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NEWS
April 16, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The doorman at a rundown factory on the outskirts of Shanghai looks like a migrant worker from the countryside. But Chen Zhenlong was born and raised here in China's most affluent and elegant city. What wore him down was nearly 30 years as a farmer, horse herder and coal miner in Heilongjiang, in the country's northeastern corner near the Russian border. Liu Xiaolong too is a Shanghai native who was away too long to belong now.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
As Walt Disney Co. prepares to break ground on its first theme park in mainland China, the significance for the company reaches well beyond the opportunity to sell legions of Mickey Mouse-ear hats. Although much smaller than Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla., the Shanghai park holds outsize importance for the company, because it would provide entree to a market of 1.3 billion people, 30 million of whom enter the middle class each year. When it opens in five years, the $3.7-billion tourist attraction would serve as a launching pad for Disney's broader ambitions in the region.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1949, when photojournalist Sam Tata watched Communist troops take over his home town of Shanghai, China, recording the events was evidently more important to him than any recognition he might later receive. "At that time, I wasn't presumptuous enough to say, 'Well, here I am, witnessing history,' " said Tata recently. "I was in my city of birth, I had a camera, and I just never left the house without it. That's what I did. I just photographed."
WORLD
November 15, 2009 | By Peter Nicholas
President Obama told Chinese students today that the U.S. does not wish to contain China's rise, but also offered a gentle critique of their country's approach to human rights. "We welcome China as a strong and prosperous and successful member of the community of nations," Obama said at the start of a town hall-style meeting in Shanghai as he began the China leg of his tour of Asia. Obama acknowledged that the United States has struggled with race relations over the course of its history, but he said America would "always speak out" in favor of free expression, worship, political participation and access to information -- which he termed "universal rights."
BUSINESS
December 3, 2008 | Don Lee, Lee is a Times staff writer.
For two decades Chinese officials and Walt Disney Co. have batted around ideas for a theme park in the eastern fringes of Shanghai, only to see them go nowhere. "People have always been saying they'll build here," said Sun Jinbao, 61, a farmer near Zhaohang village, where several years ago Disney executives stood on the roof of a three-story building, peering out at the rice fields and wooded lands. But now the excitement is building again.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Authorities detained a Hong Kong Chinese student attempting to board a flight home from Shanghai's airport Sunday, and there were clear signals that China's leaders are also expanding their campaign of political intimidation from Beijing to provincial cities. The arrest of the student, Yao Yongzhan, 19, was reported on government-controlled Shanghai Television Sunday evening along with accounts of raids on a local political party, a dissident association and an underground labor organization.
TRAVEL
April 25, 1999 | MIKE MEYER, Mike Meyer is an American writer and teacher in Beijing
In Beijing, where I've made my home for the last few years, there is a fixation on the question of whether Shanghai is better than the capital city. The answer was settled for me before I was hardly out of Shanghai's airport. The "second city" impressed me immediately with, of all things, a tollbooth. It wasn't roofed with a flat piece of concrete but with a sweep of metal fashioned in a sine curve. My taxi driver thought I was making too much out of it, but he slowed so I could snap a photo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing international productions to Shanghai's new Grand Theater is an art in itself. As the government backs away from its old role as organizer, promoter and gatekeeper, arranging this season's best acts seems to be a one-man show. That man is Bonko Chan, the vice president of the largest state-owned air-cargo company in China, who produces operas in his spare time. "I was sitting with a friend," he said, perched atilt in a broken office chair, "and we were a little bit bored.
NEWS
October 19, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was supposed to be this legendary city's proudest moment, a chance to showcase itself as the most dazzling metropolis in Communist China and the fastest-growing economic center in Asia. No other city in the region promises as much growth in the face of global economic meltdown. No other Asian city could point to a more uplifting urban-renewal effort. And no other city, in all likelihood, would elevate an economic summit to an Olympics-scale event.
