L.A.'s Roman Catholic community July 27 to 31. For those unfamiliar with the play, it's based on a pagan Roman precursor. Although it's set in Ephesus, its tone is hardly that of the New Testament's Ephesians. Its characters are far from celibate, and its moral is far from discernible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Ben Donenberg, producing artistic director of Shakespeare Festival / LA, is aware of the irony. Perched on a couch in a sequestered nook of the historical downtown bastion known as the L.A. Athletic Club, the producer can't help but savor the incongruity. After all, this is hardly the kind of setting in which you'd expect to find one of L.A.'s most successful theatrical populists.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2005 | Don Shirley
The site of Shakespeare Festival/LA's free alfresco performances this summer will be the plaza of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, where the company will present the New York-based Aquila Theatre Company's "The Comedy of Errors," July 27 through 30. The festival had to leave Pershing Square, which it had used for the last five summers, because of cuts in the city's Department of Recreation and Parks budget, but downtown L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central Park, on a summer evening in 1981. A not-yet-famous John Goodman and Mandy Patinkin were dueling during a dress rehearsal for the New York Shakespeare Festival's "Henry IV, Part One," directed by the not-yet-famous Des McAnuff. Suddenly the sword flew out of Goodman's hand and appeared to land on the noggin of an even more obscure young actor named Benjamin Donenberg. The festival's legendary producer, Joseph Papp, dashed onstage and asked Donenberg if he was OK.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2005 | Don Shirley
The site of Shakespeare Festival/LA's free alfresco performances this summer will be the plaza of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, where the company will present the New York-based Aquila Theatre Company's "The Comedy of Errors," July 27 through 30. The festival had to leave Pershing Square, which it had used for the last five summers, because of cuts in the city's Department of Recreation and Parks budget, but downtown L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2005 | Don Shirley
Shakespeare Festival/LA is scrambling to find the money to pay for a new venue for its free downtown performances this summer, in the wake of a decision by the Department of Recreation and Parks to withdraw city funding for the use of Pershing Square, the organization's venue since 2000. The festival's producing artistic director, Ben Donenberg, said that finding a venue is less a problem than finding the money to pay the show's running costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2005 | Don Shirley
"The Comedy of Errors" at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels? Shakespeare Festival/LA is bringing Shakespeare's rowdy gagfest to the plaza of the downtown center of L.A.'s Roman Catholic community July 27 to 31. For those unfamiliar with the play, it's based on a pagan Roman precursor. Although it's set in Ephesus, its tone is hardly that of the New Testament's Ephesians. Its characters are far from celibate, and its moral is far from discernible.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a June 30 deadline draws near, several organizations have expressed interest in becoming a part of the municipal theater center on downtown's Spring Street. But none have dealt conclusively with the issue of who will pay the bills, a major factor in the demise of its former occupant, the Los Angeles Theatre Center company. The interim management of the center by the city's Cultural Affairs Department is scheduled to end on June 30, according to a plan adopted last year by the City Council.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
Shakespeare Festival / LA, a mostly itinerant troupe for 16 years, is planning a home of its own and a major redesign of the company, said producing artistic director Ben Donenberg. "We're becoming an institution," Donenberg said. And this institution will have a permanent mid-size theater on the western edge of downtown Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2005 | Don Shirley
Shakespeare Festival/LA is scrambling to find the money to pay for a new venue for its free downtown performances this summer, in the wake of a decision by the Department of Recreation and Parks to withdraw city funding for the use of Pershing Square, the organization's venue since 2000. The festival's producing artistic director, Ben Donenberg, said that finding a venue is less a problem than finding the money to pay the show's running costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Navy recruiters might want to take potential officers to Brendon Fox's staging of "Much Ado About Nothing," produced by Shakespeare Festival/LA. The production is set at a cushy country club that appears to be near an American naval base. Young male officers and the daughters of the local brass frolic around the hot tub, the tennis courts and the golf course. The concept blended perfectly with the production's initial alfresco venue, at Burton Chace Park in Marina del Rey, last weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
Shakespeare Festival / LA, a mostly itinerant troupe for 16 years, is planning a home of its own and a major redesign of the company, said producing artistic director Ben Donenberg. "We're becoming an institution," Donenberg said. And this institution will have a permanent mid-size theater on the western edge of downtown Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Ben Donenberg, producing artistic director of Shakespeare Festival / LA, is aware of the irony. Perched on a couch in a sequestered nook of the historical downtown bastion known as the L.A. Athletic Club, the producer can't help but savor the incongruity. After all, this is hardly the kind of setting in which you'd expect to find one of L.A.'s most successful theatrical populists.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1998 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
On a recent afternoon, in a borrowed rehearsal space at the Village at Ed Gould Plaza in Hollywood, cast members from the latest production from Shakespeare Festival/LA waved arms and bare tree branches, toiling and troubling their way through that popular Shakespeare scene that is part weird magic, part cooking show: the witches stirring the caldron in "Macbeth." Just add eye of newt, tongue of frog and bring to a boil; serves three.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1998 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
Sitting in the library of the unfinished theater he's underwriting in North Hollywood, Dakin Matthews is surrounded by scripts. The stories call out, pleading to be told. Or that's the way it seems, at least, as Matthews--an actor, director, dramaturge, playwright and theater administrator--talks about the importance of drama, and classic drama in particular.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Navy recruiters might want to take potential officers to Brendon Fox's staging of "Much Ado About Nothing," produced by Shakespeare Festival/LA. The production is set at a cushy country club that appears to be near an American naval base. Young male officers and the daughters of the local brass frolic around the hot tub, the tennis courts and the golf course. The concept blended perfectly with the production's initial alfresco venue, at Burton Chace Park in Marina del Rey, last weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shrew is tamed too soon in Shakespeare Festival/LA's "The Taming of the Shrew," now at the Japanese Gardens on the Veterans Administration grounds in West Los Angeles (and soon to appear Downtown and in Pasadena). Susan Hegarty's Katherine spits fire in her first encounter with Richard Ziman's Petruchio. But in the wedding scene she takes Shakespeare's stage direction "exit weeping" far too literally as she stomps off in exasperation when Petruchio still hasn't shown up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1997 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew Tsao apparently was inspired by the Cirque du Soleil and vaudeville styles of the early 20th century in his staging of "The Tempest." It's an attractive blend, supported by sterling characterizations. Yet it doesn't fit smoothly into Shakespeare Festival/LA's latest primary venue, the Watercourt at California Plaza in downtown Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shrew is tamed too soon in Shakespeare Festival/LA's "The Taming of the Shrew," now at the Japanese Gardens on the Veterans Administration grounds in West Los Angeles (and soon to appear Downtown and in Pasadena). Susan Hegarty's Katherine spits fire in her first encounter with Richard Ziman's Petruchio. But in the wedding scene she takes Shakespeare's stage direction "exit weeping" far too literally as she stomps off in exasperation when Petruchio still hasn't shown up.
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