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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
David W. Kenney, SeaWorld's first veterinarian, who played a key role in bringing the original Shamu to the San Diego amusement park as well as a gray whale believed to be the first raised by humans, died Feb. 14 in Montrose, Colo. He was 77. The cause was cancer, said his sister, Meredith Maler. Kenney was hired by the park a few weeks before its 1964 opening and over the next several years displayed an ingenuity and dedication that helped the fledgling tourist attraction build and maintain an impressive collection of marine animals.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
U.S. Olympic Committee Chief Executive Scott Blackmun said Friday that he is talking to 10 cities about a possible bid for the 2024 Summer Games and mentioned an intriguing pairing: A joint proposal from San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. “We're in discussion with about 10 cities actively now,” Blackmun said. “The process is really working the way it was supposed to.” When asked specifically about the San Diego/Tijuana bid, Blackmun said, “That would have its challenges.
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OPINION
September 26, 2008
Re "Palin makes her debut on the international stage," Sept. 24 Sarah Palin's photo-op with so many world leaders is truly an inspiration. I think I'll make a trip to SeaWorld and arrange for a picture with Shamu. I've always wanted to be a wild-animal trainer. Nancy A. Cox Palm Desert
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
David W. Kenney, SeaWorld's first veterinarian, who played a key role in bringing the original Shamu to the San Diego amusement park as well as a gray whale believed to be the first raised by humans, died Feb. 14 in Montrose, Colo. He was 77. The cause was cancer, said his sister, Meredith Maler. Kenney was hired by the park a few weeks before its 1964 opening and over the next several years displayed an ingenuity and dedication that helped the fledgling tourist attraction build and maintain an impressive collection of marine animals.
NEWS
March 1, 1987
Corky and Orky, the killer-whale couple that for two decades delighted crowds at Marineland, have been stripped of their "hokey" names by their new owners at Sea World in San Diego. Corky, a 10,000-pound female, has been renamed Namu, and Orky, her 14,000-pound former mate, now answers to Shamu. "I thought they were kind of hokey names," said Lanny Cornell, zoological director of Sea World, where the animals now live along with many other former Marineland inhabitants.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
U.S. Olympic Committee Chief Executive Scott Blackmun said Friday that he is talking to 10 cities about a possible bid for the 2024 Summer Games and mentioned an intriguing pairing: A joint proposal from San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. “We're in discussion with about 10 cities actively now,” Blackmun said. “The process is really working the way it was supposed to.” When asked specifically about the San Diego/Tijuana bid, Blackmun said, “That would have its challenges.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A child's favorite question may be "why?" But parents frequently don't know all the answers. CBS' new series How'd They Do That? may be coming to the rescue. Segments include the answer to "How do Tom and Sue Swick manage to lead a normal life when they have nine children under the age of 11?" In addition to providing a unique portrait of time management, this is a segment that could help parents appreciate smaller broods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Sea World of San Diego, whose five-year permit to capture Alaskan killer whales was declared invalid last week by a federal judge, will likely either appeal the judge's decision, file for a new permit or seek to import whales captured outside of U.S. territorial waters. That was the assessment offered Tuesday by David M.
NEWS
July 4, 2002 | ROBERT NILES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SeaWorld shows traditionally feature killer whales, dolphins and other marine animals you wouldn't normally find roaming your neighborhood. But the San Diego park's new "Pets Rule!" show turns the spotlight on dogs, cats and other domesticated animals. "Pets Rule!" eschews SeaWorld's massive water tanks for a sun-drenched outdoor set made up to look like a giant backyard. It's an appropriate setting for this affectionate tribute. But don't forget to pack the sunscreen.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Anheuser-Busch has agreed to spend $1.1 billion to buy the Sea World parks from Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, but it may have to share the marketing rights to the parks' symbol, Shamu the killer whale. Orlando-based HBJ already has a licensing agreement with Watson General Pictures of La Jolla, which created the cartoon "Shamu--The Beginning," which has not yet appeared on television. Any proceeds from the animated special or merchandising spinoffs will be shared among Anheuser-Busch of St.
