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Sharia

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WORLD
April 30, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In Afghanistan, Iraq and many other countries across the globe, most Muslims support making sharia , or Islamic law, the official law of the land, according to a sweeping survey released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. But sharia means different things to different Muslims, according to the study. Some supporters believe it should apply only to Muslims. Some want it used in only some kinds of cases. And many Muslims disagree on the morality of divorce, polygamy and birth control.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 10, 2013 | By Ty McCormick
To the extent that the Obama administration has responded to the ouster of Mohamed Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president, it has largely accepted the shake-up as a necessary, if not fully legitimate, response to the bumbling incompetence and growing authoritarianism of his government. President Obama is "deeply concerned" by the military's decision to remove Morsi, but he has not described it as a "coup" - a designation that might have imperiled the $1.3 billion in U.S. aid Egypt receives annually - or called for Morsi's reinstatement.
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OPINION
May 16, 2011
A federal appeals court will soon consider a challenge to an Oklahoma measure prohibiting the use of Sharia, or Islamic law, in the state's courts. The constitutional amendment is part of a national trend in which politicians — including Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich — argue that it is vital to prevent Sharia from insinuating itself into the administration of justice in U.S. courts. Never mind that there is scant evidence that American judges are resolving cases on the basis of Sharia.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Michael McGough
In the post-9/11 culture wars over Islamic fundamentalism, American conservatives - properly - have condemned attempts in Muslim countries to punish blasphemy or insults to the prophet Muhammad. It will be interesting to see if they are similarly outraged over what has happened to an art student at Carnegie Mellon University who insulted the pope. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that CMU filed criminal charges against Katherine B. O'Connor, 19, and Robb S. Godshaw, 22. The university acted after the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh asked it to investigate a parade and carnival at CMU at which a female student was photographed “dressed from the waist up in an ensemble that resembles the clothing worn by the pope.
NEWS
September 20, 2009 | Karin Brulliard
As military rule ended in Nigeria a decade ago, an Islamic legal system was swept into place on a wave of popular support in the country's desperately poor and mostly Muslim northern states. It has turned out in a way few expected. The draconian sentences to amputation that human rights activists warned of and the religious oppression that Christians feared for the most part have not come to pass. But neither has the utopia envisioned by backers of Sharia law, who believed politicians' promises that it would end decades of corruption and pillaging by civilian and military rulers.
WORLD
November 8, 2009 | John M. Glionna
The young couple are totally busted. They sit at a beach-side park, near signs forbidding teens from sitting too close. He has his arm around her shoulder. She isn't wearing her jilbab , the traditional Islamic head scarf. Just like that, the morality cops are in their face. "You two aren't married, right?" asks Syafruddin, the rail-thin leader of the six-man patrol, standing stiffly, one hand behind his back. "So you shouldn't sit next to one another." He separates the two and confiscates their IDs. Later, he says, the team will open an investigation of the couple, especially seeing as the young man lied, at first insisting the girl was his sister.
NEWS
April 19, 1985 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
Nodredin Ahmed Aissa felt as though red-hot lava had been poured through his veins and into his heart. He threw back the mask covering his eyes. On his left was a dead man hanging from the steel gallows, on his right, a bloodied prostrate body. But what he most clearly remembers about that October morning is the prison guard who had picked up his severed right hand and left leg and was parading them to the cheers of the crowd. Aissa fainted.
WORLD
November 23, 2008 | times wire reports
Malaysia's top Islamic body banned Muslims from practicing yoga, saying the Indian physical exercise contains elements of Hinduism that could corrupt Muslims. The national council that has the authority to rule on how Muslims must conduct their faith, issued a fatwa, or edict, saying that yoga involves not just exercise but also includes Hindu spiritual elements, chanting and worship. Decisions by the council in Malaysia are not legally binding on Muslims, who make up nearly two-thirds of the country's 25 million people, unless they are enshrined in national or Sharia laws.
WORLD
August 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The first woman in Muslim-majority Malaysia to face caning for drinking beer was reprieved because of the holy month of Ramadan. Islamic officials had taken Kartika Sari Dewi Shukarno, a 32-year-old mother of two, into custody and were driving her to a women's prison for the caning when they abruptly turned around and sent her back to her family home in northern Malaysia. Enforcement officials of the Islamic Religious Department arrested Kartika in a raid for drinking beer at a hotel lounge in Cherating in Pahang state in December 2007.
NEWS
July 27, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Club-wielding security forces attacked and dispersed a group of Muslims holding an unauthorized outdoor prayer service Friday, in an escalating crackdown on religious fundamentalists demanding the immediate imposition of Islamic law in Egypt. About 15 people were detained, according to witnesses. Most were followers of Sheik Hafez Salama, a militant fundamentalist who was arrested two weeks ago on charges of distributing seditious literature. Salama is still in custody.
