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Shara Worden

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August 20, 2006 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
IT'S hard to characterize other indie rock vocalists as singers after listening to My Brightest Diamond. The delicate vocals are delivered with such immense style and passion, such doting care and control that they make many of today's top artists sound like novices. The sheen on My Brightest Diamond is the handiwork of Shara Worden, a New York City musician who is, by training, an opera singer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2006 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
IT'S hard to characterize other indie rock vocalists as singers after listening to My Brightest Diamond. The delicate vocals are delivered with such immense style and passion, such doting care and control that they make many of today's top artists sound like novices. The sheen on My Brightest Diamond is the handiwork of Shara Worden, a New York City musician who is, by training, an opera singer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
The Blind Boys of Alabama, known in various formations since the late 1930s for their harmony-rich gospel music, are courting a new audience: indie-rock millennials. On Thursday the group announced details of its upcoming collaboration with Justin Vernon of the hipster-beloved Bon Iver, who broke out in 2008 with "For Emma, Forever Ago," a set of cloistered folk songs he said he'd written and recorded while camped out by himself in a cabin in the Wisconsin woods. Last year Bon Iver won the Grammy Award for best new artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2009 | ANN POWERS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
A barbecue joint in the heart of Austin's party district may not seem like the best place for a composer and his ensemble to debut a serious new work. But Oregon's the Decemberists, the collaborative that realizes Colin Meloy's conceptions, are a rock band too. So just after midnight Thursday, the group took the stage at Stubb's and presented "The Hazards of Love," its new "folk opera," for the first time in concert. The show celebrated the release of the "Hazards" album (out now on iTunes, due Tuesday on CD and vinyl)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2009 | Alie Ward
Colin Meloy, frontman for the popular alt-rock band the Decemberists, feels pretty good when he hears his latest album referred to as a "rock opera." "I embrace it," he says with a sigh of surrender. "I was calling it 'a play for voices,' but whatever. Certainly 'rock opera' is an easy tag." Meloy originally conceived "The Hazards of Love" as a musical, and its 17 tracks stitch together a narrative thick with murder, vengeance and ill-fated love. The lyrics are heavy with shadowy forest imagery and lay out a drama involving a shape-shifting half-man/half-fawn that falls for a girl named Margaret, only to be driven from her by a vindictive forest queen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Minimalism, the musical version, has always been a numbers game. It began with extended tones, with beats added and subtracted to phrases at will and with simple rhythms played in and out of phase to create complex patterns. So let's have some numbers for the Los Angeles Philharmonic's extraordinary Green Umbrella marathon Tuesday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall, part of the orchestra's Minimalist Jukebox Festival. The concert lasted five hours if you count a pre-concert discussion and a pre-concert performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2010 | By ANN POWERS, Pop Music Critic
"I like this . . . rococo," said Abe Vigoda guitarist Michael Vidal from the stage of the Tennessee Theatre, an ornately gilded movie palace turned concert hall, during his band's Saturday set at the Big Ears festival in Knoxville, Tenn., which ran Friday through Sunday. Vidal had paused a beat to find the word; hitting on it, he put a perfect descriptive on a gathering virtually unlike any other in the busy pop-festival season. Big Ears, now in its second year, is the love child of Bonnaroo co-founder Ashley Capps, who started his career in this mid-size Southern city booking concerts at the University of Tennessee.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The BBC Concert Orchestra could easily be mistaken on its current California tour for being not just British but the embodiment of Ye Olde England in some of its former glory. The foundation for its program at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa Tuesday night (to be repeated Thursday at in Northridge and Friday in San Diego) was Edward Elgar at his most familiar - the popular "Enigma Variations" and the sun-setting-on-the-empire Cello Concerto. More nostalgia for times gone by came with a little piece by George Butterworth, written shortly before he died in battle in the First World War. Benjamin Britten's "Four Sea Interludes" from "Peter Grimes," which opened the program, has a slightly later, though also long-gone, British Isles written all over it. If there was spanner in the works, it was that Keith Lockhart, music director of the orchestra since 2010, is not only an American but the longtime music director of the Boston Pops, no less.
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