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Shanghai Disneyland

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WORLD
November 4, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Co. signed an agreement with a Shanghai government company Friday to build a long-awaited theme park in the commercial capital of China, both parties said. The signing moves the $3.6-billion Shanghai Disneyland closer to becoming a reality 15 years after the two sides first opened discussions on the project. The deal was struck with Shanghai Shen Di Group Co. Ltd., a municipal company registered in August and inaugurated Friday that will serve as Disney's joint venture partner.
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NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The brief announcement that Disney plans to add a Marvel-themed land to Hong Kong Disneyland in 2017 raises a host of questions: Will Iron Man, Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four and the X-Men be getting their own rides? When will the Marvel characters be coming to Anaheim, Paris, Tokyo or Shanghai? And why, of all places, Hong Kong? Many of the most basic questions remain unanswered, in part because the announcement was made by a Hong Kong government official rather than Disney.
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NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The blurry, fuzzy concept art of a Shanghai Disneyland , filled with fireworks, spotlights and a great big castle, paints a picture short on details and vague on specifics about the planned project in China. So why all the secrecy on Disney's part? Three reasons: * To prevent knockoff rides by rival Asian theme parks, which happened before Hong Kong Disneyland's 2005 opening. * To preserve creative flexibility for Disney's Imagineers during the ongoing "Blue Sky" development phase, when rides, shows and even entire lands appear or disappear.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2013 | By Don Lee
It took seven years and a little help from Toy Story and Grizzly Gulch, but Hong Kong Disneyland has finally broken into the black. The theme park, which opened in 2005 amid much fanfare and hopes of cashing in on the rising middle-class in mainland China, said Monday that it posted its first annual profit in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 29. The earnings of $14.1 million reversed a loss of $30.6 million in the prior 12-month period. Revenue jumped 18% to $550.7 million as attendance rose 13% from the prior year to a record 6.7 million visitors.
WORLD
April 8, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Robert A. Iger was joined by Shanghai's Communist Party chief and the city's mayor Friday to officially commence construction of a long-awaited theme park that will give the Burbank company a critical beachhead in mainland China. In a carefully staged groundbreaking ceremony interspersed with singing and dancing, Iger said the new park would feature a blend of East and West and underscored the importance of the $3.7-billion project for Disney. "This is a defining moment in our company's history," Iger told the audience from an indoor stage set up across from the site of the planned resort, which he said would be "both authentically Disney and distinctly Chinese.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
As Walt Disney Co. prepares to break ground on its first theme park in mainland China, the significance for the company reaches well beyond the opportunity to sell legions of Mickey Mouse-ear hats. Although much smaller than Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla., the Shanghai park holds outsize importance for the company, because it would provide entree to a market of 1.3 billion people, 30 million of whom enter the middle class each year. When it opens in five years, the $3.7-billion tourist attraction would serve as a launching pad for Disney's broader ambitions in the region.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Co. will hold a ground-breaking ceremony Friday in Shanghai for a long-awaited theme park and resort, sources close to the matter said. The event could mark the end of 16 years of speculation over when Disney would begin building its first theme park in mainland China. The $3.6-billion project was first discussed in 1995 and would be the company's fourth theme park and resort outside the United States. About 1,700 acres have been designated for the park in northeast Shanghai.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2013 | By Don Lee
It took seven years and a little help from Toy Story and Grizzly Gulch, but Hong Kong Disneyland has finally broken into the black. The theme park, which opened in 2005 amid much fanfare and hopes of cashing in on the rising middle-class in mainland China, said Monday that it posted its first annual profit in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 29. The earnings of $14.1 million reversed a loss of $30.6 million in the prior 12-month period. Revenue jumped 18% to $550.7 million as attendance rose 13% from the prior year to a record 6.7 million visitors.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The brief announcement that Disney plans to add a Marvel-themed land to Hong Kong Disneyland in 2017 raises a host of questions: Will Iron Man, Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four and the X-Men be getting their own rides? When will the Marvel characters be coming to Anaheim, Paris, Tokyo or Shanghai? And why, of all places, Hong Kong? Many of the most basic questions remain unanswered, in part because the announcement was made by a Hong Kong government official rather than Disney.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Monkey Kingdom theme park, expected to open in 2014 outside Beijing, is based on an ancient folk tale as common to China's residents as Santa Claus is to Americans. Based on the 16th century " Journey to the West " folk tale, the project presented a daunting task for Thinkwell , the Burbank-based company charged with designing the theme park, said Chief Executive Joe Zenas. "There's nothing like it in Western literature," Zenas said. Photos : Concept art of China's Monkey Kingdom theme park Thinkwell creative director Dave Cobb immediately seized on the seemingly endless storytelling possibilities that could be told through the universal languages of spectacle, thrill and emotion.
