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July 4, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shang--his full name--is the kind of comedian who wears rectangular sunglasses and a grinning skull and crossbones on his hat, and who informs his audience that he just bought a gun--to kill the New Kids on the Block. "I played the New Kids backward the other day and heard the Osmonds. I hate them," he says. "If it was up to me, it would be Dead Kids on a Rock."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The Great Wall of Lucy Wu A Novel Wendy Wan-Long Shang Scholastic Press: 312 pp., $17.99 Eleven-year-olds aren't known for being accommodating. As a whole, this subspecies known as "tween" is self-interested and self-conscious, a deadly combination that shuns anything that prompts embarrassment, such as a wrinkled old lady with Brillo pad hair who can't communicate in English and looks as foreign as she is. In the humorous new middle-grade novel "The Great Wall of Lucy Wu," an 11-year-old girl is challenged to overcome her innate tween dismissiveness and balance the two forces that define her. A second-generation Chinese American, Lucy Wu has relegated China to "the hyphenated place in my life" between the two cultures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The Great Wall of Lucy Wu A Novel Wendy Wan-Long Shang Scholastic Press: 312 pp., $17.99 Eleven-year-olds aren't known for being accommodating. As a whole, this subspecies known as "tween" is self-interested and self-conscious, a deadly combination that shuns anything that prompts embarrassment, such as a wrinkled old lady with Brillo pad hair who can't communicate in English and looks as foreign as she is. In the humorous new middle-grade novel "The Great Wall of Lucy Wu," an 11-year-old girl is challenged to overcome her innate tween dismissiveness and balance the two forces that define her. A second-generation Chinese American, Lucy Wu has relegated China to "the hyphenated place in my life" between the two cultures.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"For Colored Girls" is not easy. Its poetry is hot and searing, its story an unbroken current of rage and pain and sex and abuse and solidarity and self and empowerment. Nine women ? in screams, whispers and weeping ? demand that you listen, that you don't look away, that you deal with the discomfort as they did. It is a film destined to polarize. Many will hate it. Hopefully more will love it, or at least allow room for it, for its raw brutality, its extremes, its difficult truths.
BOOKS
December 18, 1994 | Kelly Cherry, Kelly Cherry is a poet, fiction writer and essayist whose books include "My Life and Dr. Joyce Brothers," a novel in stories
Ntozake Shange, a multitalented writer best known for her play, "for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf," and the novel, "Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo," in her third novel offers a daring portrait of a black woman artist re-creating herself out of social and psychological chaos, the fragmentation that haunts our time, our nation. Ourselves. Liliane is undergoing a traditional psychoanalysis.
BOOKS
July 19, 1987 | Jack Miles
If a text may be illustrated, may a painting be texted? Two recent books by noted artists answer that question in the affirmative but in sharply different ways. But again, if a painting is to be texted, what kind of text should it be? Is this painting (a writer may ask) the visual equivalent of a lyric poem? Or is it an editorial or a short story or a travelogue? Ann Beattie calls her book on 26 paintings by Alex Katz a "reading" of his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedian Jett Matthews has a fairly good sense of who he is. "I'm pretty much a pessimistic optimist," Matthews says. "I think there will probably be a nuclear war, but not before Super Bowl Sunday." And, hopefully, not before the comedy show tonight at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, where Matthews will appear on a bill with comedians Jimmy McGee, Dick Hardwick and Shang. The four run the gamut of the comedy spectrum.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | DANA THOMAS, WASHINGTON POST
On the world's highest plain, in the outer reaches of Tibet, French explorer Michel Peissel was tracing ancient trading routes when he stumbled upon a cluster of curious-looking dome-shaped structures made of mud and brick. Though they were unusual, Peissel, an ethnologist and anthropologist, didn't think much of the igloo-looking huts at first, dismissing them as many have before him as chortens, a type of Buddhist monument.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles theater producer Gary Levingston calls "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf" one of the most transcendent works of the American stage. Ntozake Shange's 1970s play about the struggles of several black women is "life-changing and life-saving," said Levingston, who has brought two stagings of the play to life in the last two years. Although Levingston has nothing but praise for Shange, he is notably more reserved about Tyler Perry, Hollywood's most commercially successful and controversial independent black filmmaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"For Colored Girls" is not easy. Its poetry is hot and searing, its story an unbroken current of rage and pain and sex and abuse and solidarity and self and empowerment. Nine women ? in screams, whispers and weeping ? demand that you listen, that you don't look away, that you deal with the discomfort as they did. It is a film destined to polarize. Many will hate it. Hopefully more will love it, or at least allow room for it, for its raw brutality, its extremes, its difficult truths.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles theater producer Gary Levingston calls "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf" one of the most transcendent works of the American stage. Ntozake Shange's 1970s play about the struggles of several black women is "life-changing and life-saving," said Levingston, who has brought two stagings of the play to life in the last two years. Although Levingston has nothing but praise for Shange, he is notably more reserved about Tyler Perry, Hollywood's most commercially successful and controversial independent black filmmaker.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | DANA THOMAS, WASHINGTON POST
On the world's highest plain, in the outer reaches of Tibet, French explorer Michel Peissel was tracing ancient trading routes when he stumbled upon a cluster of curious-looking dome-shaped structures made of mud and brick. Though they were unusual, Peissel, an ethnologist and anthropologist, didn't think much of the igloo-looking huts at first, dismissing them as many have before him as chortens, a type of Buddhist monument.
BOOKS
December 18, 1994 | Kelly Cherry, Kelly Cherry is a poet, fiction writer and essayist whose books include "My Life and Dr. Joyce Brothers," a novel in stories
Ntozake Shange, a multitalented writer best known for her play, "for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf," and the novel, "Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo," in her third novel offers a daring portrait of a black woman artist re-creating herself out of social and psychological chaos, the fragmentation that haunts our time, our nation. Ourselves. Liliane is undergoing a traditional psychoanalysis.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shang--his full name--is the kind of comedian who wears rectangular sunglasses and a grinning skull and crossbones on his hat, and who informs his audience that he just bought a gun--to kill the New Kids on the Block. "I played the New Kids backward the other day and heard the Osmonds. I hate them," he says. "If it was up to me, it would be Dead Kids on a Rock."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedian Jett Matthews has a fairly good sense of who he is. "I'm pretty much a pessimistic optimist," Matthews says. "I think there will probably be a nuclear war, but not before Super Bowl Sunday." And, hopefully, not before the comedy show tonight at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, where Matthews will appear on a bill with comedians Jimmy McGee, Dick Hardwick and Shang. The four run the gamut of the comedy spectrum.
BOOKS
July 19, 1987 | Jack Miles
If a text may be illustrated, may a painting be texted? Two recent books by noted artists answer that question in the affirmative but in sharply different ways. But again, if a painting is to be texted, what kind of text should it be? Is this painting (a writer may ask) the visual equivalent of a lyric poem? Or is it an editorial or a short story or a travelogue? Ann Beattie calls her book on 26 paintings by Alex Katz a "reading" of his work.
NEWS
December 15, 1985 | Associated Press
Aeronautical researchers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base have found that they can use computer models to test aircraft designs at about one-tenth the cost of using wind tunnels. Since the days of the Wright brothers, researchers have used wind tunnels to test airframe designs by subjecting scale models to airflow examinations. Now, a research group led by Joseph J. S.
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