NEWS
May 29, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
For the first time in more than four decades, a new Shamu show premiered Saturday at SeaWorld San Diego without animal trainers performing stunts in the water with the marine park's iconic killer whales. Photos : "One Ocean" killer whale show at Sea World San Diego After a fatal accident at SeaWorld's sister park in Florida, the San Diego park unveiled the conservation-themed " One Ocean " show, featuring orcas performing in unison against a new backdrop of giant LCD screens surrounding a tie-dye-colored whale fluke.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
SeaWorld San Diego is set to launch a new killer whale show May 27 following the death last year of an animal trainer in Orlando, Fla., that forced a complete reworking of the marine park's signature Shamu attraction. Photos : 'One Ocean' killer whale show at Sea World San Diego The conservation-themed " One Ocean " show will feature dancing fountains, underwater imagery and orcas performing in unison against a new backdrop of giant LCD screens surrounding a tie-dye colored whale fluke.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
SeaWorld trainers won't return to "water work" with killer whales in the new 2011 Shamu show after the death of an animal trainer forced a complete reworking of the marine park's signature attraction, SeaWorld officials said. " One Ocean " will replace the 5-year-old " Believe " killer-whale show at SeaWorld parks in Orlando, Fla. (in April), San Diego (on Memorial Day weekend) and San Antonio (in June). SeaWorld pulled all trainers out of its orca pools after the February 2010, death of Dawn Brancheau , a SeaWorld Orlando trainer who was killed by a 6-ton orca named Tilikum.
NEWS
December 9, 2010 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
SeaWorld marine parks will launch a new killer-whale show in spring 2011 as it attempts to move beyond the death of an animal trainer that forced a complete reworking of the current Shamu show. The as-yet-unnamed Shamu show , according to the Orlando Sentinel, will replace the 5-year-old " Believe " as the signature attraction at SeaWorld parks in San Diego ; Orlando, Fla.; and San Antonio. Thematic details of the new show are expected to be unveiled in the coming weeks.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2010 | By Anika Myers Palm and Eloísa Ruano González
Hundreds of patrons packed into Shamu Stadium on Saturday for the return of SeaWorld Orlando's "Believe" show, three days after a killer whale dragged a veteran animal trainer underwater to her death. Despite a morning drizzle, visitors stood in line for two hours beginning at 9 a.m. to see the first performance. The show featured a tribute to Dawn Brancheau, who drowned Wednesday after the orca Tilikum yanked her by her ponytail and pulled her underwater. Billy Grady and his family, tourists from Georgia, returned to the park to see the show after it was canceled Friday.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2010 | By Jason Garcia and Walter Pacheco
SeaWorld Orlando and its sister parks in San Diego and San Antonio will resume performances of their killer whale shows Saturday, although trainers will be forbidden from swimming with the animals while the company investigates what led to this week's fatal attack by one of its orcas. Tilikum, the 6-ton killer whale that pulled a veteran trainer underwater to her death Wednesday, will not perform Saturday. The company had suspended its popular show in Shamu Stadium after the death of trainer Dawn Brancheau.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1987 | EILEEN SONDAK
Move over, Shamu. You and the other aquatic stars at Sea World will have to share the spotlight with some toe-shoed landlubbers from the California Ballet this weekend. To celebrate the start of its 20th anniversary season, the San Diego-based troupe will dance "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at Sea World's Nautilus Bowl. The full-length ballet, featuring a cast that rivals "The Nutcracker" in size, will run at 8 p.m. Saturday and at 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
December 9, 2010 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
SeaWorld marine parks will launch a new killer-whale show in spring 2011 as it attempts to move beyond the death of an animal trainer that forced a complete reworking of the current Shamu show. The as-yet-unnamed Shamu show , according to the Orlando Sentinel, will replace the 5-year-old " Believe " as the signature attraction at SeaWorld parks in San Diego ; Orlando, Fla.; and San Antonio. Thematic details of the new show are expected to be unveiled in the coming weeks.
OPINION
September 26, 2008
Re "Palin makes her debut on the international stage," Sept. 24 Sarah Palin's photo-op with so many world leaders is truly an inspiration. I think I'll make a trip to SeaWorld and arrange for a picture with Shamu. I've always wanted to be a wild-animal trainer. Nancy A. Cox Palm Desert
OPINION
July 3, 2006 | Eric Lucas, ERIC LUCAS lives in Seattle. He is a travel and natural history writer.
THE ORCAS OF Puget Sound are the victims of a painful irony: The more popular they become, the more miserable their lives are. What torments these 90 or so creatures are whale-watching boats -- a buzzing, fulminating flotilla crowded with tourists who want to get as close as possible to killer whales. How close? The boat operators have a voluntary code that is supposed to keep them 100 yards from the massive animals. Scaled down to human terms, that guideline translates to 20 yards.
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