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Shannon Faulkner

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August 14, 1995 | From Associated Press
Shannon Faulkner rose to a rap on her barracks door at The Citadel at 6:10 a.m. Sunday and spent her first full day on campus taking personality and writing tests and attending chapel. Federal marshals shadowed her movements, and video cameras monitored the hallway outside her third-floor barracks room. Faulkner is the first female cadet in the history of the 152-year-old publicly funded military college, which fought to keep her out.
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NEWS
January 28, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In Glory's Shadow" is a powerful book that, like a hurricane, grows in force as it proceeds. It is ostensibly about Shannon Faulkner's attempt to become the first female student at the all-male Citadel, the old military college in Charleston, S.C. But it soon turns out that Faulkner is almost incidental to the story that Catherine Manegold, who covered the story for the New York Times, develops in all its Southern gothic intensity.
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NEWS
August 13, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The sound of tradition crumbling echoed across the Deep South on Saturday as Shannon Faulkner took her place among the corps of cadets at The Citadel, an all-male bastion for 152 years. In the wake of death threats, Faulkner, the first female admitted to the state-supported military school, was accompanied by four U.S. marshals as well as her parents as she pulled up to the walled campus about 7:30 a.m.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
Shannon Faulkner, who fought a legal battle to open the all-male military academy The Citadel to women, has graduated from a college 200 miles across the state and plans to become a teacher. Faulkner earned a bachelor's degree in secondary education of English this month at Anderson College, one of two schools she attended after dropping out of The Citadel. Faulkner made national headlines when she sued The Citadel in 1993 seeking admission.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In Glory's Shadow" is a powerful book that, like a hurricane, grows in force as it proceeds. It is ostensibly about Shannon Faulkner's attempt to become the first female student at the all-male Citadel, the old military college in Charleston, S.C. But it soon turns out that Faulkner is almost incidental to the story that Catherine Manegold, who covered the story for the New York Times, develops in all its Southern gothic intensity.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after winning her two-year fight to gain entrance to The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner on Friday said she was dropping out of the all-male military college, the victim of stress. "I do not think there's any dishonor in leaving," Faulkner told reporters outside The Citadel, the 152-year-old state-funded academy in Charleston, S.C. "I think there's [no] justice in my staying and killing myself just for the political point."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995
Redefining women's suffrage: Shannon Faulkner's one week at The Citadel. HUGH GLENN Irvine
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first four women to take the Citadel's oath in the school's 153-year history were sworn in along with 572 men. Wearing gray duty uniforms and black caps, the Class of 2000 marched onto the school's parade grounds for the ceremony, which was attended by parents, school officials and residents. Although the Charleston, S.C., academy was forced by court order to admit Shannon Faulkner last year, she became ill and missed the swearing-in ceremony.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | Associated Press
A private women's college voted Thursday to go along with a plan to keep women out of the all-male Citadel, agreeing to sponsor an alternative program for women seeking to become cadets. Converse College trustees approved by voice vote the state's proposal to create a women's leadership program, President Sandra Thomas said. The $10-million program could begin by August, the deadline the courts have set for The Citadel to admit Shannon Faulkner as a cadet or provide her with an alternative.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
If Shannon Faulkner wants to be the first woman to march with The Citadel's all-male corps of cadets she should have to look like one, crew cut and all, the college told a judge. Her lawyers, however, said the requirement would be punitive and inconsistent with the way the military treats women. The state-supported military school in South Carolina originally accepted Faulkner but changed its mind when it discovered that she is a woman. U.S. District Judge C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997
Re "The Predictable Citadel," editorial, Jan. 14: It is abundantly clear that the anti-military media, including The Times, are willing to tolerate the continued existence of The Citadel only if it becomes a bastion of gender sensitivity. That is not going to happen. War is hell, and The Citadel has the mission of preparing its students for war. That is not quite the same as attending a seminar hosted by Gloria Allred or Anita Hill. At The Citadel, some students can take it. Others can't, and drop out. Some of these dropouts hire lawyers and stage press conferences.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first four women to take the Citadel's oath in the school's 153-year history were sworn in along with 572 men. Wearing gray duty uniforms and black caps, the Class of 2000 marched onto the school's parade grounds for the ceremony, which was attended by parents, school officials and residents. Although the Charleston, S.C., academy was forced by court order to admit Shannon Faulkner last year, she became ill and missed the swearing-in ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995
Redefining women's suffrage: Shannon Faulkner's one week at The Citadel. HUGH GLENN Irvine
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1995 | Dana Parsons
I'm writing this on Friday evening, about 24 hours before Mike Tyson's celebrated return to Las Vegas and several hours after Shannon Faulkner's celebrated departure from the Citadel. Not that the two events have anything in common or say anything about America in 1995, but let's juxtapose a few developments from each case . . . * * Tyson, 29, spent three years in prison and returns as something of a hero to millions of people.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shannon Faulkner has stepped aside, but now her lawyers are trying to assemble new female recruits to storm the walls of The Citadel, South Carolina's all-male military college. Faulkner has been hailed as a heroine by feminist groups for temporarily integrating the school. But the court ruling that opened The Citadel's doors specifically benefited her--it did not require that other women be admitted. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995 | DANA PARSONS
I'm writing this on Friday evening, about 24 hours before Mike Tyson's celebrated return to Las Vegas and several hours after Shannon Faulkner's celebrated departure from the Citadel. Not that the two events have anything in common or say anything about America in 1995, but let's juxtapose a few developments from each case . . . * Tyson, 29, spent three years in prison and returns as something of a hero to millions of people.
NEWS
August 2, 1994 | Associated Press
The Citadel may shave Shannon Faulkner's head when she becomes the first woman to join the school's corps of cadets, a judge ruled Monday. U.S. District Judge C. Weston Houck also ordered Faulkner to stay in a private room in the college's infirmary instead of its barracks. And he rejected her request for a sexual harassment committee to monitor her progress in the corps. Faulkner's attorneys argued that she should not be subjected to the humiliation of having her head shaved.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court opened the way Thursday for Shannon Faulkner to become the first woman to take part in military training at The Citadel. A panel of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed that South Carolina's all-male military college violated Faulkner's rights under the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment in refusing to admit her. The 2-1 decision upheld an order last July by U.S. District Judge C.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was perhaps inevitable that the saga at The Citadel would end this way, with the young woman who shattered more than a century and a half of tradition feeling shattered herself, facing reporters in the gray afternoon to wipe away rain and tears and dreams, not only her own but those of so many others who had been rooting for her. And so it was that 20-year-old Shannon Faulkner took her place beside Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.
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