NEWS
December 26, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The theme park industry will take a deep breath in 2013 after the launch of several landmark attractions and with more groundbreaking projects on the horizon. The last few years have seen several theme park additions that have altered the industry landscape and set attendance records -- from Cars Land at Disney California Adventure to Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal's Islands of Adventure. The future promises even more theme park innovation in the form of Shanghai Disneyland in China and Avatar Land at Disney's Animal Kingdom in Florida.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Monkey Kingdom theme park, expected to open in 2014 outside Beijing, is based on an ancient folk tale as common to China's residents as Santa Claus is to Americans. Based on the 16th century " Journey to the West " folk tale, the project presented a daunting task for Thinkwell , the Burbank-based company charged with designing the theme park, said Chief Executive Joe Zenas. "There's nothing like it in Western literature," Zenas said. Photos : Concept art of China's Monkey Kingdom theme park Thinkwell creative director Dave Cobb immediately seized on the seemingly endless storytelling possibilities that could be told through the universal languages of spectacle, thrill and emotion.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The blurry, fuzzy concept art of a Shanghai Disneyland , filled with fireworks, spotlights and a great big castle, paints a picture short on details and vague on specifics about the planned project in China. So why all the secrecy on Disney's part? Three reasons: * To prevent knockoff rides by rival Asian theme parks, which happened before Hong Kong Disneyland's 2005 opening. * To preserve creative flexibility for Disney's Imagineers during the ongoing "Blue Sky" development phase, when rides, shows and even entire lands appear or disappear.
WORLD
April 8, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Robert A. Iger was joined by Shanghai's Communist Party chief and the city's mayor Friday to officially commence construction of a long-awaited theme park that will give the Burbank company a critical beachhead in mainland China. In a carefully staged groundbreaking ceremony interspersed with singing and dancing, Iger said the new park would feature a blend of East and West and underscored the importance of the $3.7-billion project for Disney. "This is a defining moment in our company's history," Iger told the audience from an indoor stage set up across from the site of the planned resort, which he said would be "both authentically Disney and distinctly Chinese.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
As Walt Disney Co. prepares to break ground on its first theme park in mainland China, the significance for the company reaches well beyond the opportunity to sell legions of Mickey Mouse-ear hats. Although much smaller than Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla., the Shanghai park holds outsize importance for the company, because it would provide entree to a market of 1.3 billion people, 30 million of whom enter the middle class each year. When it opens in five years, the $3.7-billion tourist attraction would serve as a launching pad for Disney's broader ambitions in the region.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Co. will hold a ground-breaking ceremony Friday in Shanghai for a long-awaited theme park and resort, sources close to the matter said. The event could mark the end of 16 years of speculation over when Disney would begin building its first theme park in mainland China. The $3.6-billion project was first discussed in 1995 and would be the company's fourth theme park and resort outside the United States. About 1,700 acres have been designated for the park in northeast Shanghai.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Co. signed an agreement with a company operated by the Shanghai government Friday to build a long-awaited theme park in the commercial capital of China, both parties said. The signing, 15 years after the two sides first opened discussions on the project, moves the $3.6-billion Shanghai Disneyland closer to becoming a reality. The deal was struck with Shanghai Shen Di Group Co., a municipal company registered in August and inaugurated Friday that will serve as Disney's joint partner in the joint venture.
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