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Shanghai Aviation Industrial Corp

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BUSINESS
October 15, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas said Monday that the company had moved ahead of Boeing in a competition to supply China with passenger jetliners, which would be assembled in Shanghai with parts supplied by McDonnell's U.S. operations. The company cited Chinese press reports that officials at the Shanghai Aviation Industrial Corp. said they were in "final negotiations" with McDonnell on a deal to build 170 of its MD-90 jets, which is known in China as the "trunkliner" program.
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NEWS
June 29, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas scored an important victory Sunday when it concluded longstanding negotiations to sell 40 commercial jetliners to China for more than $1 billion, a deal that fortifies one of its key links in Asia. The order from China is for 20 MD-80s and 20 MD-90s, both medium-sized, two engine aircraft that will be assembled in Shanghai with kits shipped from the firm's plants in Long Beach and other U.S. locations.
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NEWS
June 29, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas scored an important victory Sunday when it concluded longstanding negotiations to sell 40 commercial jetliners to China for more than $1 billion, a deal that fortifies one of its key links in Asia. The order from China is for 20 MD-80s and 20 MD-90s, both medium-sized, two engine aircraft that will be assembled in Shanghai with kits shipped from the firm's plants in Long Beach and other U.S. locations.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas said Monday that the company had moved ahead of Boeing in a competition to supply China with passenger jetliners, which would be assembled in Shanghai with parts supplied by McDonnell's U.S. operations. The company cited Chinese press reports that officials at the Shanghai Aviation Industrial Corp. said they were in "final negotiations" with McDonnell on a deal to build 170 of its MD-90 jets, which is known in China as the "trunkliner" program.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1985 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Culminating six years of negotiations, McDonnell Douglas said Friday that it had reached a final agreement for China to buy and co-produce 26 MD-80 jetliners--the first time, it said, that a foreign country will provide the final assembly of a U.S. jetliner. The deal announced Friday involved one more plane than had been specified in January when the St. Louis-based company had said that it had reached a tentative agreement for China to co-produce 25 of the aircraft.
NEWS
March 6, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, nearing the end of his five-day trip to China, said Thursday that he could not vouch for the accuracy of official Chinese assertions that the country's economic reform program will continue despite its political turmoil. "They (Chinese leaders) said they intend to remain on their current course of openness to the outside and reform inside, and they have said that is what makes sense because it has worked," Shultz said.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government is preparing to choose a U.S. partner for a 150-aircraft co-production venture that would upgrade the Chinese aerospace industry and perhaps make it a major supplier of components for American jetliners. Waging battle for the deal, estimated to be worth at least $4.5 billion over 10 to 15 years, are Boeing Co., currently the largest supplier of aircraft to China, and McDonnell Douglas Corp., already involved in a co-production venture in Shanghai.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA and GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writers
James Spear, his wife Liang and their two children took off from Ontario International Airport at 9 a.m. Monday, bound for Beijing. Spear was returning to his job as manager of an international subsidiary of Unison Group, a San Bruno, Calif., company that advises foreign firms about doing business in China. "He felt the Japanese hadn't pulled out many of their businessmen," said his father, James Spear Sr. "He felt for the long term he should be there." The decision has his parents, who live in Covina, worried.
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