Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShane Carruth
IN THE NEWS

Shane Carruth

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Shane Carruth has been one of the independent film world's most interesting enigmas. After bursting on the scene with the time-travel head-spinner “Primer” in 2004, he disappeared for nine years, barely a word uttered about him save for the occasional whisper of a long-simmering sci-fi film called “A Topiary.” At Sundance this year he finally surfaced --  but with a different film. “Upstream Color,” starring Carruth himself (he also served as actor, editor, cinematographer and in numerous other capacities)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
This year's Oscar best picture race continues to be defined as a clash between fall festival favorites "12 Years a Slave" and "Gravity. " "Gravity" has made headlines in recent weeks for its eye-popping box-office numbers with receipts now exceeding $575 million worldwide. But on Tuesday, it will be "12 Years'" turn to stand in the spotlight when Film Independent announces its list of nominations for its annual Spirit Awards. It's a safe bet that the acclaimed historical drama will steamroll through the Spirits, securing nominations for film, director Steve McQueen, actors Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender and Lupita Nyong'o and writer John Ridley.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Upstream Color" is as enigmatic as filmmaking gets - not in a casual way, but determinedly, even willfully. Being completely understood at first glance is not on creator Shane Carruth's agenda, but while this may sound upsetting, it turns out to be quite the opposite. Carruth, whose cult favorite "Primer" won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in 2004, is unwavering about telling his stories his own particular way, and he's so good at it that he pins us to our seats even when we're not exactly sure what's going on. Maybe because we're not exactly sure what's going on. For to watch the haunting, disturbing "Upstream Color" is to feel like you're inside not one of your own dreams but someone else's, a dream that's both compelling and unnerving in ways you can't put your finger on. Part science fiction scare movie, part offbeat romance, part completely unclassifiable, "Color" is also one-man filmmaking of a remarkable sort.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Apparently winning two of the biggest prizes at the Sundance Film Festival does not make a film immune from further tinkering, as it was announced Wednesday that "Fruitvale" will be changing its title to "Fruitvale Station. " The film won both the U.S. dramatic grand jury and audience prizes when it premiered at Sundance in January and will be released by the Weinstein Co. on July 26. The feature debut for writer-director Ryan Coogler, the film tells the fact-based story of the life and death of Oscar Grant, an unarmed 22-year-old who was fatally shot by authorities at the Fruitvale train station in Oakland on New Year's Day 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Winner of the Sundance Grand Jury Prize, Shane Carruth's "Primer" is one of those movies that's legendary on impact thanks to its felicitous combination of ingenuity, independence and dirt-cheapness. First-time writer-director Carruth himself has described the movie's budget as the rough equivalent of "the price of a used car," a phrase that will resonate with anyone who's ever perused the how-to-make-an-indie-film section at their local Barnes & Noble. Everybody loves a bargain.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Apparently winning two of the biggest prizes at the Sundance Film Festival does not make a film immune from further tinkering, as it was announced Wednesday that "Fruitvale" will be changing its title to "Fruitvale Station. " The film won both the U.S. dramatic grand jury and audience prizes when it premiered at Sundance in January and will be released by the Weinstein Co. on July 26. The feature debut for writer-director Ryan Coogler, the film tells the fact-based story of the life and death of Oscar Grant, an unarmed 22-year-old who was fatally shot by authorities at the Fruitvale train station in Oakland on New Year's Day 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
This year's Oscar best picture race continues to be defined as a clash between fall festival favorites "12 Years a Slave" and "Gravity. " "Gravity" has made headlines in recent weeks for its eye-popping box-office numbers with receipts now exceeding $575 million worldwide. But on Tuesday, it will be "12 Years'" turn to stand in the spotlight when Film Independent announces its list of nominations for its annual Spirit Awards. It's a safe bet that the acclaimed historical drama will steamroll through the Spirits, securing nominations for film, director Steve McQueen, actors Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender and Lupita Nyong'o and writer John Ridley.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
