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Sharen Heath

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1990
This year, finally, they gave us one hell of a show! The 62nd Academy Awards were intelligent, respectable, entertaining. With glasnost , perestroika , increased environmental awareness the world over and integrity in Hollywood, you know what? I'm beginning to think Earth's not in such bad shape after all. SHAREN HEATH Laguna Beach
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1990
A great, green bravo to Tammerlin Drummond for a thorough article that revealed the extent to which Southern California canyons have become battlegrounds between environmentalists and developers ("Battle Cry Echoes in Canyons," June 23). Shopping malls and tract house developments along with their freeways (and now proposed toll roads) have concrete-ized the flatlands and polluted our air and water. Now they are threatening the region's last pristine frontiers--our wet and green canyons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1989
Green! Green! Green! Boy, do I love Southern California when it's green! I looked up at our downtown hills and they're green! Driving out Laguna Canyon Road: Green! Village parks and lush neighborhood gardens: All green! The recent rains may cause havoc on our highways, but the riot of green they add to open space is a remarkable, beautiful sight. I more fully appreciate the word greenbelt, and I'm delighted to read that Laguna Greenbelt Inc. is the recipient of the 1989 David Gaines Award for "sustained and effective action in defense of the environment," awarded by California's oldest environmental lobbying group, the Planning and Conservation League.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1990
This year, finally, they gave us one hell of a show! The 62nd Academy Awards were intelligent, respectable, entertaining. With glasnost , perestroika , increased environmental awareness the world over and integrity in Hollywood, you know what? I'm beginning to think Earth's not in such bad shape after all. SHAREN HEATH Laguna Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1989
The residents of 890 acres in Laguna Canyon and the city of Laguna Beach have cooperatively agreed upon the desire for official connection through annexation. The only stumbling block is the Local Agency Formation Commission's sudden condition with respect to imposing, as a term of annexation approval, a requirement by the city to collect transportation corridor fees. Laguna Beach has long been on record as opposing the San Joaquin Hills Tollway Corridor. To require this condition asks residents to compromise their principles in a most serious way. The condition is thoroughly unreasonable and unethical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1990
A great, green bravo to Tammerlin Drummond for a thorough article that revealed the extent to which Southern California canyons have become battlegrounds between environmentalists and developers ("Battle Cry Echoes in Canyons," June 23). Shopping malls and tract house developments along with their freeways (and now proposed toll roads) have concrete-ized the flatlands and polluted our air and water. Now they are threatening the region's last pristine frontiers--our wet and green canyons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1988
Several years ago I bought a tape deck. The manufacturer must have employed a poetic writer, for its instructions described the nature of non-sound as it relates to the music machine's performance with the sentence, "Silence is an important part of music." "Yes," I thought, "silence is an important part of life." It may be a feeble analogy, but the idea that nothingness has value relates, I think, to the Laguna Canyon issue. Caltrans wants to cut a wider slice--i.e., a many-laned modern highway--through the pastoral canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1988
On Dec. 14, the County of Orange, through its Environmental Management Agency, conducted a public meeting with regard to scoping the environmental impacts of the Irvine Co.'s proposed Laguna Laurel project and Caltrans' proposal to widen Laguna Canyon Road between El Toro Road and Interstate 405. This is a very important process. The fate of Laguna Canyon rests with public interest and input. We are invited to submit questions and comments to the agency by Jan. 5 by writing to Bob Rusby, Environmental Agency of Orange County, P.O. Box 4048, Santa Ana, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1989
I'm not amused by the recent 25% pay raise, and recommendation to fix subsequent raises to judicial pay scales, unanimously adopted by the Orange County Board of Supervisors. Like many, many taxpayers, I find the pay hikes totally out of line considering the pernicious financial condition Orange County is experiencing. Moreover, given what I consider to be less than exemplary performances by board members, I find the pay increase extraordinarily insulting. Supervisor Stanton, defending the hike for alleged lack of opposition, was quoted in The Times: "When there are 2.3 million people in the county, the percentage (of complaints about the pay hike)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1989
Sharen Heath opposes Measure M (Oct. 22) because it uses a sales tax to raise revenue instead of a gas tax. I agree that we should be paying for streets, roads and highways with an increase in the gas tax. But does she realize that it would take about a 50-cent increase, (up from the present 9 cents per gallon), to raise the same amount of money as a half-cent sales tax increase? I think anyone would recognize that a 50-cent increase in the gas tax for Orange County alone would place an intolerable burden on our retailers of gasoline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1989
The residents of 890 acres in Laguna Canyon and the city of Laguna Beach have cooperatively agreed upon the desire for official connection through annexation. The only stumbling block is the Local Agency Formation Commission's sudden condition with respect to imposing, as a term of annexation approval, a requirement by the city to collect transportation corridor fees. Laguna Beach has long been on record as opposing the San Joaquin Hills Tollway Corridor. To require this condition asks residents to compromise their principles in a most serious way. The condition is thoroughly unreasonable and unethical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1989
Green! Green! Green! Boy, do I love Southern California when it's green! I looked up at our downtown hills and they're green! Driving out Laguna Canyon Road: Green! Village parks and lush neighborhood gardens: All green! The recent rains may cause havoc on our highways, but the riot of green they add to open space is a remarkable, beautiful sight. I more fully appreciate the word greenbelt, and I'm delighted to read that Laguna Greenbelt Inc. is the recipient of the 1989 David Gaines Award for "sustained and effective action in defense of the environment," awarded by California's oldest environmental lobbying group, the Planning and Conservation League.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1988
On Dec. 14, the County of Orange, through its Environmental Management Agency, conducted a public meeting with regard to scoping the environmental impacts of the Irvine Co.'s proposed Laguna Laurel project and Caltrans' proposal to widen Laguna Canyon Road between El Toro Road and Interstate 405. This is a very important process. The fate of Laguna Canyon rests with public interest and input. We are invited to submit questions and comments to the agency by Jan. 5 by writing to Bob Rusby, Environmental Agency of Orange County, P.O. Box 4048, Santa Ana, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1988
Several years ago I bought a tape deck. The manufacturer must have employed a poetic writer, for its instructions described the nature of non-sound as it relates to the music machine's performance with the sentence, "Silence is an important part of music." "Yes," I thought, "silence is an important part of life." It may be a feeble analogy, but the idea that nothingness has value relates, I think, to the Laguna Canyon issue. Caltrans wants to cut a wider slice--i.e., a many-laned modern highway--through the pastoral canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1988
I am disappointed with recent remarks made by Supervisor Thomas F. Riley regarding again seeking state Coastal Commission approval on widening California 133, Laguna Canyon Road. The state Department of Transportation had the right to appeal February's commission decision, which overruled the road's widening but did not within the 30-day appeal limit. In fact, subsequent to the finding, and as a result of the commission's recognition of sensible safety improvements outlined and urged by the Laguna Canyon Conservancy, city officials and members of the conservancy met with Keith McKean, Caltrans' district director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1988
Re: County's Appeal Fees Are Too High, Unfair (Oct. 23). I agree with the editorial rebuking county supervisors for increasing public appeal fees to a whopping $1,700. I'm sick of the arrogant behavior frequently demonstrated toward the rights of ordinary citizens by these elected officials. This past summer, Supervisor Thomas F. Riley was the recipient of a birthday party bash and the celebrated subject of full-page, color ads in local newspapers bought with tens of thousands of developer dollars.
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