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Shannon Lucid

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NEWS
December 3, 1996 | From Associated Press
Shannon Lucid, the astronaut who spent a record 188 days in space this year, became the first woman to be awarded the congressional Space Medal of Honor. President Clinton praised her Monday as a "determined visionary." In an Oval Office ceremony, Lucid said her history-making flight aboard the Russian space station Mir was a story of "two great space-faring nations" cooperating on a landmark mission and setting the stage for more joint exploration.
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NEWS
December 8, 1996 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Since returning from a record-smashing six months in space, celebrity astronaut Shannon Lucid has been making the rounds. Not the talk-show rounds. Not yet, anyway. The bookstore rounds. One of the things Lucid missed most while living on the Russian space station Mir was browsing through bookstores, so she's making up for lost time. "We landed on a Thursday, didn't we?
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NEWS
September 8, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Astronaut Shannon Lucid's mission to the Russian Mir space station entered the record books as the longest spaceflight by a woman. It was a record Lucid was not expecting to break. Her tour of duty aboard the orbiting outpost was supposed to have ended in early August, but shuttle booster problems, scheduling conflicts and Hurricane Fran have delayed her ride home by more than six weeks. Lucid has been aboard Mir since March and has already shattered the record for the longest mission by a U.S.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | From Associated Press
Shannon Lucid, the astronaut who spent a record 188 days in space this year, became the first woman to be awarded the congressional Space Medal of Honor. President Clinton praised her Monday as a "determined visionary." In an Oval Office ceremony, Lucid said her history-making flight aboard the Russian space station Mir was a story of "two great space-faring nations" cooperating on a landmark mission and setting the stage for more joint exploration.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
American astronaut Shannon Lucid broke the U.S. spaceflight endurance record of 115 days, 9 hours, 43 minutes while aboard the Russian space station Mir, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Cape Canaveral, Fla., reported. The record was held by Norman Thagard, who last year became the first American to live and work aboard Mir. The world record for spaceflight, 439 days, is held by a Russian cosmonaut.
NEWS
September 26, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Astronaut Shannon Lucid is due to land at Cape Canaveral, Fla., this morning, with a forecast of good weather. If the weather takes a turn for the worse, however, Lucid will land at Edwards AFB, Calif. If the space shuttle Atlantis returns on time, Lucid will have circled the Earth 3,008 times. She is expected back 188 days after she rocketed away to the Russian space station Mir. The 53-year-old biochemist is the first American woman to live on Mir.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Atlantis arrived at Russia's Mir station Wednesday night to pick up astronaut Shannon Lucid, thrilled to be going home after a record-breaking six months in orbit. The shuttle docked with the station, its lights flashing like a beacon, about 240 miles above the Carpathian Mountains of Eastern Europe. Faces were pressed tight against the windows of both spacecraft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996
There's no place like home. Just ask Shannon Lucid. She's back from 188 days in space--an American record--and she's hankering for contact with her family, a shower and junk food. Such creature comforts were absent and dearly missed by the 53-year-old Oklahoman while she was aboard the Russian space station Mir.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
After 188 days in space, Shannon Lucid is going to be a little wobbly on her legs, lightheaded and very, very tired, researchers said Thursday. Experience from previous extended space missions suggests that it may take eight weeks for her to fully regain her balance, and longer still to restore the 20% loss of muscle mass that has been encountered on previous missions, according to Dr. Dan Feeback, who heads the Johnson Space Center's muscle research laboratory.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She's home at last. After a record-setting 188 days in space, Shannon Lucid--biochemist, pioneer astronaut and mother with a hankering for potato chips and chocolate--returned to planet Earth on Thursday aboard the space shuttle Atlantis. As the sun rose over the Atlantic Ocean, the silvery shuttle glided into view here, its arrival heralded by a double-barreled sonic boom. It rolled to a stop on the long runway at Kennedy Space Center at 8:13 a.m. EDT. "Welcome home," said Mission Control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996
There's no place like home. Just ask Shannon Lucid. She's back from 188 days in space--an American record--and she's hankering for contact with her family, a shower and junk food. Such creature comforts were absent and dearly missed by the 53-year-old Oklahoman while she was aboard the Russian space station Mir.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
After 188 days in space, Shannon Lucid is going to be a little wobbly on her legs, lightheaded and very, very tired, researchers said Thursday. Experience from previous extended space missions suggests that it may take eight weeks for her to fully regain her balance, and longer still to restore the 20% loss of muscle mass that has been encountered on previous missions, according to Dr. Dan Feeback, who heads the Johnson Space Center's muscle research laboratory.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She's home at last. After a record-setting 188 days in space, Shannon Lucid--biochemist, pioneer astronaut and mother with a hankering for potato chips and chocolate--returned to planet Earth on Thursday aboard the space shuttle Atlantis. As the sun rose over the Atlantic Ocean, the silvery shuttle glided into view here, its arrival heralded by a double-barreled sonic boom. It rolled to a stop on the long runway at Kennedy Space Center at 8:13 a.m. EDT. "Welcome home," said Mission Control.
