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Shareen Mitchell

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April 17, 2011 | Steffie Nelson
Anyone who has set foot in Shareen Vintage, a vast downtown warehouse space lined with endless racks of sparkly cocktail frocks, gauzy hippie robes and an eclectic mix of other garments, will hardly be surprised to learn that the shop's owner, Shareen Mitchell, is starring in a new reality show, "Dresscue Me," premiering Tuesday on Discovery's Planet Green channel. Tall and blond with sculpted cheekbones and an imperious bearing that reflects her Seven Sisters education and thespian training, Mitchell also has a seventh sense for fashion.
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April 17, 2011 | Steffie Nelson
Anyone who has set foot in Shareen Vintage, a vast downtown warehouse space lined with endless racks of sparkly cocktail frocks, gauzy hippie robes and an eclectic mix of other garments, will hardly be surprised to learn that the shop's owner, Shareen Mitchell, is starring in a new reality show, "Dresscue Me," premiering Tuesday on Discovery's Planet Green channel. Tall and blond with sculpted cheekbones and an imperious bearing that reflects her Seven Sisters education and thespian training, Mitchell also has a seventh sense for fashion.
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June 17, 2007 | Elizabeth Khuri, Times Staff Writer
"I'M sorry I can't sell that to you," Shareen Mitchell says to a customer squeezed into a tight black dress that bunches at the neck. "The size is all wrong." "That needs a slip," she says to another, who models a sheer 1950s shirtdress. Then she grabs a black one and matches it with the navy dress. "That looks very chic, don't you think?"
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June 17, 2007 | Elizabeth Khuri, Times Staff Writer
"I'M sorry I can't sell that to you," Shareen Mitchell says to a customer squeezed into a tight black dress that bunches at the neck. "The size is all wrong." "That needs a slip," she says to another, who models a sheer 1950s shirtdress. Then she grabs a black one and matches it with the navy dress. "That looks very chic, don't you think?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Don't expect a dogfight of the four-legged kind in John Patrick Shanley's sendup of the movie industry, "Four Dogs and a Bone," at the Tamarind Theatre. Instead, there's a lot of cattiness as a middle-aged producer, a playwright-turned-screenwriter and two actresses calculate and maneuver to reshape a script in this well-acted, viciously funny production.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1997 | JANA J. MONJI
In Annie Reiner's comedy, "Mirage a Trois," the meta-theatrical conceit wears thin by the end, but this Santa Monica Playhouse production is so fluidly directed by Chris DeCarlo and well acted by a talented ensemble that getting there is entertaining enough. Reiner constructs a double menage a trois that crosses from reality into the world of imagination and desires.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI
Susan Rubin's "Mysteries in a Silver Box," an Indecent Exposure Theatre Company production at Los Angeles Theatre Center's Theatre 4, tries hard to subvert the English drawing-room mystery genre with a comic flair, but it's mostly a flaccid piece that fails to engage or excite.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1997 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first pairing in Actor's Workout Studio's one-act festival confirms that some writers are stuck in the '60s, while others have joined the rest of us in the '90s. Or, put another way, Dan W.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Amy Resnick plays Lili, a delightful post-feminist lesbian, in Claire Chafee's "Why We Have a Body" at the Tiffany Theater. Lili was inspired to become a private investigator as a girl, after encountering her first lesbian in literature: Harriet the Spy. How Lili knew Harriet was gay, I don't know. But I accept her confident judgment on this and all matters: In Resnick's hands, Lili is just what you hoped Harriet would grow up to be: smart, observant, dry, witty, pithy, a good listener.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tennessee Williams called them his "blue devils"--bouts of anxiety or depression that could make him nearly suicidal. They shattered his life but fueled his art. Such behind-the-scenes drama continues to fascinate theatergoers almost as much as Williams' plays do, as evidenced by a couple of long-running shows that recently announced extensions.
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August 10, 2008 | Emili Vesilind and Erin Weinger, Times Staff Writers
It might just be the best deal in town: Grab chic new trousers at Goodwill prices while supporting L.A.'s next generation of fashion talent at the $5 Jeans/Pants Party, happening at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising's Scholarship Store. The event runs until everything -- more than 700 pairs of pants and jeans, all priced at $5 -- sells out.
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May 15, 2011 | By Melissa Magsaysay, , Los Angeles Times
In December 2004, TV viewers started to tune in to a reality show that documented the dramatic details of producing a runway collection, and with it came a familiarity with infectious little catchphrases such as "make it work, people" and " auf Wiedersehen . " "Project Runway" lifted a curtain on the fashion industry, bringing usually behind-the-scenes individuals — magazine editors, stylists and designers — to millions of homes. It offered competition, drama, lively characters and eye candy in the form of sometimes gorgeous clothes as well as the models who wear them.
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