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Shanghai Museum

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TRAVEL
December 22, 2002
Having taught air traffic control in China for five years, I understand and enjoy China. Arthur Frommer's advice to limit your first trip to Beijing, Xi'an and Shanghai ("China Amazes, and the Journey Keeps Getting Easier," Dec. 8) is right on the money. There is so much to absorb in those cities that you will not get the full effect by trying to do more. As he advised, visiting the Shanghai Museum is a must; it is wonderful. However, Xi'an has an almost equally excellent museum, the Shaanxi Provincial History Museum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
A new exhibition of Chinese Ming dynasty paintings includes just 10 works, one each by 10 artists, but it's more absorbing than many shows two or three times its size. These 15th and early-16th century paintings are high-wire acts of aesthetic dexterity, fusing philosophical perception with formal persuasion. At the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "Ming Masterpieces from the Shanghai Museum" is focused on court painters associated with the imperial painting academy in Beijing's Forbidden City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
SEVEN years ago, Anne Shih was visiting the Shanghai Museum, a stronghold of Chinese art and antiquities, when she tossed out a suggestion to Director Chen Xiejun: What about an exhibition loan to the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, where Shih is a board member? All right, she remembers Chen saying, if you can build a new space to house the show, we'll arrange it.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
SEVEN years ago, Anne Shih was visiting the Shanghai Museum, a stronghold of Chinese art and antiquities, when she tossed out a suggestion to Director Chen Xiejun: What about an exhibition loan to the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, where Shih is a board member? All right, she remembers Chen saying, if you can build a new space to house the show, we'll arrange it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
DOES anyone go to Shanghai to see contemporary art? It isn't even mentioned in standard tour books touting the Shanghai Museum's ancient bronzes, Pudong's glittering skyline and shopping, shopping, shopping.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's itinerary hadn't been published in any Chinese newspaper. But five days before his arrival, consultant Philip Qiu knew exactly what the American leader plans to do here. Qiu saw the news on a Chinese-language Web site, and he wasn't the only one: The page registered almost 800,000 hits in two days. "This is the way in Shanghai," he says. "There is still an impulse to control what people know and do, but there are more and more ways around it.
TRAVEL
April 25, 1999 | MIKE MEYER, Mike Meyer is an American writer and teacher in Beijing
In Beijing, where I've made my home for the last few years, there is a fixation on the question of whether Shanghai is better than the capital city. The answer was settled for me before I was hardly out of Shanghai's airport. The "second city" impressed me immediately with, of all things, a tollbooth. It wasn't roofed with a flat piece of concrete but with a sweep of metal fashioned in a sine curve. My taxi driver thought I was making too much out of it, but he slowed so I could snap a photo.
TRAVEL
November 17, 2002 | Robert J. Myers, Special to The Times
Gritty and crowded, Shanghai has a vibrant street life and a history of intrigue, but most of all it has a proven capacity to reinvent itself -- something I had heard was now happening at a maniacal pace. The city, home to 15 million, is the heart of China's burgeoning economic development and has become one of the world's fastest-changing places as the government heaps millions into the economy and permanently alters the skyline with a host of new skyscrapers.
TRAVEL
October 13, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY
In People's Park, where Red Guards used to wave Mao's little red books and smash relics of a feudal past, the new Shanghai Art Museum was scheduled to open this weekend with a display of venerable national treasures, including a bronze collection reputed to be among the finest in the world. The $70-million museum itself resembles a bronze urn--but that's just a coincidence, says museum Director Ma Chengyuan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | JOE McDONALD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The painting of Mao Tse-tung as a Renaissance saint was too risky for the Shanghai 2000 Biennial. The photo of a man eating a dead baby was too disturbing. The works, rejected by the Shanghai Art Museum's official contemporary art show, went on display at private galleries. That's when police raided a gallery and seized the exhibits. The two-month Biennial, with 67 artists from 15 countries, is China's bid to join the club of biannual art extravaganzas led by Venice and New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
DOES anyone go to Shanghai to see contemporary art? It isn't even mentioned in standard tour books touting the Shanghai Museum's ancient bronzes, Pudong's glittering skyline and shopping, shopping, shopping.
TRAVEL
December 22, 2002
Having taught air traffic control in China for five years, I understand and enjoy China. Arthur Frommer's advice to limit your first trip to Beijing, Xi'an and Shanghai ("China Amazes, and the Journey Keeps Getting Easier," Dec. 8) is right on the money. There is so much to absorb in those cities that you will not get the full effect by trying to do more. As he advised, visiting the Shanghai Museum is a must; it is wonderful. However, Xi'an has an almost equally excellent museum, the Shaanxi Provincial History Museum.
TRAVEL
November 17, 2002 | Robert J. Myers, Special to The Times
Gritty and crowded, Shanghai has a vibrant street life and a history of intrigue, but most of all it has a proven capacity to reinvent itself -- something I had heard was now happening at a maniacal pace. The city, home to 15 million, is the heart of China's burgeoning economic development and has become one of the world's fastest-changing places as the government heaps millions into the economy and permanently alters the skyline with a host of new skyscrapers.
TRAVEL
April 25, 1999 | MIKE MEYER, Mike Meyer is an American writer and teacher in Beijing
In Beijing, where I've made my home for the last few years, there is a fixation on the question of whether Shanghai is better than the capital city. The answer was settled for me before I was hardly out of Shanghai's airport. The "second city" impressed me immediately with, of all things, a tollbooth. It wasn't roofed with a flat piece of concrete but with a sweep of metal fashioned in a sine curve. My taxi driver thought I was making too much out of it, but he slowed so I could snap a photo.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's itinerary hadn't been published in any Chinese newspaper. But five days before his arrival, consultant Philip Qiu knew exactly what the American leader plans to do here. Qiu saw the news on a Chinese-language Web site, and he wasn't the only one: The page registered almost 800,000 hits in two days. "This is the way in Shanghai," he says. "There is still an impulse to control what people know and do, but there are more and more ways around it.
TRAVEL
October 13, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY
In People's Park, where Red Guards used to wave Mao's little red books and smash relics of a feudal past, the new Shanghai Art Museum was scheduled to open this weekend with a display of venerable national treasures, including a bronze collection reputed to be among the finest in the world. The $70-million museum itself resembles a bronze urn--but that's just a coincidence, says museum Director Ma Chengyuan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
A new exhibition of Chinese Ming dynasty paintings includes just 10 works, one each by 10 artists, but it's more absorbing than many shows two or three times its size. These 15th and early-16th century paintings are high-wire acts of aesthetic dexterity, fusing philosophical perception with formal persuasion. At the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "Ming Masterpieces from the Shanghai Museum" is focused on court painters associated with the imperial painting academy in Beijing's Forbidden City.
TRAVEL
January 19, 1997
As ex-pats returning to Shanghai from home leave in Bakersfield, we read the article "11 Galleries Open at Shanghai Museum" ("News, Tips & Bargains," Oct. 13). On Christmas Day, my husband and I went to see the new Shanghai Art Museum and had a little chuckle over the article's information on the price of admission as 25 cents for adults and 6 cents for children. It was 60 RMB each, which is about $7.50. AGNES M. COLEMAN Shanghai, China
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