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Shannon Miller

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SPORTS
July 15, 1992 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gym about five miles north of Grandy's restaurant--where you can get all the livers and gizzards you can eat for $2.99--Shannon Miller is practicing. Her hair frizzed, her face sweaty, she steps to a door in a building the size of a bus depot and tries to catch a breeze. It's 90 degrees outside, 95 inside and the humidity is off the scale. It's nearly 8 o'clock on what for most others is a lazy summer night in June.
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SPORTS
August 16, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Shannon Miller, winner of a record seven Olympic gymnastics medals, will compete in the U.S. trials this week in Boston after showing in a mock meet that she has recovered from a hairline crack in her right leg. "I'm extremely excited for Shannon," said her longtime coach, Steve Nunno. "She has gone through a regular, grueling Olympic cycle these last nine months. The highs, the lows, the injuries." Two other gymnasts, Jeanette Antolin and Amanda Stroud, also were cleared.
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SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | BILL GLAUBER, BALTIMORE SUN
OK, so she's not Mary Lou Retton. She doesn't sparkle while tumbling. She doesn't smile on cue. She doesn't leap into the arms of a coach. All Shannon Miller does is pile up medals in the Summer Olympics. Saturday night, the 4-foot-9, 73-pound gymnast who wears heart-shaped diamond earrings and performs with a grimace on her face, won a silver and two bronzes in the women's individual apparatus.
SPORTS
July 28, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let the games begin. The petitioning games, that is. Shannon Miller, the most decorated female gymnast in U.S. history, came to the 2000 U.S. Gymnastics Championships Thursday night, stood in front of the balance beam, raised her arms toward the judges and walked away. Same thing when Miller got to the mat before her floor exercise routine and when she approached the vault. Miller accepted scores of 0.00, then competed on the uneven bars where she scored a 9.650.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Good Sports: American gymnast Shannon Miller, fresh from winning five medals at the Olympics, will be interviewed on "Live With Regis and Kathie Lee" Friday, her first national interview since returning from Barcelona. The program airs at 9 a.m. on ABC.
SPORTS
July 27, 1992 | BILL GLAUBER, BALTIMORE SUN
How's this for opening-night jitters? Kim Zmeskal, the reigning all-around world champion, fell on the balance beam and might have fallen out of the gold rush in gymnastics. Zmeskal, whose steely nerves and power launched her to the top of the gymnastics ladder, took a tumble from the top during Sunday night's women's team compulsories at the Summer Olympics. After a flurry of magazine cover stories, television features and pre-Olympic predictions, Zmeskal finally had the chance to stand alone.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | MIKE PENNER
Belu, on the tumbling, stumbling American women: "The best position was for Dominique Dawes. If she did not fall on floor, for sure she would have been on the [medals] podium. She made a good beam, a good bars, but a big mistake on floor. She make a good vault, but it was too late. "Shannon Miller is very good team competitor, but it was very hard for her to compete today. "But for me, what's important is Dominique Dawes and Shannon Miller are both 19, the same generation as Lavinia.
SPORTS
April 21, 1994 | From Associated Press
Shannon Miller, defending world champion in the all-around, rebounded from a disappointing opening day during Wednesday's World Gymnastics Championships. Miller, 17, from Edmond, Okla., qualified second behind teammate Dominique Dawes in the beam event and third behind Romania's Lavinia Milosovici and Dawes in the floor exercises. It was an improvement after Tuesday, when she was fourth in qualifying for the vault and missed out on a place in the final of the uneven bars. Steve Nunno, U.S.
SPORTS
June 19, 1996 | Associated Press
Injured gymnasts Shannon Miller and Dominique Moceanu will be allowed to try to make the Olympic team without competing at next week's trials, USA Gymnastics ruled Tuesday. Miller and Moceanu, winners of the last two national titles, each petitioned to skip the trials because of physical problems made worse by competing at the nationals. Miller, 19, has an ongoing problem with her left wrist. Moceanu, 14, has a four-inch stress fracture in her right leg.
SPORTS
July 31, 1992 | BILL GLAUBER, BALTIMORE SUN
They were leading Shannon Miller around the arena. There were photographers blocking her path and a silver medal dangling from her neck, and the crowd started to call her name. She was off to drug-testing and another interview and maybe even a brief visit with her parents, who had flown from Edmond, Okla., to be with her on a night that was nearly perfect. You couldn't wipe that smile from her face.
