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Shampoo

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NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Ross Werland, Chicago Tribune travel editor
Lush New! is a  cinnamon and clove shampoo that's a solid and can be kept in a travel tin. I'm trying not to overstate the case, but I love this stuff. I don't know that I will ever use a liquid shampoo again. The first time I tried New! I followed the directions, wiping the moistened bar on my wet hair a few times. When I started working it into my hair, I was stunned at the huge amount of suds. More than that, I had one of the best hair days I've had in years. Now I have a good hair day every day. And because it's a solid, the shampoo is a natural for carrying instead of a liquid, which can create problems if you're going through security and have too much of it or if it leaks in your suitcase.
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NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, This post has been corrected, as indicated below:
Hairstylist Federic Fekkai's customers can get personal. “There are women who like to shock me by saying, 'Oh, I thought about you this morning … in my shower,'” he says. But he can laugh because he knows they are referring to his namesake shampoo and conditioner. “We want people to be responding emotionally," he adds. "The way I created this product is for it to be a great experience.” Make that an A-list experience. For more than 20 years, Fekkai -- in town last week to visit his West Coast flagship salon -- has worked on some of the world's most famous heads, names including Scarlett Johansson and Uma Thurman, Claudia Schiffer and Catherine Deneuve.
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IMAGE
October 31, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Lather, rinse, repeat. We all do it. Whether it's with a product that's foamy and fragrant or runny and medicinal, green and pearlescent or clear and perfume-free, Americans spend $1.4 billion on shampoo annually, according to SymphonyIRI Group, a Chicago-based market research firm. That's a lot of money spent on bubbles that work their magic in a matter of minutes and ultimately wash down the drain. Considering that all shampoos do the same thing (clean hair), there are enormous price disparities between products.
IMAGE
August 12, 2012 | By Kavita Daswani, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Summer can play havoc on the hair with prolonged exposure to the sun, seawater and chlorine as well as the inevitable perspiration and humidity that accompany the season. "It's important to always keep the hair hydrated; deep condition at least weekly," says Marco Pelusi, owner of the namesake West Hollywood salon. He recommends using a leave-in conditioner to lock in moisture and guard against color fading, both in the pool and while lounging in the sun. This summer, there's a profusion of new products designed to make hair care easy and effective.
HEALTH
December 6, 2010 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'd had a problem for months with a flaky, itchy eyelid and swelling near my eyelashes. It was miserable. My doctor prescribed an antibiotic ointment that helped but didn't cure it. Wiping with a baby-shampoo solution did little. Then I read that this condition ( blepharitis) is a form of dandruff. I immediately put a squirt of T/Gel (dandruff shampoo) in a bottle of water, wiped it on my eyelid and rinsed. I used it morning and evening for two days. After that, the problem was completely gone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1992
While I agree that single mothers need financial help, I am not in sympathy with some of the welfare mothers' complaints regarding the budget cuts. For example: Paper diapers, diaper wipes and shampoo are not essential items. I raised five children right here in Southern California and never used a paper diaper. Even without a washing machine, it is cheaper to go to a Laundromat once or twice a week than it is to buy paper diapers. A washcloth cleans a baby's behind just fine and is reusable.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, This post has been corrected, as indicated below:
Hairstylist Federic Fekkai's customers can get personal. “There are women who like to shock me by saying, 'Oh, I thought about you this morning … in my shower,'” he says. But he can laugh because he knows they are referring to his namesake shampoo and conditioner. “We want people to be responding emotionally," he adds. "The way I created this product is for it to be a great experience.” Make that an A-list experience. For more than 20 years, Fekkai -- in town last week to visit his West Coast flagship salon -- has worked on some of the world's most famous heads, names including Scarlett Johansson and Uma Thurman, Claudia Schiffer and Catherine Deneuve.
MAGAZINE
June 5, 1994
Samuel Greengard's consultation with a hair maven proves that he's suffering from only one malady: surplus discretionary income ("Brushing Up," Palm Latitudes, May 1). Examination of his hair follicle under a "Microviewer" is probably even less useful than scrutinizing a chicken's innards to get a glimpse of the future. Undoubtedly, if Greengard was required to pay a reputable dermatologist for the diagnosis and treatment of a real scalp problem, he would balk at the price and leave the office in a huff, declaring: "Bill my insurance."
TRAVEL
July 18, 2004
Regarding "Souvenirs, You Say? Hotels Might Call Them Stolen Goods" (Travel Insider, July 4): I have traveled extensively domestically and internationally. I am one of the 61% of people who have purchased -- not "nabbed" -- the toiletries in my hotel room. I am offended at the insinuation that taking what I have purchased is stealing. Please do not call me a thief for taking shampoo and soap worth $3 when I spend upward of $200 a night for a room. What do I do with the little bottles of shampoo?
