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BUSINESS
March 6, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Shalek Agency grew up Monday. The Santa Monica ad firm was handed the estimated $20-million to $30-million account to buy broadcast commercial time and print and billboard advertising space for Fox Broadcasting Co. The account was handled until a year ago by giant Western International. Executives at Fox and Shalek declined to state the exact amount of billings. The win nearly doubles the 2-year-old agency's annual billings to $65 million.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Shalek Agency grew up Monday. The Santa Monica ad firm was handed the estimated $20-million to $30-million account to buy broadcast commercial time and print and billboard advertising space for Fox Broadcasting Co. The account was handled until a year ago by giant Western International. Executives at Fox and Shalek declined to state the exact amount of billings. The win nearly doubles the 2-year-old agency's annual billings to $65 million.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
An ad for Honda that poked fun at the super-secret stealth bomber flew off Thursday night with the West Coast's most prestigious advertising award. American Honda Motor Co.'s print ad, which compared the design of a Honda subcompact to that of the highly sophisticated stealth bomber, won the top prize at the 23rd annual Belding Awards at the Century Plaza Hotel. The competition--which received 1,750 entries--is regarded as the West Coast equivalent of New York's top ad awards, the Clios.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1989
Perhaps President Bush's notion of a kinder, gentler nation is taking root already. Southern California Edison Co. reports that contributions during the first six weeks of its 1988-89 Winter Energy Assistance Fund campaign are 25% ahead of last year's total for the entire campaign. An Edison spokesman said its customers have contributed $450,000 to the fund, which provides emergency funds to pay electric bills for poor residential customers who are handicapped or disabled.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Michael Albright has one speciality: wacky ideas. It was Albright, after all, who three years ago had the brainstorm to feature a little-known comedian, Roseanne Barr, in off-beat TV commercials for a new grocery chain called the Giant. "It's the opposite of what all the other supermarkets were doing," said Albright, who spotted Barr in an HBO television special. "No one else had a fat, cynical woman as a spokesman."
BUSINESS
April 11, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The third New York advertising agency within a week has revealed its intention to open an office in Southern California. This time, however, the agency, Deutsch Inc., said its office will not just be set up to service current clients, but also to get into the scramble for new business. Deutsch is regarded by many as one of the hottest creative shops in New York. It may be best known for its hip commercials for the new magazine Entertainment Weekly that advise people to "Kick back. Chill out.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear is looking for an agency to fit the shoe. The Los Angeles athletic shoe maker has quietly launched a review for an agency to create ads for a new, high-tech line of athletic shoe. Whatever agency is selected could eventually end up with the creative portion of the company's $68-million annual ad business. "L.A. Gear wants its advertising to be the best there is," said Michael Albright, the former creative director of the Shalek Agency, who last week was named creative director of L.A.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Yet another major out-of-town advertising agency, W. B. Doner & Co., has closed its Los Angeles office. The agency, which has headquarters in both suburban Detroit and Baltimore, on Thursday abruptly closed its Los Angeles office nearly nine years after it opened. This marks the third big out-of-town agency to close its Los Angeles division in less than a year. Last month, the new ad firm Scali, McCabe, Sloves announced plans to close its Los Angeles office.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The room got strangely quiet. At most advertising agencies, that is usually a sign that a client had been lost. But that was hardly the case at the tiny ad firm Stein Robaire Helm. The Los Angeles agency was just weeks old and operating out of a converted apartment with a kitchen that doubled as a conference room. On the kitchen table, Jean Robaire and John Stein had just completed an advertisement for their first client, a wheelchair maker. The unusual ad--which has since appeared in several specialty magazines--has text that winds around everyday obstacles to show the sort of barriers people in wheelchairs face each day. As the two creators stared at the ad, Greg Helm, the agency's president, walked into the room.
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