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Shara Nelson

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August 7, 1994 | Ernest Hardy, Ernest Hardy is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles
English R&B newcomer Shara Nelson is being called the heiress to both France's Little Sparrow, Edith Piaf, and America's Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin. Not bad for someone whose first album has been in U.S. stores for only a month. Though Nelson, 30, doesn't really sound like a Memorex copy of either musical icon, their emotional essence reverberates strongly in her lyrics and voice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Ernest Hardy, Ernest Hardy is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles
English R&B newcomer Shara Nelson is being called the heiress to both France's Little Sparrow, Edith Piaf, and America's Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin. Not bad for someone whose first album has been in U.S. stores for only a month. Though Nelson, 30, doesn't really sound like a Memorex copy of either musical icon, their emotional essence reverberates strongly in her lyrics and voice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Dennis Hunt
***; SHARA NELSON, "What Silence Knows" ( Chrysalis/ERG ) A trademark of the Pet Shop Boys is singing melancholy lyrics to perky dance beats, and they did it better than anyone until Nelson came along with this impressive debut solo album. The bouncy tempos add a strange tension to such songs as "Pain Revisited" and "One Goodbye in Ten," which tell depressing tales of broken relationships. Her ballads, including "Inside Out" and "What Silence Knows," are particularly gloomy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1999
In between film and TV gigs, LL Cool J has been busy in a New York studio working on his next album, now scheduled for a March release. He's also featured on a new remix of Montell Jordan's "Get It On Tonight." . . . The Beastie Boys and Moby are trading remixes, with the rap trio set to mess around with a track (still undetermined) from Moby's acclaimed "Play" album and the techno philosopher reworking the Beasties' new single, "Alive."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1994 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
A new Al Green? A new George Jones? A new Neil Young? There are lots of traces of old pop greatness in this edition of the guide--a way to keep up with what's exciting in pop on a budget of $50 a month. Shara Nelson reminds you of Green at his peak. David Ball reminds you of Jones at his peak. And who reminds you of Young at his peak? Why Young himself, of course. July Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, "Let Love In," Mute/Elektra.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1998 | ERNESTO LECHNER
Watching Massive Attack perform its first real Los Angeles concert on Sunday at the Hollywood Palladium was a demystifying experience, with both the joys and the disappointments that come with it. The sound collective from Bristol, England, has been in town before, but at its previous appearances you felt as if you were standing in a huge, futuristic living room listening to records rather than enjoying the electrifying mystique of a live show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1994 | Richard Cromelin
Defying the common wisdom that her career was all but over after the suicide of her husband, Kurt Cobain, Courtney Love and her band Hole have taken top honors in The Times' pop contributors' annual balloting for best album. Hole's "Live Through This," recorded before Cobain's death, tops a field that ranges from veterans (R.E.M., Neil Young) to emerging forces (Soundgarden) to rookies (Warren G)--not to mention the oldest artist to appear in the poll's 15-year history: Johnny Cash, 62.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1995 | Ernest Hardy, Ernest Hardy is a frequent contributor to Calendar
'Do you have any ideas on how we can actually sell this record in America?" All three members of England's critically acclaimed reggae/hip-hop/dance-music group Massive Attack slide to the edges of their seats in the Beverly Hills offices of Virgin Records and wait for an answer to the question posed by 3-D, the group's self-dubbed "white boy." When no reply is forthcoming, 3-D leans back in his chair and laughs. "That's OK," he says, waving a cigarette.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1994 | Gil Griffin, Gil Griffin is a free-lance writer based in Washington, D.C
It is late on a weeknight, and silence prevails in the dimly lit, fifth-floor hallway of the Hit Factory--the renowned, midtown Manhattan recording studio. Until the door to Studio A3 opens. Inside, a tall, slender young man with a round crew cut and a matching 5 o'clock shadow stands in near-darkness behind a glass panel, grinning while he playfully babbles into an overhead microphone.
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