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WORLD
May 14, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
Hours after Egypt's former first lady, Suzanne Mubarak, was ordered detained as part of the widening corruption investigation of her husband's regime, she was hospitalized after reportedly suffering a heart attack, officials said Friday. The manager of a hospital in the Red Sea resort town of Sharm el Sheik told the state news agency MENA that she had been transferred to intensive care. The hospital official told the news agency that the former first lady would undergo tests over the next 24 hours to determine whether she had suffered a heart attack.
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WORLD
July 18, 2011 | By Amro Hassan and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Interim Egyptian Prime Minister Essam Sharaf made sweeping changes to his Cabinet on Sunday in a move to calm nine days of protests in Tahrir Square against the nation's ruling military council and the slow pace of political reform. Sharaf promised last week to reshuffle his government and purge the Interior Ministry of police officers and top officials accused in the deaths of more than 800 protesters during the crackdown on the revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak in February.
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NEWS
December 13, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
The 250 U.S. soldiers killed in Thursday's crash were part of the world's youngest peacekeeping force and also the least visible, thanks to strict Egyptian and Israeli observance of the peace treaty the troops were helping to enforce. The 250 from the 101st Airborne Division had just completed a six-month tour of duty in the Sinai desert with the 11-nation Multinational Force and Observers (MFO), a 2,600-member group set up to monitor compliance with the 1979 Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.
WORLD
May 25, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Egypt will put Hosni Mubarak, its president for three decades, on trial in connection with the deaths of protesters during the uprising that forced him from office, prosecutors said Tuesday, raising the prospect that the region's push for reform would force a modern Arab strongman to face justice before his own people. Adel Said, a spokesman for Egypt's prosecutor general, said Mubarak could face the death penalty on charges that he conspired in the killings. But the announcement appeared aimed at least in part at appeasing victims' families and blunting a major demonstration planned for Friday.
WORLD
February 5, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The tourist camels are idle. The trinket shops are empty. The gates of the pyramid complex are locked up tight. The 12-day-old uprising against President Hosni Mubarak has delivered a body blow to Egypt's lucrative tourist trade. Visitors are the country's principal source of foreign exchange, and tourism accounts for 7% of Egypt's gross domestic product. In normal times, which these most decidedly are not, winter is the height of the tourist season. With a respite from soaring summer temperatures, the cooler months are the most popular for taking languid cruises on the Nile, visiting desert oases, touring the majestic temples of Luxor or snorkeling and scuba-diving among the Red Sea coral reefs.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Amro Hassan and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  In his first public speech since he was forced from power two months ago, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said Sunday that he and his family were victims of a campaign by political enemies seeking to tarnish their reputation by exaggerating their wealth with false charges of corruption. The pre-recorded audio address came the same day the Egyptian prosecutor general's office announced that Mubarak and sons Gamal — who many believed would have been his successor — and Alaa were summoned for questioning regarding the violence that left about 300 people dead during the revolt that toppled the regime on Feb. 11. The legal move appeared to be an attempt by the country's ruling military council to appease protesters who have criticized the army for not moving swiftly enough to indict Mubarak and his inner circle.
WORLD
July 18, 2011 | By Amro Hassan and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Interim Egyptian Prime Minister Essam Sharaf made sweeping changes to his Cabinet on Sunday in a move to calm nine days of protests in Tahrir Square against the nation's ruling military council and the slow pace of political reform. Sharaf promised last week to reshuffle his government and purge the Interior Ministry of police officers and top officials accused in the deaths of more than 800 protesters during the crackdown on the revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak in February.
WORLD
May 22, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
It has been more than three months since former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted and more than a month since he was detained, yet he has not set foot inside Tora prison, where his two sons have been held during a corruption probe. Egypt's 83-year-old former ruler has insisted, with the help of state medical evaluations, that he suffers from a heart problem too complicated for prison doctors to treat. The protesters who helped bring down Mubarak in February are growing increasingly angry over his diagnosis, which originated with examinations and reports by the country's Department of Forensic Medicine, a division of the Justice Ministry widely criticized for covering up torture by security forces during his nearly 30-year rule.
WORLD
May 25, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Egypt will put Hosni Mubarak, its president for three decades, on trial in connection with the deaths of protesters during the uprising that forced him from office, prosecutors said Tuesday, raising the prospect that the region's push for reform would force a modern Arab strongman to face justice before his own people. Adel Said, a spokesman for Egypt's prosecutor general, said Mubarak could face the death penalty on charges that he conspired in the killings. But the announcement appeared aimed at least in part at appeasing victims' families and blunting a major demonstration planned for Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997 | HILLARY MANN, Hillary Mann, an attorney and former aide to the National Security Council, is an associate fellow of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy
The suicide bombing of a Tel Aviv cafe and the murder of seven Israeli schoolgirls by a Jordanian soldier coincided with the first anniversary of the "Summit of Peacemakers" in Sharm el Sheik, Egypt.
