Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShale Gas
IN THE NEWS

Shale Gas

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 9, 2010 | By Steve Gelsi
Chevron Corp. said Tuesday that it would buy Atlas Energy Inc. for $3.2 billion in cash as the oil giant bolsters its market position in the U.S. shale-gas business. Stockholders of Pittsburgh-based Atlas Energy will receive $38.25 in cash for each of their shares, Chevron said, plus $5.09 a share to reflect the value of Atlas Energy's stake in Atlas Pipeline Holdings, for a total purchase price of $43.34 a share. The deal includes the assumption of $1.1 billion in debt. "This acquisition is the right opportunity for Chevron," said George Kirkland, the San Ramon, Calif.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By Pascal Bruckner
PARIS - Not long ago, I attended a colloquium of French scientists and philosophers in Corsica, France, called "How to Think About the Future. " With few exceptions, the astrophysicists, economists, physicians and social theorists on hand offered dark visions of tomorrow. A new financial crisis, water and grain shortages, endless war, a general collapse of ecosystems - we were spared no catastrophic scenario. A month earlier, I had been invited by the environmentalist think tank Breakthrough to San Francisco, where I reflected with a group of thinkers on the Schumpeterian economic idea of "creative destruction" and its application to energy production.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
In his State of the Union speech, President Obama made no mention of his controversial decision to reject the Keystone XL oil pipeline, but shifted his focus to shale gas development, another contentious topic where the promise of badly needed near-term jobs clashes with widespread fears of environmental damage. "We have a supply of natural gas that can last America nearly 100 years, and my administration will take every possible action to safely develop this energy," he said. "Experts believe this will support more than 600,000 jobs by the end of the decade.
WORLD
August 30, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
BUENOS AIRES - When the Argentine oil company YPF announced two years ago that it had discovered some of the world's largest reserves of shale gas and oil on a barren plain in Patagonia, many began looking to the energy industry as the answer to Argentina's financial woes. The country's growing dependence on foreign fuel has been a main driver of economic instability. Oil and gas imports have drained currency reserves, and large energy subsidies have contributed to a soaring inflation rate.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to regulate wastewater discharged by companies producing natural gas from shale formations, including chemically laced water used in a controversial extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing. The EPA's initiative comes as water-intensive natural gas production has spread around the country, raising concerns about the effects on drinking-water supplies. The practice, also known as fracking, involves shooting water infused with chemicals and sand at high pressure into shale formations to unlock reservoirs of natural gas. The EPA will try to determine what to do with water used during fracking, as well as water that is already underground and flows back up the well.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
A federally-appointed panel recommended greater disclosure and monitoring of the environmental effects of extracting natural gas from shale formations, marking the Obama administration's first broad assessment of the controversial practice known as fracking. A coast-to-coast shale gas boom has raised concerns about the risks to underground water supplies from hydraulic fracturing, which involves mixing sand, water and chemicals and injecting them into shale formations at high pressure to unlock the gas. Environmental groups, local residents and politicians in areas rich with shale gas have said that hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," could lead to contamination of the water table.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- Reserves of oil and gas that can be developed using current technology are 35% greater in 2013 than in 2011, according to a new report by the Energy Information Administration, the research branch of the Energy Department. The rise in estimated domestic reserves to 223 billion barrels of oil equivalents, which include crude oil and gas, stems in large part from the inclusion of reserves found in shale formations. Increased use of production methods such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, have made oil and gas trapped in tight geological formations economically recoverable.
OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By Pascal Bruckner
PARIS - Not long ago, I attended a colloquium of French scientists and philosophers in Corsica, France, called "How to Think About the Future. " With few exceptions, the astrophysicists, economists, physicians and social theorists on hand offered dark visions of tomorrow. A new financial crisis, water and grain shortages, endless war, a general collapse of ecosystems - we were spared no catastrophic scenario. A month earlier, I had been invited by the environmentalist think tank Breakthrough to San Francisco, where I reflected with a group of thinkers on the Schumpeterian economic idea of "creative destruction" and its application to energy production.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
Compared to the rest of Ohio, Marysville is booming. Honda of America recently announced plans to build a new version of the Acura NSX sports car near its gargantuan plant here. Unemployment in Union County, where Marysville is located, is just 6.2%. Union County was one of the few places in Ohio to grow in population between 2000 and 2010. Yet business owners casting their vote in the GOP primary say the economy isn't improving quickly enough, suggesting that even in areas relatively immune to the economic downturn, the specter of rising gas prices and uncertainty still looms large.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Environmental activists showed off a new form of protest throughout the country and around the world Saturday: a "Global Frackdown. " On Saturday, activists at roughly 100 events around the globe were scheduled to protest a controversial oil and gas extraction practice called hydraulic fracturing or fracking. Organizers dubbed their activities in North America, Europe and Australia a " Global Frackdown. " More than 50 Code Pink members gathered near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- Reserves of oil and gas that can be developed using current technology are 35% greater in 2013 than in 2011, according to a new report by the Energy Information Administration, the research branch of the Energy Department. The rise in estimated domestic reserves to 223 billion barrels of oil equivalents, which include crude oil and gas, stems in large part from the inclusion of reserves found in shale formations. Increased use of production methods such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, have made oil and gas trapped in tight geological formations economically recoverable.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A coalition of energy companies, environmentalists and Pennsylvania philanthropies have created a new center that would provide more stringent standards for fracking of natural gas in parts of the eastern United States. The new Center for Sustainable Shale Development, the first of its kind in the U.S., seeks to set high operational standards for companies in the Marcellus Shale formation to boost water, air quality and climate protections, the coalition announced Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," has become an increasingly divisive issue over the last few years, with claims of damage to local water supplies and other health and environmental concerns dogging the process to extract natural gas from deep underground. The new documentary "FrackNation," directed by Phelim McAleer, Ann McElhinney and Magdalena Segieda, looks to directly take on the Oscar-nominated anti-fracking doc "Gasland," pointing a finger toward that film and its director, Josh Fox, for any subsequent controversy regarding fracking.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Environmental activists showed off a new form of protest throughout the country and around the world Saturday: a "Global Frackdown. " On Saturday, activists at roughly 100 events around the globe were scheduled to protest a controversial oil and gas extraction practice called hydraulic fracturing or fracking. Organizers dubbed their activities in North America, Europe and Australia a " Global Frackdown. " More than 50 Code Pink members gathered near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
Compared to the rest of Ohio, Marysville is booming. Honda of America recently announced plans to build a new version of the Acura NSX sports car near its gargantuan plant here. Unemployment in Union County, where Marysville is located, is just 6.2%. Union County was one of the few places in Ohio to grow in population between 2000 and 2010. Yet business owners casting their vote in the GOP primary say the economy isn't improving quickly enough, suggesting that even in areas relatively immune to the economic downturn, the specter of rising gas prices and uncertainty still looms large.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
In his State of the Union speech, President Obama made no mention of his controversial decision to reject the Keystone XL oil pipeline, but shifted his focus to shale gas development, another contentious topic where the promise of badly needed near-term jobs clashes with widespread fears of environmental damage. "We have a supply of natural gas that can last America nearly 100 years, and my administration will take every possible action to safely develop this energy," he said. "Experts believe this will support more than 600,000 jobs by the end of the decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," has become an increasingly divisive issue over the last few years, with claims of damage to local water supplies and other health and environmental concerns dogging the process to extract natural gas from deep underground. The new documentary "FrackNation," directed by Phelim McAleer, Ann McElhinney and Magdalena Segieda, looks to directly take on the Oscar-nominated anti-fracking doc "Gasland," pointing a finger toward that film and its director, Josh Fox, for any subsequent controversy regarding fracking.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A coalition of energy companies, environmentalists and Pennsylvania philanthropies have created a new center that would provide more stringent standards for fracking of natural gas in parts of the eastern United States. The new Center for Sustainable Shale Development, the first of its kind in the U.S., seeks to set high operational standards for companies in the Marcellus Shale formation to boost water, air quality and climate protections, the coalition announced Wednesday.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to regulate wastewater discharged by companies producing natural gas from shale formations, including chemically laced water used in a controversial extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing. The EPA's initiative comes as water-intensive natural gas production has spread around the country, raising concerns about the effects on drinking-water supplies. The practice, also known as fracking, involves shooting water infused with chemicals and sand at high pressure into shale formations to unlock reservoirs of natural gas. The EPA will try to determine what to do with water used during fracking, as well as water that is already underground and flows back up the well.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
A federally-appointed panel recommended greater disclosure and monitoring of the environmental effects of extracting natural gas from shale formations, marking the Obama administration's first broad assessment of the controversial practice known as fracking. A coast-to-coast shale gas boom has raised concerns about the risks to underground water supplies from hydraulic fracturing, which involves mixing sand, water and chemicals and injecting them into shale formations at high pressure to unlock the gas. Environmental groups, local residents and politicians in areas rich with shale gas have said that hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," could lead to contamination of the water table.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|