One of the great past Sundance success stories was "Primer," a mind-bending science-fiction time travel thriller made on a shoestring budget of $7,000 by former engineer Shane Carruth. The film took the top prize at Sundance in 2004 and was nominated for four Independent Spirit Awards the next year after its theatrical release. Despite many rave reviews and a steadily growing cult audience, Carruth's long-awaited follow-up feature "Upstream Color" has finally materialized and will debut at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Nine years ago, Shane Carruth burst onto the independent film scene with "Primer," a heady, complex, sci-fi thriller that made time travel seem disturbingly plausible. Shot for only $7,000, the film took the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, beating out more buzzworthy titles like "Napoleon Dynamite" and "Garden State. " Carruth - a one-time software engineer - served as director, writer, producer, actor, cinematographer, editor, composer, casting director, production designer and sound designer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2004 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Roughly one-third of the way through Shane Carruth's cerebral sci-fi drama "Primer," two amateur scientists invent a mysterious technology that will allow them to elliptically curve the time-space continuum -- in effect, to travel through time. Voice-over narration addresses the difficulties the twentysomething protagonists Abe and Aaron face: "Their enthusiasm became a slow realization that they were out of their depth."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Upstream Color" is as enigmatic as filmmaking gets - not in a casual way, but determinedly, even willfully. Being completely understood at first glance is not on creator Shane Carruth's agenda, but while this may sound upsetting, it turns out to be quite the opposite. Carruth, whose cult favorite "Primer" won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in 2004, is unwavering about telling his stories his own particular way, and he's so good at it that he pins us to our seats even when we're not exactly sure what's going on. Maybe because we're not exactly sure what's going on. For to watch the haunting, disturbing "Upstream Color" is to feel like you're inside not one of your own dreams but someone else's, a dream that's both compelling and unnerving in ways you can't put your finger on. Part science fiction scare movie, part offbeat romance, part completely unclassifiable, "Color" is also one-man filmmaking of a remarkable sort.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Shane Carruth has been one of the independent film world's most interesting enigmas. After bursting on the scene with the time-travel head-spinner “Primer” in 2004, he disappeared for nine years, barely a word uttered about him save for the occasional whisper of a long-simmering sci-fi film called “A Topiary.” At Sundance this year he finally surfaced --  but with a different film. “Upstream Color,” starring Carruth himself (he also served as actor, editor, cinematographer and in numerous other capacities)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Nine years ago, Shane Carruth burst onto the independent film scene with "Primer," a heady, complex, sci-fi thriller that made time travel seem disturbingly plausible. Shot for only $7,000, the film took the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, beating out more buzzworthy titles like "Napoleon Dynamite" and "Garden State. " Carruth - a one-time software engineer - served as director, writer, producer, actor, cinematographer, editor, composer, casting director, production designer and sound designer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
One of the great past Sundance success stories was "Primer," a mind-bending science-fiction time travel thriller made on a shoestring budget of $7,000 by former engineer Shane Carruth. The film took the top prize at Sundance in 2004 and was nominated for four Independent Spirit Awards the next year after its theatrical release. Despite many rave reviews and a steadily growing cult audience, Carruth's long-awaited follow-up feature "Upstream Color" has finally materialized and will debut at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2004 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Roughly one-third of the way through Shane Carruth's cerebral sci-fi drama "Primer," two amateur scientists invent a mysterious technology that will allow them to elliptically curve the time-space continuum -- in effect, to travel through time. Voice-over narration addresses the difficulties the twentysomething protagonists Abe and Aaron face: "Their enthusiasm became a slow realization that they were out of their depth."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Winner of the Sundance Grand Jury Prize, Shane Carruth's "Primer" is one of those movies that's legendary on impact thanks to its felicitous combination of ingenuity, independence and dirt-cheapness. First-time writer-director Carruth himself has described the movie's budget as the rough equivalent of "the price of a used car," a phrase that will resonate with anyone who's ever perused the how-to-make-an-indie-film section at their local Barnes & Noble. Everybody loves a bargain.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
A nostalgic look at the beginning of the independent film movement, a biography of a controversial sex educator, a drama about a young Colombian woman working as a mule for drug dealers, a complex thriller made for pocket change and a comedy-drama set in the California wine country garnered best feature nominations for the 20th IFP Independent Spirit Awards. The best feature nominations, announced Tuesday, for "Baadasssss!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Susan King
Steve McQueen's "12 Years a Slave," the acclaimed, unflinching look at the brutality of slavery in America, earned the most nominations Tuesday for the 29th Film Independent Spirit Awards. The film received seven nominations including, best picture, best director, lead actor for Chiwetel Ejifor, supporting actor for Michael Fassbender and supporting actress for Lupita Nyong'o. Alexander Payne's "Nebraska" received six nominations, including best film, best director, lead actor for Bruce Dern, supporting actor for Will Forte and suppporting actress for June Squibb.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|