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NEWS
September 5, 1987 | From United Press International
Knudsen Corp. announced a recall Friday of some shipments of cottage cheese sold in California and Nevada that may contain shards of glass. The recall, called "precautionary" by the dairy, involves six shipments of several varieties of Knudsen and Foremost brands cottage cheese made at Knudsen's plant in Visalia. The cause of the contamination was under investigation. Consumers can return the cottage cheese to the market where it was purchased for a full refund, Knudsen said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Marcia Adair
LONDON -- Look up.  Waaaay up.  Well, not quite that far. This isn't New York, after all. The Shard, England's newest and tallest skyscraper stands alone on the south bank of the Thames here, between the government lawyers and CEOs to the north and Canary Wharf bankers to the east. Immediately next door lies the two-story London Bridge station. The building, designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano is a pyramid with sides that don't meet at the top, a shape inspired by London's many church spires and the masts of the ships that used to crowd the Thames.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By Robert Abele
When someone survives as many attempted hits as Cleveland-based Irish mobster Danny Greene did in the '70s, one might expect the inevitable movie bio treatment to be thrilling, crazy, even bleakly funny. But "Kill the Irishman," starring Ray Stevenson as self-professed Celtic warrior Greene, plays instead like an explosion's aftermath: clichéd shards of mob movies that add up to the usual "Goodfellas" knockoff. Director Jonathan Hensleigh (co-writing with Jeremy Walters) certainly charges through Greene's life ?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011 | By Aaron Wiener, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Atop a hill overlooking a city still rebuilding after its near-destruction more than 65 years ago stands a once-staid former armory now slashed in half by a giant shard of glass and steel. The Museum of Military History in Dresden, redesigned by the American architect Daniel Libeskind and set to open to the public Saturday, is the first war museum to open in Germany since the country's reunification and a study in contrasts appropriate to a nation grappling with its violent past.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1987 | DONALD J. HUTERA, Hutera is a free-lance arts writer who divides his time between the United States and Europe. and
Merce Cunningham's interest in stripping dance down to its essentials--bodies moving through space and time--enables his choreography to simultaneously appeal on abstract and human levels. At 68, he adheres to the belief that "movement is expressive by and of itself. You have to find a way to do it fully, whether it's a simple or complex movement. "By simple I don't mean simple-minded. Say you're only moving your hand: to make that seem as large as a large leap.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | JONATHAN GOLD
BABES IN TOYLAND "Fontanelle" Warner Bros . * * * 1/2 If the revolution won't be televised, at least it's available now on CD and cassette, half an hour of purest female anger, an articulate howl of rage that's just as shocking the 10th time you listen to it as it is the first. This may be the rawest performance ever released by a major label, and also one of the most necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | Charles McNulty; Charlotte Stoudt; F. Kathleen Foley; David C. Nichols
The word "utopia," that imaginary site of perfection, comes from the Greek, meaning "not a place." And it's this essential irony that playwright Phyllis Nagy hopes to catch in "Never Land," her tedious poetic ramble in which psychologically fragmented characters long to find a better elsewhere. Let's peek in on the crazy, financially strapped Joubert family in its misleadingly grand home in the South of France (tastefully appointed by scenic designer Frederica Nascimento). Grown daughter Elisabeth (Katherine Tozer)
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | JULIE CART and ERIC SLATER and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Laughing as they killed, two youths clad in dark ski masks and long black coats fired handguns at will and blithely tossed pipe bombs into a crowd of their terrified classmates Tuesday inside a suburban high school southwest of Denver, littering halls with as many as 23 bodies and wounding at least 25 others.
NEWS
October 10, 1991
The colors in the largest jug are those of the sky just after the sun drops behind the mountain--lavender, purple, beige, cream, pink and mauve. The jug is two feet high and 18 inches in diameter. There are a few chinks where pieces are missing. The amateur archeologist who has reconstructed this beautiful piece of pottery is Tom Kennedy, a handsome, long-boned man with the kind of even tan that comes from living and working in the desert, not from stretching out beside a pool.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Quaker Oats Co.'s Gatorade unit is recalling some 16-ounce bottles of its Gatorade Thirst Quencher after consumers complained of finding glass fragments. The company said the cause of the problem has been identified and corrected. There have been no reports of serious injury, California State Health Director Kim Belshe said. Gatorade has advised brokers, warehouses, distributors and retailers to retrieve the recalled products as soon as possible, Belshe said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By Robert Abele
When someone survives as many attempted hits as Cleveland-based Irish mobster Danny Greene did in the '70s, one might expect the inevitable movie bio treatment to be thrilling, crazy, even bleakly funny. But "Kill the Irishman," starring Ray Stevenson as self-professed Celtic warrior Greene, plays instead like an explosion's aftermath: clichéd shards of mob movies that add up to the usual "Goodfellas" knockoff. Director Jonathan Hensleigh (co-writing with Jeremy Walters) certainly charges through Greene's life ?