NEWS
February 7, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Han Wenzhen lives alone in a one-room apartment with no heat, no hot water and no indoor bathroom. A separate kitchen, shared by three families, is hard to reach using her crutches. But this is home, and the 75-year-old retired textile worker can't imagine living here without frequent visits from her neighbor. He Min, also 75, has no physical ailments and plenty of time on her hands.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2008 | Don Lee, Lee is a Times staff writer.
For two decades Chinese officials and Walt Disney Co. have batted around ideas for a theme park in the eastern fringes of Shanghai, only to see them go nowhere. "People have always been saying they'll build here," said Sun Jinbao, 61, a farmer near Zhaohang village, where several years ago Disney executives stood on the roof of a three-story building, peering out at the rice fields and wooded lands. But now the excitement is building again.
WORLD
July 22, 2006 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
They cursed. They smashed beer bottles. They pushed and shoved. "Qiang fangzi! Qiang fangzi!" they shouted. "House robbers! House robbers!" In a rare public melee Friday in this bustling city, several dozen residents along the Bund riverfront district protested the forced eviction of a neighbor, who watched helplessly as migrant workers, shielded by about 20 police, loaded his possessions onto a truck.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2004 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
May a hundred bunnies bloom. Playboy Enterprises Inc. said Monday that it planned to open a club here, the largest city in a country where the government keeps so tight a check on pornography that Playboy magazine is banned. Playboy Club Shanghai, scheduled to open late next year, would mark the revival of the members-only establishment, which got its start in Chicago in 1960. The last of the 22 U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
"Give my regards to ... Drama Avenue?" Shanghai, once the nightlife capital of Asia, hopes to revive some of its former glamour with a downtown theater district, newspapers reported Tuesday. Called Drama Avenue, city officials are touting it as Shanghai's answer to London's West End and New York's theater district, the subject of George M. Cohan's 1904 song "Give My Regards to Broadway." The street will link at least nine theaters.
NEWS
October 19, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was supposed to be this legendary city's proudest moment, a chance to showcase itself as the most dazzling metropolis in Communist China and the fastest-growing economic center in Asia. No other city in the region promises as much growth in the face of global economic meltdown. No other Asian city could point to a more uplifting urban-renewal effort. And no other city, in all likelihood, would elevate an economic summit to an Olympics-scale event.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | From Reuters
Workers with sledgehammers began demolishing a century-old mansion Tuesday that was occupied for years by I.M. Pei's family, despite an appeal from the renowned architect for its preservation. "It's a real shame. . . . There was nothing at all we could do," said Bei Naizheng, 44, a distant relative of Pei who uses the Chinese spelling of the family name. The city ordered her and other clan members out last weekend.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1994 | From Reuters
In a spectacular turnaround that shattered every record on Shanghai's roller-coaster stock market, investors Friday unleashed another buying wave that sent the index soaring by 108.50% for the week. The Shanghai Class A share index for domestic investors surged 22.31% on Friday to 700.58 points. Its twin on the market in the southern Special Economic Zone of Shenzhen added 10.52% to 165.92.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1988 | From Reuter
China has opened the door to bond trading, but in Shanghai, once Asia's financial capital, most of the business is still waiting to come inside. Dozens of bond traders cluster in their own makeshift trading "pit" in a dusty street, just a few footsteps from the biggest official exchange. "Why should I trade in there?" asked a trader, pointing to the front door of the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, one of this city's eight officially sanctioned exchanges, which began trading last week.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the most populated city in the most populated country in the world. What happens when all these people answer nature's call? The government would rather you never ask. They hope you never stray beyond Shanghai's impressive landmarks. Or stumble across the small detachment of women in the gutter of the city, still performing backbreaking labor in a landscape completely at odds with the popular image of modern Shanghai.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Want to drive in Shanghai? Better not be too short, weak in the arms, colorblind or suffering from high blood pressure, nervousness or an inability to jump into the air with bent legs and then land without wobbling. Most of all, you cannot have a missing or broken thumb. Otherwise, your chances of sitting in the driver's seat in China's fast-paced economic capital will be nil.
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