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Shanghai Kunqu Opera Troupe

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
The members of Shanghai Kunqu Opera had a problem on Monday: the 15-mile trip to the airport for their plane flight to America. The mass transit system had been shut down for days. Angry student protesters, sympathetic to their bloodied and massacred colleagues in Beijing, had deflated the tires of public buses. Sabotaged vehicles blocked roadways. People, in a panic over the turmoil engulfing the city of more than 12 million, flooded the streets to buy food and supplies. Problems due to civil strife already had delayed the departure of the Shanghai Kunqu Opera Troupe for three weeks.
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NEWS
August 1, 1989 | VALARIE BASHEDA, Times Staff Writer
Eight members of the Shanghai Opera, including its leader, apparently defected last week while the troupe was on tour here just days before they were scheduled to return to China. According to Jeffery Shia, a city accountant and president of a local Chinese association, the musicians from the state opera company disappeared at different times between last Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning. The group was scheduled to return to China last Thursday morning. As of Monday, U.S.
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NEWS
August 1, 1989 | VALARIE BASHEDA, Times Staff Writer
Eight members of the Shanghai Opera, including its leader, apparently defected last week while the troupe was on tour here just days before they were scheduled to return to China. According to Jeffery Shia, a city accountant and president of a local Chinese association, the musicians from the state opera company disappeared at different times between last Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning. The group was scheduled to return to China last Thursday morning. As of Monday, U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
The members of Shanghai Kunqu Opera had a problem on Monday: the 15-mile trip to the airport for their plane flight to America. The mass transit system had been shut down for days. Angry student protesters, sympathetic to their bloodied and massacred colleagues in Beijing, had deflated the tires of public buses. Sabotaged vehicles blocked roadways. People, in a panic over the turmoil engulfing the city of more than 12 million, flooded the streets to buy food and supplies. Problems due to civil strife already had delayed the departure of the Shanghai Kunqu Opera Troupe for three weeks.
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