WORLD
April 30, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In Afghanistan, Iraq and many other countries across the globe, most Muslims support making sharia , or Islamic law, the official law of the land, according to a sweeping survey released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. But sharia means different things to different Muslims, according to the study. Some supporters believe it should apply only to Muslims. Some want it used in only some kinds of cases. And many Muslims disagree on the morality of divorce, polygamy and birth control.
WORLD
October 10, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt unveiled a proposed draft of a new constitution Wednesday amid criticism from liberals and human rights groups that the document is tilted toward Islamic law and endangers the democratic ideals of the uprising that last year overthrew Hosni Mubarak. The partial draft, which was opened for public review, immediately revealed the battle lines between Islamists and secularists over the nation's character. Dominated by ultraconservative and moderate Islamists, the 100-member assembly that wrote the charter made it clear that civil and religious rights would be shaped through the prism of Islam.
WORLD
May 22, 2012 | By Zaid al-Alayaa and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
SANA, Yemen - A suicide bomber targeted soldiers rehearsing Monday for a military parade here, killing as many as 112 people and signaling that Islamic extremists may be shifting their focus to Yemen's capital after weeks of intense battles in outlying provinces with U.S.-backed government forces. Al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia claimed responsibility for the bombing in retaliation for American-assisted government offensives against its strongholds in southern Yemen. Unnerved by increasedU.S.
WORLD
April 5, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The men gathering outside the yellow mosque agreed: Adulterers should be stoned to death, the hands of thieves cut off. "But not now," said Kareem Atta, waiting in a cool breeze for the sheik's car to roll up next to the Koran sellers. " Sharia law must be gradually put into place so it doesn't shock the system. You can't cut people's hands off if you first don't give them financial justice. " The young students, engineers and laborers are followers of Hazem Salah abu Ismail, a lawyer and holy man whose poetic blend of populism and ultraconservative Salafi Islam has turned him into a leading presidential candidate.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling that blocked the implementation of an Oklahoma law barring judges from considering international or Islamic law in their decisions. The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, in a ruling released Tuesday, affirmed an order by a district court judge in 2010 that prevented the voter-approved state constitutional amendment from taking effect. The ruling also allows a Muslim community leader in Oklahoma City to continue his legal challenge of the law's constitutionality.
OPINION
May 20, 2011
Re "Terminated? Not likely," May 18 The end of the road for former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger? Not likely. He will probably go down in the history books with the likes of Bill Clinton, Tiger Woods and Kobe Bryant. Just look at former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer; he got caught in a prostitution ring, and now he has his own show on CNN. The American public can sometimes be too tolerant of sex scandals, immediately placing celebrities on a pedestal where they don't belong. Instead of expecting Schwarzenegger to apologize to Californians, we should ignore his future endeavors in film, politics, green energy or whatever.
OPINION
May 20, 2011
Re "Terminated? Not likely," May 18 The end of the road for former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger? Not likely. He will probably go down in the history books with the likes of Bill Clinton, Tiger Woods and Kobe Bryant. Just look at former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer; he got caught in a prostitution ring, and now he has his own show on CNN. The American public can sometimes be too tolerant of sex scandals, immediately placing celebrities on a pedestal where they don't belong. Instead of expecting Schwarzenegger to apologize to Californians, we should ignore his future endeavors in film, politics, green energy or whatever.
OPINION
July 10, 2013 | By Ty McCormick
To the extent that the Obama administration has responded to the ouster of Mohamed Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president, it has largely accepted the shake-up as a necessary, if not fully legitimate, response to the bumbling incompetence and growing authoritarianism of his government. President Obama is "deeply concerned" by the military's decision to remove Morsi, but he has not described it as a "coup" - a designation that might have imperiled the $1.3 billion in U.S. aid Egypt receives annually - or called for Morsi's reinstatement.
OPINION
May 16, 2011
A federal appeals court will soon consider a challenge to an Oklahoma measure prohibiting the use of Sharia, or Islamic law, in the state's courts. The constitutional amendment is part of a national trend in which politicians — including Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich — argue that it is vital to prevent Sharia from insinuating itself into the administration of justice in U.S. courts. Never mind that there is scant evidence that American judges are resolving cases on the basis of Sharia.
WORLD
March 6, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Saudi Arabia warned its few but increasingly emboldened political activists Saturday that it would enforce the law banning public demonstrations, providing fresh evidence of the government's growing nervousness over political unrest among its neighbors and calls for change at home. Saudi Arabia has remained relatively calm as political upheaval has swept the Middle East and North Africa over the last two months. But discontent is lapping at its borders, most notably in Bahrain and Yemen, stoking concerns that widespread calls for change could occur in the kingdom, a key U.S. ally in the region.
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