NEWS
September 26, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Astronaut Shannon Lucid is due to land at Cape Canaveral, Fla., this morning, with a forecast of good weather. If the weather takes a turn for the worse, however, Lucid will land at Edwards AFB, Calif. If the space shuttle Atlantis returns on time, Lucid will have circled the Earth 3,008 times. She is expected back 188 days after she rocketed away to the Russian space station Mir. The 53-year-old biochemist is the first American woman to live on Mir.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Atlantis arrived at Russia's Mir station Wednesday night to pick up astronaut Shannon Lucid, thrilled to be going home after a record-breaking six months in orbit. The shuttle docked with the station, its lights flashing like a beacon, about 240 miles above the Carpathian Mountains of Eastern Europe. Faces were pressed tight against the windows of both spacecraft.
NEWS
September 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Relief is on the way for NASA astronaut Shannon Lucid. Space shuttle Atlantis blasted off Monday on a mission to bring Lucid home from the Russian space station Mir, where she has spent a record-breaking six months in orbit. Atlantis, more than six weeks late because of mechanical trouble and two hurricanes, is supposed to dock late Wednesday with Mir, despite the failure of a critical power unit that could force NASA to cut the flight short.
NEWS
March 24, 1996 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Atlantis linked with Russia's space station 245 miles above Earth on Saturday night, ferrying a NASA astronaut eager to begin her five-month stay and "great adventure." Atlantis slowly, gracefully moved in and docked with the Mir station as the spacecraft soared over Russia. "Houston, I have contact and capture," reported Atlantis' commander, Kevin Chilton. NASA's communication lines were quiet as Chilton guided Atlantis into Mir's docking port.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Since returning from a record-smashing six months in space, celebrity astronaut Shannon Lucid has been making the rounds. Not the talk-show rounds. Not yet, anyway. The bookstore rounds. One of the things Lucid missed most while living on the Russian space station Mir was browsing through bookstores, so she's making up for lost time. "We landed on a Thursday, didn't we?
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Astronaut Shannon Lucid's mission to the Russian Mir space station entered the record books as the longest spaceflight by a woman. It was a record Lucid was not expecting to break. Her tour of duty aboard the orbiting outpost was supposed to have ended in early August, but shuttle booster problems, scheduling conflicts and Hurricane Fran have delayed her ride home by more than six weeks. Lucid has been aboard Mir since March and has already shattered the record for the longest mission by a U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
American astronaut Shannon Lucid broke the U.S. spaceflight endurance record of 115 days, 9 hours, 43 minutes while aboard the Russian space station Mir, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Cape Canaveral, Fla., reported. The record was held by Norman Thagard, who last year became the first American to live and work aboard Mir. The world record for spaceflight, 439 days, is held by a Russian cosmonaut.
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