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Shannan Taylor

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March 10, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One look at his father, Steve, convinced Shannan Taylor that he didn't want to follow in Steve's footsteps--footsteps that led into the coal mines of New South Wales, Australia. One look at Steve's elbows, which are plastic. One look at Steve's right hand, which he can't turn over. One look at Steve's arm, through which run jagged scars. Steve nearly was crushed by a mining car, an accident that also left an imprint on the impressionable mind of his son, who was 8 at the time.
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SPORTS
March 10, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One look at his father, Steve, convinced Shannan Taylor that he didn't want to follow in Steve's footsteps--footsteps that led into the coal mines of New South Wales, Australia. One look at Steve's elbows, which are plastic. One look at Steve's right hand, which he can't turn over. One look at Steve's arm, through which run jagged scars. Steve nearly was crushed by a mining car, an accident that also left an imprint on the impressionable mind of his son, who was 8 at the time.
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SPORTS
April 21, 2000 | PAUL GUTIERREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A junior-lightweight title fight will be one of five bouts on the undercard of the Oscar De La Hoya-Sugar Shane Mosley fight June 17 at Staples Center. Diego Corrales (31-0 with 25 knockouts) will defend his International Boxing Federation 130-pound championship against Justin Juuko (34-3-2, 25 KOs). If he beats Juuko, Corrales wants to to fight World Boxing Council junior-lightweight champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. "That's the next step for me--unifying the title," said Corrales, of Sacramento.
SPORTS
February 10, 2001 | LANCE PUGMIRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Mosley typically discourages training camp talk of future opponents, but the father, trainer and manager of Pomona's World Boxing Council welterweight champion, Shane Mosley, makes an exception when the subject is Felix Trinidad Jr. "It makes all the sense in the world," Jack Mosley said from Big Bear, where his son is preparing for his second title defense March 10 against Australian Shannan Taylor. "We know Trinidad is at 154 pounds and ready to move to 160. That's OK.
SPORTS
September 27, 2008 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Ten months ago, in the despair of a hard-fought unanimous-decision loss to then-world welterweight champion Miguel Cotto, Pomona's Shane Mosley admitted retirement crossed his mind. He resolved instead to fight on, insisting he'd restrict his future bouts only to major events. Mosley (44-5, 37 knockouts) was pitted in a non-title fight against another veteran beaten by Cotto, Zab Judah. But when Judah was injured in a training camp tantrum, Mosley's May bout was canceled.
SPORTS
July 21, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER
At Wednesday's kickoff news conference at Las Vegas' Caesars Palace, Shane Mosley had a message for Adrian Stone, the man against whom he will defend his World Boxing Council welterweight title tonight. I'm going to take your head off? You will rue the day you stepped into the ring against me? You will have to kill me to beat me? No, none of those things. Instead, Mosley smiled and said, "I'd like to say happy birthday to Adrian Stone."
SPORTS
March 11, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bit of advice for Oscar De La Hoya: Go to 154 pounds as soon as possible and do not look back. World Boxing Council welterweight champion Shane Mosley, looking more terrifying and unbeatable than ever, bolstered his argument that he is not only the best in his weight division but the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world with a complete and devastating performance against Shannan Taylor in a Caesars Palace ballroom Saturday night in front of a sellout crowd of 3,000 plus.
SPORTS
March 10, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER
Dear Evander: I know you don't want to hear this. I know you won't pay any attention, but . . . Give it up. It's over. You've had a great career. Now, you've got nothing to gain and brain cells to lose. Tex Cobb, who made a career of being a tomato can in the ring, once was asked how long he was going to continue to fight. "As long as they have the money," Cobb said, "I've got the brain cells." Funny line. Sad line. And for you, Evander Holyfield, at this point, a very apt line.
SPORTS
October 6, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disappointed about his stagnation as a boxer, , tired of fighting no-name, no-threat opponents, fed up with watching one megafight after another from his living room, World Boxing Council welterweight champion Shane Mosley says he has taken command of his career. Mosley won't go so far as to say he will be his own manager. His manager is his father Jack, who has guided Shane's career, both in and out of the ring, since he first laced on a pair of gloves when he was 8.
SPORTS
June 18, 2000 | PAUL GUTIERREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't take long for Erik Morales to make his presence felt in the featherweight division--less than a round. That's all it took for Morales, making his featherweight debut, to knock Mike Juarez down. It was the first of three knockdowns for Morales en route to a third-round technical knockout victory. Morales' triumph highlighted the undercard of the Oscar De La Hoya--Shane Mosley welterweight title fight at Staples Center on Saturday night.
SPORTS
February 10, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER
When he enters the ring at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas on March 24 to face Arturo Gatti, Oscar De La Hoya will be staring into the camera. But whose camera? HBO has a contract with De La Hoya for his next four fights, the one against Gatti worth $4.5 million to De La Hoya. But that might not be enough. De La Hoya's handlers, emboldened by their surprising legal victory over promoter Bob Arum last month, have put the gloves back on to take on the cable network.
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