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Shambhala

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NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
PortAventura theme park in Spain plans to debut a record-setting $35-million mountain climbing-themed roller coaster in spring 2012 featuring a series of camelback hills, pitch-black tunnels and a water element. > Photos: Spain's PortAventura unveils 2012 roller coaster The roller coaster, or " montaña rusa " in Spanish, is expected to be named after the mythical Tibetan kingdom of Shambhala, according to Roller Coaster Database . The Bollinger & Mabillard-built ride will be the tallest (249 feet)
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NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
PortAventura theme park in Spain plans to debut a record-setting $35-million mountain climbing-themed roller coaster in spring 2012 featuring a series of camelback hills, pitch-black tunnels and a water element. > Photos: Spain's PortAventura unveils 2012 roller coaster The roller coaster, or " montaña rusa " in Spanish, is expected to be named after the mythical Tibetan kingdom of Shambhala, according to Roller Coaster Database . The Bollinger & Mabillard-built ride will be the tallest (249 feet)
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BOOKS
May 18, 1986 | Victoria Scott, Scott is an MA in Buddhist studies from Yale. and
The first Buddhist masters to come to America at the turn of the century did so because they felt that Zen had entered a period of decline in Japan; although monasteries remained open to all, those who applied were interested in the logistics of running the family temple more than in attaining enlightenment. Whether these teachers' faith in American practitioners is justified is the most important question raised by this latest of Peter Matthiessen's books.
BOOKS
August 22, 2004 | Nick Owchar, Nick Owchar is acting deputy editor of Book Review.
One of Christianity's first hippies was a hermit named Anthony. He didn't preach free love or drug experimentation, he simply turned his back on conformity. In the Egyptian desert of the 4th century, this son of peasant farmers cultivated a "society of one" that developed into a powerful form of civil disobedience, James Cowan writes in "Desert Father." You might even say that every activist in the '60s or today has benefited in some way from St. Anthony's efforts.
BOOKS
August 16, 1987 | H. V. Vinters
The stated purpose of this ambitious, complex, and often exasperatingly opaque treatise is nothing less than the construction of a new paradigm for the "medical enterprise."
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | ALAN LIGHTMAN
In the monastery of San Michele di Murano, a boat ride from Venice, a 16th century monk sits in his cell. By candlelight, he works on his map of the world, his "Orbis Terrae Compendiosa Descriptio." Gleaned from the stories of travelers and traders, missionaries and scholars, it is a map not only of coastlines and mountains but also of strange peoples and customs. In this charming short novel, James Cowan has created a set of mythical travel reports.
BOOKS
August 22, 2004 | Nick Owchar, Nick Owchar is acting deputy editor of Book Review.
One of Christianity's first hippies was a hermit named Anthony. He didn't preach free love or drug experimentation, he simply turned his back on conformity. In the Egyptian desert of the 4th century, this son of peasant farmers cultivated a "society of one" that developed into a powerful form of civil disobedience, James Cowan writes in "Desert Father." You might even say that every activist in the '60s or today has benefited in some way from St. Anthony's efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2001 | PETER CLOTHIER, Peter Clothier is the author, most recently, of "While I Am Not Afraid: Secrets of a Man's Heart."
