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Shame

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011
'Shame' MPAA rating: NC-17 for some explicit sexual content Running time: 1 hour, 39 minutes Playing: At ArcLight Cinemas, Hollywood; the Landmark, West Los Angeles
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WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
ANSAN, South Korea - For South Korea, a country that pulled itself out of abject poverty to become the world's 15th-largest economy, the most stinging accusation about last week's ferry sinking is that it looks like a Third-World disaster. While the captain escaped and the crew dithered and bickered with emergency officials, hundreds of passengers, most of them high school students, obediently remained in their cabins as the ferry rolled and slipped beneath the surface of the cold, gray sea. Mistake piled atop mistake turned a near-shore mishap into the nation's worst maritime disaster in decades.
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TRAVEL
December 17, 1989
Have you no shame? Is nothing sacred? Two years ago you wrote an excellent article on Strasbourg, the beautiful city in Alsace (April 24, 1988). You spoke of La Petite Francaise, the cathedral, the boat ride on the L'ille River. And, there is the European Parliament, which is worthy of a visit. Please, sir, no more. The Route du Vin (by Jerry Hulse, Dec. 3, 1989) will become as (crowded as) the Hollywood Freeway and as popular as Disneyland. Leave us in peace, please. Wines, cheese, French bread, chocolates and our beautiful countryside may be all that is left of civilization.
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Fancy this: In a city known for its car culture, Angelenos care deeply about their sidewalks. Every time the issue of fixing L.A.'s thousands of miles of neglected walkways gets tackled in the opinion or news pages, at least a dozen readers (not a huge amount, but more than on the average topic) fume about their experiences negotiating sidewalks buckled by massive tree roots or just wear and tear. In response to an editorial  and a news article this week on the city sitting on a $10-million fund for sidewalk repair, 22 readers wrote letters imploring L.A. to take action or offering their advice for improving the walking experience here.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Ted Rall
California is the No. 1 state in the United States for discouraging applicants for food stamps. The cause isn't ideology, it's confusing paperwork and bureaucracy. ALSO: Area 51: The real cover-up Can you hold the fries for one day for a fast-food wage protest? Georgia shooting: We tamper-proof Tylenol, but gun control is a no-go Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
OPINION
July 14, 2012
Re "This is about football," Column, July 13 Decent people are greatly in the debt of former FBI Director Louis Freeh and his team of investigators for conducting a truly independent investigation into the atrocities that occurred at Penn State University. The report is stunning and horrific, and it needs to be widely absorbed in the hope that what happened on such a grand scale at Penn State will never be allowed to occur anywhere else. There are many individuals in positions of authority who are culpable in enabling former football coach Jerry Sandusky to continue his crimes, but the late head coach Joe Paterno stands out as one whose actions, and lack of action, is particularly shameful.
OPINION
June 23, 2013
Re "Slaying on the Walk of Fame," June 20 Sadly, the killing of a woman who refused to pay $1 to panhandlers on Hollywood's Walk of Fame did not surprise me. I grew up in Los Angeles during the 1960s, when Hollywood Boulevard was fun. Fast forward to last April, when I was back there when a good friend got his "star," and I felt sorry for many of the tourists in the area. They were accosted by fairly aggressive "hucksters" who wanted money for pictures or were shoving handbills right in their faces.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2011
Love and Shame and Love Peter Orner Little, Brown: 439 pp., $24.99.
