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Shanghai Surprise

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
John Lone--who's worked only sporadically since starring in the 1987 Academy Award-winning "The Last Emperor"--will return to the screen in "Shanghai 1920," starring as an Asian underworld crime lord opposite a yet-to-be-cast American actor. The epic, English-language gangster drama spans the years 1910 to 1936, which encompassed the beginnings of Communism in China, as well as warfare with the Japanese.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 2009 | Don Lee
With the Beijing Olympics over, China is counting down to its next big coming-out party: the Expo 2010 World's Fair in Shanghai. But will the U.S. show up? With construction deadlines approaching, organizers of the American exhibit are scrambling to come up with tens of millions of dollars from corporate sponsors for a national pavilion. The recession has only added to longer-running problems that could end up with the U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
"Guns cause pain. Opium eases pain," says Madonna, the bobby-soxed missionary of "Shanghai Surprise." That's the somewhat bewildering rationale for a lady of the cloth to be scouring Shanghai for a vast missing opium shipment. Presumably, she and her mission chums will use this cache to help the Chinese wounded in 1937 during the Japanese occupation of China.
SPORTS
May 24, 2005 | Mike Hiserman, Times Staff Writer
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is at a basketball camp in Shanghai, leading a course for 55 young Asian players called "Basketball Psychology and Attitude." Along with teaching some fundamentals of the game, Abdul-Jabbar says his intention is to prepare the young men for situations they might not have experienced. Trash talking from opponents and pointed questions from the media, to name two.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987 | Patrick Goldstein
We're accustomed to overstatement in Hollywood press releases. But Vestron Video wins our Press Release of the Week Award for the company's proclamation on its new array of "blockbuster" home-video releases for spring. An excerpt: "Vestron Video has an impressive lineup of feature films slated for release in early 1987, including such blockbuster titles as 'Shanghai Surprise,' 'Tai Pan'. . . . " 'Shanghai Surprise' stars Hollywood's hottest couple, Sean Penn and Madonna.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986
After working with bride Madonna in "Shanghai Surprise," Sean Penn told the Chi Sun-Times' Roger Ebert: "She is one of the major actresses, ever." Just think of her stature when she makes her third film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1986
Fired film publicist Chris Nixon's bleat about how he was treated by Sean Penn during the filming of "Shanghai Surprise" raises disturbing questions (Calendar Letters, Sept. 28). Are we to assume that if Penn had agreed to the photo call Nixon described, the grosses of "Shanghai Surprise" would have been significantly better? Would the film have benefitted financially from Nixon's continued employment on the picture? Has Nixon improved his prospects for future employment by rushing to the typewriter to tittle-tattle about someone who told him to "buzz off"?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1986
I found Patrick Goldstein's fascinating "When Studios Smell Trouble, They Screen Out the Critics" (Sept. 7) particularly interesting because I was the Unit Publicist--for all of a day-and-a-half--on the Sean Penn/Madonna fiasco, "Shanghai Surprise," until Penn had me fired for daring to ask the two of them to sit in a rickshaw for a couple of photographers from Newsweek and the London Observer. Although my stay on that unfortunate farrago was brief, I could tell you some of the many horror stories that occurred during its production, due to the antics of what the British press brilliantly dubbed "The Poison Penns."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986
Is Sean Penn really a jerk? I don't care. Please, keep your reports to more vital subjects: Find out what color panties his wife wears. Is David Lynch a genius? Gosh, I just bet he is. I mean, everyone says so. He's probably a million times better than me. I believe that. I really do. My real question: A couple weeks ago a reviewer called the new film "Vasectomy" a piece of trash, in so many words. Well, gee! How can he say that? I haven't seen the film, but with a title like that it's bound to be fun!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1987
Interesting to read (Outtakes, Aug. 30) of the projected remake of Josef von Sternberg's "The Blue Angel," with Madonna, glamorous star of the smash hits "Shanghai Surprise" and "Who's That Girl," in the Marlene Dietrich role. Interesting, but mostly depressing. It's especially depressing to see one of the current hotshot writers, Neil Jimenez, trying to bolster his own rep with a backhanded swipe at the original. So the great films of the past aren't special-effects extravaganzas, with the latest film heroes and the noisiest rock scores in Dolby and THX. So what?
MAGAZINE
June 9, 1996 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
Lake Spring Cuisine in Monterey Park, recently reopened after a fire closed it for several months, is on the small side--at least compared to the area's football stadium-sized Cantonese seafood houses. Two modest dining rooms are freshly painted in pink and green, with wall-to-wall mirrors and big picture windows, tablecloths and Lazy Susans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1996 | Maggie Farley, Maggie Farley is a Times staff writer based in Hong Kong
Until last month, many of the finest art treasures from one of the world's proudest cultures were stashed in dark corners of a library, on storeroom shelves, in foreign collections and even in smugglers' warrens. Now, thanks to a tenacious director, two sophisticated mayors and generous donors, artworks stretching back thousands of years into Chinese history are on permanent, public display, many for the first time.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Xu Kuangdi, Shanghai's urbane deputy mayor, likes to regale foreign guests with the story of a provincial official who recently visited this booming city on China's east coast. The traffic was, as usual, impossible. Thousands of Volkswagen sedans, produced here in China's largest auto factory, clogged narrow lanes designed a century ago for rickshaws. Dust from 4,000 construction sites clouded the air. Sulfurous emissions from factories added the scent of heavy industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1987
Interesting to read (Outtakes, Aug. 30) of the projected remake of Josef von Sternberg's "The Blue Angel," with Madonna, glamorous star of the smash hits "Shanghai Surprise" and "Who's That Girl," in the Marlene Dietrich role. Interesting, but mostly depressing. It's especially depressing to see one of the current hotshot writers, Neil Jimenez, trying to bolster his own rep with a backhanded swipe at the original. So the great films of the past aren't special-effects extravaganzas, with the latest film heroes and the noisiest rock scores in Dolby and THX. So what?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987 | Patrick Goldstein
We're accustomed to overstatement in Hollywood press releases. But Vestron Video wins our Press Release of the Week Award for the company's proclamation on its new array of "blockbuster" home-video releases for spring. An excerpt: "Vestron Video has an impressive lineup of feature films slated for release in early 1987, including such blockbuster titles as 'Shanghai Surprise,' 'Tai Pan'. . . . " 'Shanghai Surprise' stars Hollywood's hottest couple, Sean Penn and Madonna.
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