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Shamil Basayev

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NEWS
June 18, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shamil Basayev, the guerrilla commander holding hundreds of hostages in a hospital in southern Russia, inherited a long and proud ancestral tradition of suicidal resistance to invaders of his native Chechnya. Central to that tradition was the Basayev family's two-story stone house--built in the year 1010 and now reportedly destroyed by Russian bombs--in the mountain village of Vedeno. In its defense, one Basayev ancestor fought the 14th-Century Central Asian warlord Tamerlane.
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WORLD
August 25, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Human rights activists expressed concern Thursday about a kidnapped Chechen journalist as information emerged that she was apparently married to a separatist leader killed in an explosion last month. Reporters Without Borders, a Paris-based group that campaigns for journalists' rights, said in a statement that Elina Ersenoyeva and her aunt had been abducted by gunmen on Aug. 17.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999
Re "Misguided War on Chechnya," editorial, Oct. 7: Your criticism of Russian foreign policy is absurd. You suggest that the "sensible" thing for Moscow to do was to work with Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov to bring the Wahhabi militants "under control." Yet, it was Maskhadov's inability to keep Shamil Basayev and his followers in check that precipitated this conflict to begin with. Your indignation over Russia's handling of the war smacks of self-righteous hypocrisy. Where was your outrage when elderly women and their grandchildren wound up on the receiving end of U.S. cluster munitions in Yugoslavia?
WORLD
September 18, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
President Vladimir V. Putin and the most radical of Chechnya's separatist rebel leaders issued threats Friday that appeared to signal a deepening of their struggle. Chechen guerrilla leader Shamil Basayev issued a statement in which he took responsibility for recent terrorist attacks, coldly listed how much they cost, and tried to justify the most recent one -- a bloody school takeover in the southern Russian town of Beslan -- by comparing it to the U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the rows of banners unfurled by Chechen demonstrators each day at the site of Russian-Chechen peace talks, one of the most striking is a heroic portrait of guerrilla commander Shamil Basayev. "Imam Shamil II," it reads. "He who laughs last laughs best." There is nothing funny about this message. Basayev led the latest attack in the 6-month-old Chechen war--a siege of the Russian city of Budennovsk in which more than 1,000 civilians were held hostage for days and more than 100 people died.
WORLD
September 10, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
His face, with its bushy black beard and oddly placid eyes, is one of the most familiar in all of Russia. Nor has Shamil Basayev, the ruthless Chechen warlord whose operations are famed for their military precision and audacity, exactly gone out of his way to remain out of sight.
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the spate of recent terrorist bombings in Moscow and southern Russia, the nation learned a name already familiar, and frightening, to Americans: Osama bin Laden. After the apartment bombings that killed more than 300 Russians and terrified the nation this month, the Saudi millionaire's name was suddenly all over the Russian media, and the threat of international terrorism was on every politician's lips.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chechen separatist commander who led a raid on a southern Russian city said he executed five hostages Thursday in a besieged hospital and threatened to kill hundreds more unless the Russian government met his demands to end its war in Chechnya. The commander, Shamil Basayev, announced the executions at the end of a long day of negotiations opened by President Boris N.
NEWS
August 9, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia launched a powerful offensive Sunday against Muslim insurgents in its restive southern republic of Dagestan, trying to dislodge the rebels from four mountain villages and prevent the conflict from escalating to full-fledged warfare. Russian troops and police used helicopter gunships and howitzers to shell positions seized by more than 1,000 Muslim fighters a day earlier when they crossed into Dagestan from bases in the separatist republic of Chechnya.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a watermelon under his arm and a broad smile on his face, Shamil Basayev looks for a moment like a man at a picnic, not a warrior, a hostage-taker, a terrorist. But the video snippet that plays repeatedly on national television is deeply unsettling to Russian viewers.
WORLD
September 10, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
His face, with its bushy black beard and oddly placid eyes, is one of the most familiar in all of Russia. Nor has Shamil Basayev, the ruthless Chechen warlord whose operations are famed for their military precision and audacity, exactly gone out of his way to remain out of sight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999
Re "Misguided War on Chechnya," editorial, Oct. 7: Your criticism of Russian foreign policy is absurd. You suggest that the "sensible" thing for Moscow to do was to work with Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov to bring the Wahhabi militants "under control." Yet, it was Maskhadov's inability to keep Shamil Basayev and his followers in check that precipitated this conflict to begin with. Your indignation over Russia's handling of the war smacks of self-righteous hypocrisy. Where was your outrage when elderly women and their grandchildren wound up on the receiving end of U.S. cluster munitions in Yugoslavia?
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the spate of recent terrorist bombings in Moscow and southern Russia, the nation learned a name already familiar, and frightening, to Americans: Osama bin Laden. After the apartment bombings that killed more than 300 Russians and terrified the nation this month, the Saudi millionaire's name was suddenly all over the Russian media, and the threat of international terrorism was on every politician's lips.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a watermelon under his arm and a broad smile on his face, Shamil Basayev looks for a moment like a man at a picnic, not a warrior, a hostage-taker, a terrorist. But the video snippet that plays repeatedly on national television is deeply unsettling to Russian viewers.
NEWS
August 9, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia launched a powerful offensive Sunday against Muslim insurgents in its restive southern republic of Dagestan, trying to dislodge the rebels from four mountain villages and prevent the conflict from escalating to full-fledged warfare. Russian troops and police used helicopter gunships and howitzers to shell positions seized by more than 1,000 Muslim fighters a day earlier when they crossed into Dagestan from bases in the separatist republic of Chechnya.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the rows of banners unfurled by Chechen demonstrators each day at the site of Russian-Chechen peace talks, one of the most striking is a heroic portrait of guerrilla commander Shamil Basayev. "Imam Shamil II," it reads. "He who laughs last laughs best." There is nothing funny about this message. Basayev led the latest attack in the 6-month-old Chechen war--a siege of the Russian city of Budennovsk in which more than 1,000 civilians were held hostage for days and more than 100 people died.
WORLD
August 25, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Human rights activists expressed concern Thursday about a kidnapped Chechen journalist as information emerged that she was apparently married to a separatist leader killed in an explosion last month. Reporters Without Borders, a Paris-based group that campaigns for journalists' rights, said in a statement that Elina Ersenoyeva and her aunt had been abducted by gunmen on Aug. 17.
WORLD
September 18, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
President Vladimir V. Putin and the most radical of Chechnya's separatist rebel leaders issued threats Friday that appeared to signal a deepening of their struggle. Chechen guerrilla leader Shamil Basayev issued a statement in which he took responsibility for recent terrorist attacks, coldly listed how much they cost, and tried to justify the most recent one -- a bloody school takeover in the southern Russian town of Beslan -- by comparing it to the U.S.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shamil Basayev, the guerrilla commander holding hundreds of hostages in a hospital in southern Russia, inherited a long and proud ancestral tradition of suicidal resistance to invaders of his native Chechnya. Central to that tradition was the Basayev family's two-story stone house--built in the year 1010 and now reportedly destroyed by Russian bombs--in the mountain village of Vedeno. In its defense, one Basayev ancestor fought the 14th-Century Central Asian warlord Tamerlane.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chechen separatist commander who led a raid on a southern Russian city said he executed five hostages Thursday in a besieged hospital and threatened to kill hundreds more unless the Russian government met his demands to end its war in Chechnya. The commander, Shamil Basayev, announced the executions at the end of a long day of negotiations opened by President Boris N.
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