OPINION
May 6, 2010 | Meghan Daum
Last summer, a reader sent me an e-mail with the subject heading "We get it! You own a home!" The body of the message was simply this: "How many times are you going to begin your column with 'as a homeowner?' Enough already!" She was right. But I didn't exactly apologize. Most columnists do occasionally resort to writing about their own lives (more than occasionally for some of us). In my case, that's meant writing about real estate, my own in particular. If you've ever bought a house, you probably know how quickly the responsibilities it carries can become the focus of your life.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Ross Werland, Chicago Tribune travel editor
Lush New! is a  cinnamon and clove shampoo that's a solid and can be kept in a travel tin. I'm trying not to overstate the case, but I love this stuff. I don't know that I will ever use a liquid shampoo again. The first time I tried New! I followed the directions, wiping the moistened bar on my wet hair a few times. When I started working it into my hair, I was stunned at the huge amount of suds. More than that, I had one of the best hair days I've had in years. Now I have a good hair day every day. And because it's a solid, the shampoo is a natural for carrying instead of a liquid, which can create problems if you're going through security and have too much of it or if it leaks in your suitcase.
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We're putting more gels, dyes, herbs and general gunk in our hair than ever before. But, in fact, there's something beautiful about simplicity. "People say they have bad hair, and they need to do a lot to it," says Dr. Zoe Draelos, a consulting professor of dermatology at Duke University and a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. "The opposite is true. The less you handle your hair, the better. " Let's take a look at the basics. Each hair is a strand of dead cells coated in natural oils and the dirt that you pick up throughout the day. Remember: We're talking about one of your better features here.
IMAGE
April 22, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Lather, rinse, repeat. We all do it — usually with a liquid shampoo. But a handful of manufacturers are getting rid of the plastic bottles and the liquid and offering shampoos in solid bars that look like traditional hand soap. Canadian cosmetic company Lush makes nine formulas of solid shampoos, as well as a solid conditioner. J.R. Liggett's, in New Hampshire, makes six. And countless artisan soap makers also are capitalizing on growing customer demand for a concentrated product that has all the performance of a regular shampoo but with less packaging and fewer chemicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2012 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Director Jason Reitman is promising some colorful stage directions when he and a group of actors perform a live, onstage reading of "Shampoo," the 1975 film that starred Warren Beatty as a promiscuous Beverly Hills hairdresser, on Thursday. "That will be the funny part. I will be reading all the sex scenes," Reitman laughs. "So I will be announcing every thrust. " Reitman's "Live Read" program has had instant sellouts since the series began last October as part of the new Film Independent program of classic and contemporary film at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Once a month, Reitman presents a cinema favorite with a different cast of actors cold-reading the famous scripts.
HEALTH
December 6, 2010 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'd had a problem for months with a flaky, itchy eyelid and swelling near my eyelashes. It was miserable. My doctor prescribed an antibiotic ointment that helped but didn't cure it. Wiping with a baby-shampoo solution did little. Then I read that this condition ( blepharitis) is a form of dandruff. I immediately put a squirt of T/Gel (dandruff shampoo) in a bottle of water, wiped it on my eyelid and rinsed. I used it morning and evening for two days. After that, the problem was completely gone.
IMAGE
October 31, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Lather, rinse, repeat. We all do it. Whether it's with a product that's foamy and fragrant or runny and medicinal, green and pearlescent or clear and perfume-free, Americans spend $1.4 billion on shampoo annually, according to SymphonyIRI Group, a Chicago-based market research firm. That's a lot of money spent on bubbles that work their magic in a matter of minutes and ultimately wash down the drain. Considering that all shampoos do the same thing (clean hair), there are enormous price disparities between products.
NEWS
December 28, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
The adventures of George, a motorized Beverly Hills hairdresser (consciously based on the hero of Wycherley's "The Country Wife") with a hectic sex life and a hair-blower at his belt, on Election Eve, 1968. This 1975 hit stars and, with Robert Towne, was written by Warren Beatty (pictured). Julie Christie (pictured), Goldie Hawn, Lee Grant (who won a best supporting actress Oscar) and Carrie Fisher (in her film debut) are the women in his life. Directed by Hal Ashby (Cinemax Sunday at 8 p.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Carina Chocano
"Shampoo," made in 1975 but set in 1968, the night before Richard Nixon's election to the presidency, was directed by Hal Ashby and written by Robert Towne and Warren Beatty, who may have produced one of the best scripts in the last three decades.
OPINION
May 6, 2010 | Meghan Daum
Last summer, a reader sent me an e-mail with the subject heading "We get it! You own a home!" The body of the message was simply this: "How many times are you going to begin your column with 'as a homeowner?' Enough already!" She was right. But I didn't exactly apologize. Most columnists do occasionally resort to writing about their own lives (more than occasionally for some of us). In my case, that's meant writing about real estate, my own in particular. If you've ever bought a house, you probably know how quickly the responsibilities it carries can become the focus of your life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | Glenn Whipp
Ashton Kutcher's suspenders-wearing stud in "Spread" arrives in Los Angeles dreaming of the good life, which, for Kutcher's Nikki, revolves around Amazon women, beaches, Amazon women on beaches and designer underwear. "Damn you, Van Halen!" Nikki bitterly laments in what passes for character revelation late in the film. Nikki, you see, thought life here really mirrored the images in music videos that he would have been too young to have watched in the first place. Nikki realizes -- too late, of course -- that, in the immortal words once sung by David Lee Roth, he's just a gigolo and life goes on without him. If only "Spread" were half as entertaining as a Van Halen video.
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