WORLD
May 22, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
It has been more than three months since former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted and more than a month since he was detained, yet he has not set foot inside Tora prison, where his two sons have been held during a corruption probe. Egypt's 83-year-old former ruler has insisted, with the help of state medical evaluations, that he suffers from a heart problem too complicated for prison doctors to treat. The protesters who helped bring down Mubarak in February are growing increasingly angry over his diagnosis, which originated with examinations and reports by the country's Department of Forensic Medicine, a division of the Justice Ministry widely criticized for covering up torture by security forces during his nearly 30-year rule.
WORLD
May 14, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
Hours after Egypt's former first lady, Suzanne Mubarak, was ordered detained as part of the widening corruption investigation of her husband's regime, she was hospitalized after reportedly suffering a heart attack, officials said Friday. The manager of a hospital in the Red Sea resort town of Sharm el Sheik told the state news agency MENA that she had been transferred to intensive care. The hospital official told the news agency that the former first lady would undergo tests over the next 24 hours to determine whether she had suffered a heart attack.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Amro Hassan and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  In his first public speech since he was forced from power two months ago, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said Sunday that he and his family were victims of a campaign by political enemies seeking to tarnish their reputation by exaggerating their wealth with false charges of corruption. The pre-recorded audio address came the same day the Egyptian prosecutor general's office announced that Mubarak and sons Gamal — who many believed would have been his successor — and Alaa were summoned for questioning regarding the violence that left about 300 people dead during the revolt that toppled the regime on Feb. 11. The legal move appeared to be an attempt by the country's ruling military council to appease protesters who have criticized the army for not moving swiftly enough to indict Mubarak and his inner circle.
WORLD
February 5, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The tourist camels are idle. The trinket shops are empty. The gates of the pyramid complex are locked up tight. The 12-day-old uprising against President Hosni Mubarak has delivered a body blow to Egypt's lucrative tourist trade. Visitors are the country's principal source of foreign exchange, and tourism accounts for 7% of Egypt's gross domestic product. In normal times, which these most decidedly are not, winter is the height of the tourist season. With a respite from soaring summer temperatures, the cooler months are the most popular for taking languid cruises on the Nile, visiting desert oases, touring the majestic temples of Luxor or snorkeling and scuba-diving among the Red Sea coral reefs.
HOME & GARDEN
January 31, 2009 | Paul Young
As architects with more than a passing interest in urban planning, Ali Jeevanjee and Poonam Sharma were thrilled to move to Chinatown, where the mix of residential and retail development in close proximity to public transit makes for a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood. "The idea of community might be a little unusual for Los Angeles," says Jeevanjee, 33. "But this is a real community. In fact, it has the strongest sense of community that I've ever experienced."
WORLD
July 24, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Silence can sound sinister when it comes to a cheerful beach resort on a brilliant July day. The silence was thick here Saturday morning as people blinked out of a sleepless night. The Road of Peace, the main boulevard of the tourist district, stood empty and baking under a cloudless sky. Shards of storefront windows littered the walkways like spilled beads. The alleys were strewn with belly dancing costumes and piles of scarves abandoned by shopkeepers who fled the three bomb blasts.
WORLD
July 24, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Silence can sound sinister when it comes to a cheerful beach resort on a brilliant July day. The silence was thick here Saturday morning as people blinked out of a sleepless night. The Road of Peace, the main boulevard of the tourist district, stood empty and baking under a cloudless sky. Shards of storefront windows littered the walkways like spilled beads. The alleys were strewn with belly dancing costumes and piles of scarves abandoned by shopkeepers who fled the three bomb blasts.
HOME & GARDEN
January 31, 2009 | Paul Young
As architects with more than a passing interest in urban planning, Ali Jeevanjee and Poonam Sharma were thrilled to move to Chinatown, where the mix of residential and retail development in close proximity to public transit makes for a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood. "The idea of community might be a little unusual for Los Angeles," says Jeevanjee, 33. "But this is a real community. In fact, it has the strongest sense of community that I've ever experienced."
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Admonished by President Clinton that "we can't afford to fail," Israeli and Palestinian leaders talked far past midnight today, then recessed their Middle East crisis summit until a final meeting later in the morning. White House officials said the leaders made enough progress to continue past the original deadline of midnight Monday. They tried to complete their work in a single day, but fatigue got the better of them a little after 2 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997 | HILLARY MANN, Hillary Mann, an attorney and former aide to the National Security Council, is an associate fellow of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy
The suicide bombing of a Tel Aviv cafe and the murder of seven Israeli schoolgirls by a Jordanian soldier coincided with the first anniversary of the "Summit of Peacemakers" in Sharm el Sheik, Egypt.
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