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Shanghai China Development And Redevelopment

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June 18, 1995 | Orville Schell, Orville Schell is one of America's foremost China watchers. His last article for this magazine was about rock singer Cui Jian. His book "Mandate of Heaven: A New Generation of Entrepreneurs, Dissidents, Bohemians and Technocrats Lays Claim to China's Future" was published last fall by Simon & Schuster.
This past February, when Shanghai International Securities, China's largest brokerage house, suddenly found itself staring at losses of upward to $150 million in the bond futures market, it wrote a new chapter in the history of this mutant people's republic by trying to manipulate the market with a mass selloff minutes before closing time. The next morning, stunned officials on Shanghai's infant securities exchange were forced into another unprecedented move.
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NEWS
June 4, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Xu Hanlin and his wife were awakened by a knock at the door. Before they could answer it, a demolition crew had kicked the door in, started to throw their furniture out in the rain and slammed sledgehammers through the walls. When Xu tried to stop them, a worker planted a boot in his stomach. The Xus are among tens of thousands of people who have been told that they have to vacate their homes this year to make way for burgeoning Shanghai's new highways and skyscrapers.
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NEWS
June 4, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Xu Hanlin and his wife were awakened by a knock at the door. Before they could answer it, a demolition crew had kicked the door in, started to throw their furniture out in the rain and slammed sledgehammers through the walls. When Xu tried to stop them, a worker planted a boot in his stomach. The Xus are among tens of thousands of people who have been told that they have to vacate their homes this year to make way for burgeoning Shanghai's new highways and skyscrapers.
MAGAZINE
June 18, 1995 | Orville Schell, Orville Schell is one of America's foremost China watchers. His last article for this magazine was about rock singer Cui Jian. His book "Mandate of Heaven: A New Generation of Entrepreneurs, Dissidents, Bohemians and Technocrats Lays Claim to China's Future" was published last fall by Simon & Schuster.
This past February, when Shanghai International Securities, China's largest brokerage house, suddenly found itself staring at losses of upward to $150 million in the bond futures market, it wrote a new chapter in the history of this mutant people's republic by trying to manipulate the market with a mass selloff minutes before closing time. The next morning, stunned officials on Shanghai's infant securities exchange were forced into another unprecedented move.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when Shanghai was known as the Paris of the Orient, part of its skyline was dominated by two huge cartoon figures. "High overhead a giant Chinese baby was shown at its mother's breasts, refusing to suck," Barbara Walker, a chronicler of the 1920s scene, wrote of the neon baby-formula advertisement. "It turned away with a grimace of disgust, then complacently accepted a long drink of patent milk, which glugged visibly in the bottle.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when Shanghai was known as the Paris of the Orient, part of its skyline was dominated by two huge cartoon figures. "High overhead a giant Chinese baby was shown at its mother's breasts, refusing to suck," Barbara Walker, a chronicler of the 1920s scene, wrote of the neon baby-formula advertisement. "It turned away with a grimace of disgust, then complacently accepted a long drink of patent milk, which glugged visibly in the bottle.
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