SPORTS
May 14, 2000 | NANCY ARMOUR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the frenzy of the Atlanta Games finally subsided, Shannon Miller needed a break. She had spent most of her life in a gym, working and pushing her body beyond exhaustion, but wanted to know what else was out there besides gymnastics. So she learned how to figure skate. She went scuba diving. She tried skydiving. She went to college. She even got married. "I had a blast," said Miller, the most-decorated American gymnast ever, with seven Olympic medals and nine from the world championships.
SPORTS
April 12, 2000 | MIKE PENNER
It is obvious now, six months after the fact, that the U.S. women's gymnastics program learned a hard lesson at the 1999 World Championships, where Team USA finished a desultory sixth place: If you can't beat 'em with what you've got, start dragging bodies out of retirement. First came Bela Karolyi, setting aside the elephant gun and hunter's camouflage to return to the fray in the newly created position of "national team coordinator."
SPORTS
February 15, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
A couple of ugly incidents occurred after the women's hockey game between the U.S. and Canada, potentially intensifying their battle Tuesday for the gold medal. After a 7-4 U.S. victory and a postgame handshake, Canada's coach, Shannon Miller, charged that an American player made an improper comment on the ice about Canadian opponent Danielle Goyette's father, who died just before the Olympics. "When something is said about her father, that is uncalled for," Miller told a Canadian TV reporter.
SPORTS
February 9, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Danielle Goyette's three goals in Canada's 13-0 rout of Japan on Sunday had special emotional significance. She accomplished it only three days after her father, Henri-Paul, died of Alzheimer's disease at 77. She decided to stay in Nagano instead of returning home to Quebec. "My father was very proud of me, and I will do my best to honor him," she said. "Life's trials often make us better, stronger. Unfortunately we don't choose when these trials will occur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid much pomp and little circumstance, Rose Parade officials Wednesday announced that Olympic gold medalists Carl Lewis and Shannon Miller will host the 1997 procession. When track star Lewis and gymnast Miller stepped forward from behind a curtain to address a small crowd at the Tournament of Roses headquarters in Pasadena, one spectator whispered disappointedly, "Oh, I thought she would at least do a couple of cartwheels."
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the falls, after the broken vaults and the off-the-floor exercise, Shannon Miller awakened Monday morning not liking the impression she was leaving on these Olympics. Nationally televised breakdowns, anguish in Atlanta, '96 tears--this was no way to go about calling it an international gymnastics career. She had failed to win the all-around gold medal that obsessed her after settling for silver in Barcelona--and didn't come close, finishing eighth.
SPORTS
July 31, 1992 | From Associated Press
A little trickery, a bit of controversy, a costly slip and, presto, the same old thing: a CIS victory and American loss in gymnastics. Tatiana Gutsu, inserted into the Commonwealth of Independent States starting lineup through a bit of roster sleight of hand, captured the sport's most coveted medal Thursday night, the women's all-around, with a steady stream of high scores. Shannon Miller, 15, took the silver medal, although her coach said she was robbed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid much pomp and little circumstance, Rose Parade officials Wednesday announced that Olympic gold medalists Carl Lewis and Shannon Miller will host the 1997 procession. When track star Lewis and gymnast Miller stepped forward from behind a curtain to address a small crowd at the Tournament of Roses headquarters in Pasadena, one spectator whispered disappointedly, "Oh, I thought she would at least do a couple of cartwheels."
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | MIKE PENNER
Belu, on the tumbling, stumbling American women: "The best position was for Dominique Dawes. If she did not fall on floor, for sure she would have been on the [medals] podium. She made a good beam, a good bars, but a big mistake on floor. She make a good vault, but it was too late. "Shannon Miller is very good team competitor, but it was very hard for her to compete today. "But for me, what's important is Dominique Dawes and Shannon Miller are both 19, the same generation as Lavinia.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She wasn't theatrically carried to the victory stand in the arms of her coach, and she doesn't invite magazine photographers into her bedroom at home so that they may shoot her playing with her stuffed-animal collection. In fact, Shannon Miller would avoid the bright light of fame altogether if it didn't come automatically attached to the 9.95 balance beam scores that so obsess her.
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