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Shambala Preserve

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NEWS
December 13, 1990 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What could be more frightening than being pecked by a flock of Alfred Hitchcock's blood-thirsty birds? Maybe coming face to face with a Siberian tiger, or a five-ton elephant that's been known to charge passing trains? Apparently not. Tippi Hedren, the actress perhaps best known as the schoolteacher attacked by Hitchcock's killer crows in the classic thriller "The Birds," is at home--literally--among the 60 or so snarling cats and two elephants at her Shambala Preserve in the Antelope Valley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2009 | Robert J. Lopez and My-Thuan Tran
As firefighters continued to battle flames from the Station fire Monday, founders of an exotic animal reserve north of Los Angeles attempted to evacuate hundreds of tigers, bears, lions and other animals as similar facilities in Acton have chosen to keep their beasts in place. At the Wildlife Waystation, workers and a stream of volunteers worked late Monday night to evacuate more than 200 animals sheltered at the refuge in Little Tujunga Canyon. In media interviews throughout the afternoon, staff pleaded for trucks to help evacuate the animals as flames raged nearby.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1994 | BOB THOMAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Tippi Hedren was jolted awake by the Jan. 17 earthquake, her first thoughts were like something out of "Jurassic Park." "Are the gates holding? Are the fences holding?" She was alarmed because behind the gates and fences of her Shambala Preserve here, about 25 miles from the epicenter, reside 76 big cats from the veldts and jungles of Africa and Asia. Fortunately, all of the enclosures held firm. "The cats took it all in stride," the actress reported.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 2001
If a real African safari isn't an option, you can still have a game park experience without leaving Southern California at actress Tippi Hedren's Shambala Preserve in Soledad Canyon, where the wild animals are just outside your safari tent. Hedren, who starred in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" and "Marnie," created the 72-acre game park in 1983 as a haven for abandoned, abused and unwanted exotic animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1997 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds," Tippi Hedren's character takes quite a pecking. But the actress' relationship with the animal kingdom has always been a harmonious and loving one. In 1983, she established the Shambala Preserve, a 60-acre habitat in Acton, Calif., for more than 60 big cats, from African lions and Bengal tigers to cheetahs and Asian leopards. Keeping them fed requires continual fund-raising, which brings Hedren to the Irvine Improv on Sunday night.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 2001
If a real African safari isn't an option, you can still have a game park experience without leaving Southern California at actress Tippi Hedren's Shambala Preserve in Soledad Canyon, where the wild animals are just outside your safari tent. Hedren, who starred in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" and "Marnie," created the 72-acre game park in 1983 as a haven for abandoned, abused and unwanted exotic animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as it has countless times before, the U.S. Marine Corps on Saturday rushed in to offer its brawn--this time to a pair of elephants whose Acton stomping grounds were washed away by last month's rainstorms. Kura and Timbo, African elephants who live at the private Shambala African Preserve, have been without their play yard since the Santa Clara River overflowed its banks during the heavy rains three weeks ago, washing out a dirt road and littering the usually dry channel with brush and junk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hardly the entourage expected of a king, or even a former king. To begin his tour of Southern California, King Kigeli V of Rwanda arrived at a wildlife preserve in Acton in a Honda Civic--hardly regal or even comfortable transportation for this seven-foot-tall man who has been in exile for 34 years. With him was only one aide, who serves as his secretary and counselor. But the exiled king--now living in a suburb of Arlington, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2009 | Robert J. Lopez and My-Thuan Tran
As firefighters continued to battle flames from the Station fire Monday, founders of an exotic animal reserve north of Los Angeles attempted to evacuate hundreds of tigers, bears, lions and other animals as similar facilities in Acton have chosen to keep their beasts in place. At the Wildlife Waystation, workers and a stream of volunteers worked late Monday night to evacuate more than 200 animals sheltered at the refuge in Little Tujunga Canyon. In media interviews throughout the afternoon, staff pleaded for trucks to help evacuate the animals as flames raged nearby.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1996
Tippi Hedren and Ken Howard will perform a staged reading of A.R. Gurney's romantic play "Love Letters," at the Stella Adler Theatre in Hollywood on Aug. 25 at 7 p.m., as a benefit for Hedren's Shambala Preserve, a nonprofit wildlife preserve for big cats. Tax-deductible tickets are $50 and include a champagne reception. Reservations: (213) 465-4446.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1997 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds," Tippi Hedren's character takes quite a pecking. But the actress' relationship with the animal kingdom has always been a harmonious and loving one. In 1983, she established the Shambala Preserve, a 60-acre habitat in Acton, Calif., for more than 60 big cats, from African lions and Bengal tigers to cheetahs and Asian leopards. Keeping them fed requires continual fund-raising, which brings Hedren to the Irvine Improv on Sunday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hardly the entourage expected of a king, or even a former king. To begin his tour of Southern California, King Kigeli V of Rwanda arrived at a wildlife preserve in Acton in a Honda Civic--hardly regal or even comfortable transportation for this seven-foot-tall man who has been in exile for 34 years. With him was only one aide, who serves as his secretary and counselor. But the exiled king--now living in a suburb of Arlington, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1994 | BOB THOMAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Tippi Hedren was jolted awake by the Jan. 17 earthquake, her first thoughts were like something out of "Jurassic Park." "Are the gates holding? Are the fences holding?" She was alarmed because behind the gates and fences of her Shambala Preserve here, about 25 miles from the epicenter, reside 76 big cats from the veldts and jungles of Africa and Asia. Fortunately, all of the enclosures held firm. "The cats took it all in stride," the actress reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as it has countless times before, the U.S. Marine Corps on Saturday rushed in to offer its brawn--this time to a pair of elephants whose Acton stomping grounds were washed away by last month's rainstorms. Kura and Timbo, African elephants who live at the private Shambala African Preserve, have been without their play yard since the Santa Clara River overflowed its banks during the heavy rains three weeks ago, washing out a dirt road and littering the usually dry channel with brush and junk.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What could be more frightening than being pecked by a flock of Alfred Hitchcock's blood-thirsty birds? Maybe coming face to face with a Siberian tiger, or a five-ton elephant that's been known to charge passing trains? Apparently not. Tippi Hedren, the actress perhaps best known as the schoolteacher attacked by Hitchcock's killer crows in the classic thriller "The Birds," is at home--literally--among the 60 or so snarling cats and two elephants at her Shambala Preserve in the Antelope Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1990 | LIBBY SLATE
Tippi Hedren, best known for her roles in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" and "Marnie," is emoting in another sort of suspense genre: She has joined the cast of CBS' "The Bold and the Beautiful" as Helen Maclaine, a newspaper columnist. "I'd always said 'No' to the soaps, but when my agent called about this one, I thought it might be kind of fun," says Hedren. Hitchcock discovered her on a Sego diet-drink commercial and signed her for his 1963 release, "The Birds."
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