Though she would have no way to know it, Pema Chodron has been an important teacher for me. I first got acquainted with her when I picked up a copy of "When Things Fall Apart"--perhaps her best-known work--pretty much at random in a bookshop in Ojai several years ago. Having only recently found myself curious about the teachings of Buddhism, I had not previously encountered the work of this Tibetan-trained American nun.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2003 | Kim Chernin, Special to The Times
When Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden, they were given a gift. God, taking compassion on their loneliness and their exile, gave them tears to heal their grief. This Talmudic parable does not open Miriam Greenspan's thoughtful and compelling book "Healing Through the Dark Emotions: The Wisdom of Grief, Fear, and Despair," but it could, for it encapsulates her fundamental teaching that in the depth of our despair lies our healing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Imagination is a mysterious faculty, essential not only to the creation of art but also to the life of the mind itself. As the author of many acclaimed works of science fiction (perhaps a more accurate term would be fantasy), Ursula K. Le Guin knows a great deal about the workings of imagination and how important it is in transforming the raw material of experience into something new and strange.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Imagination is a mysterious faculty, essential not only to the creation of art but also to the life of the mind itself. As the author of many acclaimed works of science fiction (perhaps a more accurate term would be fantasy), Ursula K. Le Guin knows a great deal about the workings of imagination and how important it is in transforming the raw material of experience into something new and strange.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2003 | Kim Chernin, Special to The Times
When Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden, they were given a gift. God, taking compassion on their loneliness and their exile, gave them tears to heal their grief. This Talmudic parable does not open Miriam Greenspan's thoughtful and compelling book "Healing Through the Dark Emotions: The Wisdom of Grief, Fear, and Despair," but it could, for it encapsulates her fundamental teaching that in the depth of our despair lies our healing.
NEWS
March 9, 2002 | RUTH ANDREW ELLENSON
Would the Tibetan Book of the Dead by any other name be as popular? That's one question that Francesca Fremantle's thoughtful and intricate "Luminous Emptiness" brings to mind. The real title for what we call the Tibetan Book of the Dead is the less melodic "The Great Liberation Through Hearing During the Bardo."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2001 | PETER CLOTHIER, Peter Clothier is the author, most recently, of "While I Am Not Afraid: Secrets of a Man's Heart."
Though she would have no way to know it, Pema Chodron has been an important teacher for me. I first got acquainted with her when I picked up a copy of "When Things Fall Apart"--perhaps her best-known work--pretty much at random in a bookshop in Ojai several years ago. Having only recently found myself curious about the teachings of Buddhism, I had not previously encountered the work of this Tibetan-trained American nun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | PETER CLOTHIER, Peter Clothier is the author of "While I Am Not Afraid: Secrets of a Man's Heart."
I thought about my late father often as I read "Saffron Days in L.A." Like the author, Bhante Walpola Piyananda, he was "a man of the cloth"--though separated by a vast cultural divide from this Sri Lankan, who has been abbot of the Dharma Vijaya Buddhist Vihara, a meditation center in Los Angeles, for the last quarter-century. My father habitually wore the black cassock of an Anglican minister; Piyananda writes of his experiences wearing the saffron of a Buddhist monk.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | ALAN LIGHTMAN
In the monastery of San Michele di Murano, a boat ride from Venice, a 16th century monk sits in his cell. By candlelight, he works on his map of the world, his "Orbis Terrae Compendiosa Descriptio." Gleaned from the stories of travelers and traders, missionaries and scholars, it is a map not only of coastlines and mountains but also of strange peoples and customs. In this charming short novel, James Cowan has created a set of mythical travel reports.
NEWS
March 9, 2002 | RUTH ANDREW ELLENSON
Would the Tibetan Book of the Dead by any other name be as popular? That's one question that Francesca Fremantle's thoughtful and intricate "Luminous Emptiness" brings to mind. The real title for what we call the Tibetan Book of the Dead is the less melodic "The Great Liberation Through Hearing During the Bardo."
BOOKS
July 2, 1989 | Russell Jacoby, Jacoby's latest book, "The Last Intellectuals," recently appeared in paper (Hill & Wang/Noonday); he currently teaches at UC Riverside. and
No one who writes of nuclear war can be accused of tackling a small issue. To be sure, neither the courage nor the books are in short supply. We pay attention to these books, however, in fits and starts, depending on the state of the world. The Reagan Administration--until its final years--spoke of evil empires and winning nuclear wars. If this gave rise to nightmares, it was good for books on nuclear disaster. The nuclear freeze movement of 1982-84, itself a product of these renewed fears, provoked Jeff Smith to reflect upon the nuclear debate; his book seeks to go beyond the usual policy discussions to a more illuminating cultural dimension.
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