OPINION
September 23, 2012
Re "Death at Gitmo," Opinion, Sept. 20 Every time the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay is mentioned, no matter the context, I feel shame. We should all be ashamed at how this place continues to hold prisoners without trial in our names. I pray for the guards, for those incarcerated and for the pages this place occupies in our country's story. Why does this place still exist after all this time? It is a blight on us. Each time we celebrate the Fourth of July, Memorial Day and the birthdays of iconic presidents, I am appalled that this place of torture continues to exist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2011
No shame in opening Despite its restrictive NC-17 rating, "Shame" had a solid debut at the box office this weekend. The drama, which stars Michael Fassbender as a sex addict, grossed $361,181, according to an estimate from distributor Fox Searchlight. Its per-theater average of $36,118 is the third-highest for an NC-17 film in limited debut, behind Pedro Almodovar's "Bad Education" and Ang Lee's "Lust, Caution. " "NC-17 films always create a challenge, but the late shows were very strong," said Sheila DeLoach, the studio's executive vice president.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
BERKELEY - The Vienna Philharmonic is an orchestra that has always been gripped by as well as in the grip of history - the history of Western music, of which it has played a significant part, and the history of Vienna, of which it has also played a significant part. Now "Confronting the Past," has become an official project of the orchestra. In mannerly Viennese fashion, what the orchestra really means is confronting its past. That is what it did in a special residency as part of the UC Berkeley Cal Performances' series that included three concerts in Zellerbach Hall along with a two-day symposium examining the orchestra's history from the outbreak of World War I to the present.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Call it a case of PR trumping HR: After days of public shaming and ridicule for his decision to cut the value of his firm's employee retirement benefit -- and his rationalization for doing so -- AOL Chairman and Chief Executive Tim Armstrong has backed down. In a Saturday email to his fellow "AOLers,"  Armstrong said the company was changing its 401(k) match of up to 3% of wages back to its old system. The old way was to pay out the match every pay period. The new way was to pay it annually, at the end of the year, only to employees still with the company at that time.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
"Fifty Shades of ... Ana!" Actress Dakota Johnson assumed the character of B&D plaything Anastasia Steele for Elle magazine's March issue. The "50 Shades of Grey" star poses for the cover and inside spread wearing all the trappings of a boudoir babe: thigh-high stockings, sexy heels and that smoldering come-hither stare. Johnson poses on the cover bedside -- on her knees -- in a demure John Galliano frock juxtaposed with the headline: "Meet Dakota Johnson, the star of '50 Shades of Grey.'" PHOTOS: Meet the '50 Shades of Grey' cast & crew The shoot, it turns out, is several shades tamer than what the starlet is willing to do for the highly anticipated film based on E.L. James' erotica trilogy.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
This post has been corrected, as indicated below. Texas reproductive rights hero (and I really mean hero) Wendy Davis' children think she was a fine mother. End of discussion, right? Were that it were so, but Bristol Palin disagrees. On her blog about parenthood and faith, Palin wrote last week about the Texas gubernatorial candidate's past: "Actually, she found a man to marry her, pay her way through college, and then through Harvard Law School. The day after he paid the last bill, she left him. By the way, she left her kids too. She said, ' it's not a good time for me right now ' to be a parent.
WORLD
November 18, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The German bishop suspended by the Vatican last month for spending lavishly on foreign travel and furnishings for his $42-million residence renovation has paid a $27,000 fine to settle a court case brought against him for lying under oath. Bishop Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst of Limburg was accused by German prosecutors of bringing a false claim against Der Spiegel after the weekly news magazine reported that he had flown first class on trips to minister to slum-dwellers in India last year.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Thanks to the tenacity of the Fair Political Practices Commission, the names are now dribbling out of the campaign donors who secretly supported an anti-union measure and opposed a desperately needed tax increase on last year's California ballot. As one might expect, it's a disgraceful roster of billionaires intent on pulling up the ladder of advancement behind them. Charles Schwab. Eli Broad. B. Wayne Hughes (founder of Public Storage). The owners of the Gap. Sheldon Adelson of the Las Vegas Sands.
OPINION
October 23, 2011 | By Simon Garfield
Had enough of Steve Jobs yet? Me neither. How about that Stanford address? Still inspiring. I first came across it three years ago when a friend directed me toward the section where Jobs spoke about his passion for calligraphy and how this formed the basis of his fascination with typefaces. I thought: I have a fascination with typefaces too, but mine largely comes from using an early Mac. There they were, for free, that great spill of type history on the pull-down menu, ranging from Garamond (classic, fluid, slightly coarse 16th century French)
WORLD
October 17, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- When Savita Debnath was 14, two unknown men came to her impoverished village in eastern India, promising her a job cleaning houses for $40 a month in nearby Kolkata, but when she got there, agents forced her onto a train to New Delhi and sold her to a family. She was abused and forced to work long days cooking, cleaning, caring for two young children and preparing for family parties without pay or being allowed to contact her family. “I worked from 6 a.m. until midnight or 1 a.m.,” said Debnath, now 15. “When a dish burned, she slapped me many times.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Is it possible for a major news organization to produce a story about the Social Security disability program without interviewing a single disabled person or disability advocate? That's the experiment "60 Minutes" conducted Sunday. The result was predictably ghastly. The news program's theme was that disability recipients are ripping off the taxpayer. Anchor Steve Kroft called the program "a secret welfare system... ravaged by waste and fraud. " His chief source was Sen. Tom Coburn, an Oklahoma Republican with a documented hostility to Social Security . Coburn has a report on the disability program's purported flaws due out Monday.
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