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Shane Mccabe

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1989 | LYNN HEFFLEY
I n a pool of dim light on a small stage, a stout, middle-aged man, his balding head crowned with a monkish fringe, kneels on a tiny wooden platform. His round face breaks into a grin; he speaks, incongruously, in the lisping tones of a child: "My daddy can't hit me today; he got a finger cut off at work." Audience laughter, sharply expelled, momentarily breaks the tense silence at the Santa Monica Playhouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1989 | LYNN HEFFLEY
I n a pool of dim light on a small stage, a stout, middle-aged man, his balding head crowned with a monkish fringe, kneels on a tiny wooden platform. His round face breaks into a grin; he speaks, incongruously, in the lisping tones of a child: "My daddy can't hit me today; he got a finger cut off at work." Audience laughter, sharply expelled, momentarily breaks the tense silence at the Santa Monica Playhouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Three months ago, 47-year-old Shane McCabe did a monologue for an acting class that knocked the socks off Mark W. Travis, his teacher. "It was about a young boy who was taken away from home and left in a motel for the entire summer," Travis said. "There was money allocated for food, but he was basically abandoned. At the end of the summer, his mother came and took him back home. And Shane said, 'I didn't understand till much later that she was trying to save my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Three months ago, 47-year-old Shane McCabe did a monologue for an acting class that knocked the socks off Mark W. Travis, his teacher. "It was about a young boy who was taken away from home and left in a motel for the entire summer," Travis said. "There was money allocated for food, but he was basically abandoned. At the end of the summer, his mother came and took him back home. And Shane said, 'I didn't understand till much later that she was trying to save my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Shane McCabe looks as if he could play Santa Claus. He's the right size and shape, and he has a reservoir of sympathy for children. All he needs is the white beard, to cover up the hurt and anxiety that fill his face. The hurt caused the anxiety--McCabe was a victim of severe child abuse. Now, at 48, he has decided to tell the world about it, in a monologue at the Tiffany Theatre, "No Place Like Home."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1989 | RAY LOYND
Shane McCabe, chubby and a bit rumpled, materializes on stage with the visage of an anxious cherub. It is an apt image but it is no act. McCabe was an abused child, and for nearly two hours in his devastating solo flight, "No Place Like Home" at the Santa Monica Playhouse, he re-creates his childhood holocaust. Broken ribs, welts, smashed teeth and cigarette burns seem the least of the damage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
There aren't many theater openings at Christmas time. So we're devoting this week's column to a glimpse of scheduled theater events in 1989. The Mark Taper Forum starts off with Jon Robin Baitz's "Dutch Landscape," directed by Gordon Davidson opening Jan. 19.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV
Dayton Callie can't exactly call theater his first love. "I've had around 60 jobs," said the actor-playwright, whose relationship comedy "Survival of the Heart" premieres tonight at Theatre West in Studio City, kicking off the theater's 30th season. "I've been a bartender and waiter, worked in a mothball factory, sold cigarettes, polished ashtrays, worked at a racetrack, drove trucks, sold macaroni, been a rug shampooer, a candy distributor and worked on a bread truck.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
It's the week to be wishy-washy in the ongoing Waiver Wars. Actors' Equity's 99-Seat Theater Plan went into effect Monday, ending Equity Waiver as it had been practiced for 16 years. But many of the producers of upcoming shows in smaller theaters still haven't decided what to do about it. "Wait and see" is the most common response to the question of whether producers will sign with the Equity plan or with the rival plan offered since Sept. 12 by the Associated Theatres of Los Angeles (ATLAS).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
"Spring Awakening" isn't the only show in town that has already begun as we file into the theater. Climb up a set of stairs adjacent to a Melrose diner, saunter down a long hallway to the Ossetynski Actor's Lab, and you'll find writer/performer David W. W. Johnstone already seated in an old living room sofa chair, humming, fixed on a distant idea.
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