HOME & GARDEN
November 28, 2009 | By Ariel Swartley
Wrapped in white paper, the pile of glass used to be an amber-tinted globe -- a shade, one of many, for a chandelier. It now lies in more than 40 pieces on the counter at Brookes Restorations. A few of the shards can be measured in inches; most are slivers. Because the chandelier is an antique, replacement isn't an option, Geoff Brookes says, his British Midlands accent still evident despite three decades in Los Angeles. But can the globe be repaired? Hopeless is a word rarely heard in this shop -- even when a groom wants the goblet he crushed under his heel at the wedding made whole again.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | Charles McNulty; Charlotte Stoudt; F. Kathleen Foley; David C. Nichols
The word "utopia," that imaginary site of perfection, comes from the Greek, meaning "not a place." And it's this essential irony that playwright Phyllis Nagy hopes to catch in "Never Land," her tedious poetic ramble in which psychologically fragmented characters long to find a better elsewhere. Let's peek in on the crazy, financially strapped Joubert family in its misleadingly grand home in the South of France (tastefully appointed by scenic designer Frederica Nascimento). Grown daughter Elisabeth (Katherine Tozer)
SCIENCE
June 6, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Chinese and Israeli archaeologists have discovered the oldest known pottery, remains of an 18,000-year-old cone-shaped vase excavated from a cave in southern China. The shards are about 1,000 years older than the previous record-holder, found in Japan. After flint tools, pottery is one of the oldest human-made materials, and tracing its development provides insight into the evolution of culture.
WORLD
October 24, 2006 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
There were no fireworks or feasts this year. Instead, it was the funeral of a child that ushered out the holy month of Ramadan in this tiny village of olive farmers. Ashraf Shibli was 11 years old, and his family remembers him as a clever and curious boy. On Sunday afternoon, he set off a cluster bomb while foraging for pine cones in a sun-dappled grove. The first thing the villagers heard, echoing over the hills, was the explosion.
NEWS
May 4, 2006 | Brenda Rees, Special to The Times
THOMAS WAKE is busy preparing his lab for Saturday's archeology open house at UCLA -- he's considering displaying a 1,000-year-old howler monkey skull from Panama, shells from long-ago oceans and ancient spearheads fashioned out of panther bones. Just for fun, he may drag out a 1,800-year-old piece of giant sloth dung, followed up by balls of dried owl vomit. "Kids really enjoy seeing that," Wake says with a chuckle. "And there's so much to learn by examining specimens like this.
NEWS
July 19, 1988 | Associated Press
A popular beach on Martha's Vineyard has been closed indefinitely because relics from World War II target practice have been turning up in the sand. Officials said bathers could injure themselves by stepping on rusted scraps of metal that are resurfacing as South Beach erodes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Marcia Adair
LONDON -- Look up.  Waaaay up.  Well, not quite that far. This isn't New York, after all. The Shard, England's newest and tallest skyscraper stands alone on the south bank of the Thames here, between the government lawyers and CEOs to the north and Canary Wharf bankers to the east. Immediately next door lies the two-story London Bridge station. The building, designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano is a pyramid with sides that don't meet at the top, a shape inspired by London's many church spires and the masts of the ships that used to crowd the Thames.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
When Cate Blanchett's Hedda Gabler saunters disdainfully through the new home that her husband's aunt has taken great financial risks to elaborately furnish, it's hard not to feel worried about the old lady's investment. Nothing could possibly live up to this Hedda's stylish example -- or be safe around it. One has only to hear her deliver the compliment "lovely" as though it were the word "loathsome" to know that her porcelain-like prettiness is deadly.
SCIENCE
August 2, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Analysis of 3,000-year-old pottery shards from the ancient Olmec capital of San Lorenzo and other sites contradicts the notion among some researchers that the Olmec civilization was the "mother culture" that laid the foundation for the Inca, Maya and other civilizations of Central and South America. Many researchers believe that the Olmec were the primary culture of the region, dominating, inspiring and ultimately raising the other chiefdoms to the level of civilization.
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