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BUSINESS
December 1, 2009 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
Just a few months ago, the cooking school business was deflating like a punctured souffle. But at several culinary academies around Los Angeles, enrollment has taken a turn for the better. Spurred by out-of-work cooking enthusiasts seeking training for food industry jobs and by foodies brushing up on their skills so they can eat well without paying restaurant prices, sales are starting to recover -- even bouncing to pre-recession levels. "People are taking advantage of the economic downturn and looking to change careers," said Eric Crowley, who with his wife, Jennie Shields Crowley, owns Chef Eric's Culinary Classroom in Los Angeles.
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FOOD
August 10, 2005 | Leslee Komaiko
SPECIAL nights aren't so special now that they're happening every night of the week at one restaurant or another. Some places are even doing multiple special nights. How unspecial is that? Others seem to flirt with and abandon special nights as often as a commitment-phobe changes dance partners (would that be, um, sequential specialness?).
FOOD
January 28, 1993 | RUTH REICHL, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
As charity dinners go, Taste of the NFL might be the most incongruous. Think about it. What the title brings to mind is hot dogs and beer, not Champagne and smoked scallops with coconut cream curry. And nobody expects to find gridiron greats standing over greased griddles--no matter how famous the chef standing next to them may be. But hunger relief makes strange kitchenfellows.
MAGAZINE
June 12, 1988 | RUTH REICHL, Ruth Reichl is The Times' restaurant editor.
HE WENT TO work at age 13, in a restaurant 50 miles from his home in southern Austria. As his father waved goodby at the railroad station, he said, "You're good for nothing, and you'll never amount to any thing." Two weeks later the young man made a mistake in the kitchen--he doesn't recall what--and the chef told him to go back home. "I went down to the basement and peeled potatoes for two weeks, hoping that nobody would notice that I was still there. And I thought, my father was right."
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