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Sharmon Shah

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SPORTS
November 15, 1994 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rose Bowl watch on his left wrist and the ring on his right hand are reminders of what was: UCLA success, personal despair. The 1,000-yard season is testimony to what is: personal success in a season of UCLA frustration. In between, Sharmon Shah embarked on a search for truth and learned that the longer he looked, the more he understood he had had it all along. What he needed was time to look back and some trials to understand it all. His knees gave him both.
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SPORTS
December 3, 2005
One of the mantras of the BCS apologists is, "We must save the bowl system." Well if UCLA should upset USC, the Bruins will end up 10-1, having beaten the country's No. 1 team and ending the Trojans' 33-game winning streak, and their reward will be ... the Sun Bowl. This is a system that cries for destruction. RICHARD TURNER Fontana I thought J.A. Adande's "33" article [Nov. 29] was interesting. If you have ever heard the urban legend behind the Rolling Rock "33" [supposedly representing 1933, the year Prohibition was repealed]
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SPORTS
October 7, 1993 | JIM HODGES
He spends his practices in the training room with ice on his swollen right knee, which is just another problem in a season of problems. So will Sharmon Shah fold up his game this season and ask the Pacific 10 Conference for a medical-hardship redshirt designation that would allow him to be a UCLA sophomore in 1994? He says "probably," and then says he hopes he can play again soon.
SPORTS
August 27, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The school is UCLA. The number is 33. The name is Karim Abdul-Jabbar. The raised eyebrows are inevitable. Even though this Abdul-Jabbar plays football, not basketball. Even though this Abdul-Jabbar spells his first name K-A-R-I-M, whereas the Abdul-Jabbar who led the school to three consecutive NCAA basketball championships in the late '60s spells his first name K-A-R-E-E-M.
SPORTS
August 21, 1994 | JIM HODGES
Eighty plays were scheduled Saturday, with full contact and officials--everything UCLA needed to get an idea of how ready it is to play Tennessee in two weeks. The answer is: not all that ready, because the 80 were marked down to 77--or 16, depending on who is counting. The first 61 plays did not finish in a tackle, the better to keep Bruins free of injury. The other 16 were run with third- or fourth-stringers.
SPORTS
December 3, 2005
One of the mantras of the BCS apologists is, "We must save the bowl system." Well if UCLA should upset USC, the Bruins will end up 10-1, having beaten the country's No. 1 team and ending the Trojans' 33-game winning streak, and their reward will be ... the Sun Bowl. This is a system that cries for destruction. RICHARD TURNER Fontana I thought J.A. Adande's "33" article [Nov. 29] was interesting. If you have ever heard the urban legend behind the Rolling Rock "33" [supposedly representing 1933, the year Prohibition was repealed]
SPORTS
January 2, 1992 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banning High tailback Shayzar Hawkins, who set a school record for rushing yards in a season, has been named L.A. City Section 4-A Division co-player of the year with Dorsey running back Sharmon Shah, it was announced today. Hawkins led a contingent of five Banning players on the All-City 4-A team, as selected by the Amateur Athletic Foundation/First Interstate Bank board of sportswriters. Carson placed four players on the squad.
SPORTS
August 16, 1994 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sharmon Shah did a disappearing act worthy of Houdini or a one-song rock star. Now you see him on stage, living up to his nickname, Hollywood Shah carrying 40 times for 187 yards against Stanford. Now you don't see him again until the 1993 season has ended and someone else has the spotlight. He was the back who was going to make UCLA's running game go. Then he was going to a hospital, his season over.
SPORTS
September 27, 1992 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Team Heisman took the field Saturday without a brochure and without warning. Unlike Marshall Faulk, it had six legs and three sets of lungs. In UCLA's 35-7 victory over San Diego State at the Rose Bowl, Team Heisman rushed for 278 yards and scored three touchdowns. It averaged 6.5 yards per carry. It carried the Bruins through the 95-degree heat and the Aztecs' secondary. Team Heisman will not win the coveted award because they don't divide the trophy into three parts.
SPORTS
October 1, 1992 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Naim Shah piled his seven children into the car for a weekend outing. He took them to skid row, where they drove slowly along Main Street, staring at people sleeping on the sidewalk. "I wanted them to see what choices they had in life," Shah said. "A lot of times people wind up down there because of bad decisions and misdirection." Shah instilled a work ethic in his children at an early age.
SPORTS
November 15, 1994 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rose Bowl watch on his left wrist and the ring on his right hand are reminders of what was: UCLA success, personal despair. The 1,000-yard season is testimony to what is: personal success in a season of UCLA frustration. In between, Sharmon Shah embarked on a search for truth and learned that the longer he looked, the more he understood he had had it all along. What he needed was time to look back and some trials to understand it all. His knees gave him both.
SPORTS
August 21, 1994 | JIM HODGES
Eighty plays were scheduled Saturday, with full contact and officials--everything UCLA needed to get an idea of how ready it is to play Tennessee in two weeks. The answer is: not all that ready, because the 80 were marked down to 77--or 16, depending on who is counting. The first 61 plays did not finish in a tackle, the better to keep Bruins free of injury. The other 16 were run with third- or fourth-stringers.
SPORTS
August 16, 1994 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sharmon Shah did a disappearing act worthy of Houdini or a one-song rock star. Now you see him on stage, living up to his nickname, Hollywood Shah carrying 40 times for 187 yards against Stanford. Now you don't see him again until the 1993 season has ended and someone else has the spotlight. He was the back who was going to make UCLA's running game go. Then he was going to a hospital, his season over.
SPORTS
October 7, 1993 | JIM HODGES
He spends his practices in the training room with ice on his swollen right knee, which is just another problem in a season of problems. So will Sharmon Shah fold up his game this season and ask the Pacific 10 Conference for a medical-hardship redshirt designation that would allow him to be a UCLA sophomore in 1994? He says "probably," and then says he hopes he can play again soon.
SPORTS
September 23, 1993 | JIM HODGES
Concerned that his injured knee is not responding to treatment, UCLA running back Sharmon Shah is considering redshirting this season. Coach Terry Donahue met with a discouraged Shah, the Bruin medical staff and spoke with Shah's father, Naim, after practice Wednesday and said that Shah was considering the move, even though he was sound enough to run the ball 10 times for 58 yards against Nebraska on Saturday.
SPORTS
October 1, 1992 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Naim Shah piled his seven children into the car for a weekend outing. He took them to skid row, where they drove slowly along Main Street, staring at people sleeping on the sidewalk. "I wanted them to see what choices they had in life," Shah said. "A lot of times people wind up down there because of bad decisions and misdirection." Shah instilled a work ethic in his children at an early age.
SPORTS
September 27, 1992 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Team Heisman took the field Saturday without a brochure and without warning. Unlike Marshall Faulk, it had six legs and three sets of lungs. In UCLA's 35-7 victory over San Diego State at the Rose Bowl, Team Heisman rushed for 278 yards and scored three touchdowns. It averaged 6.5 yards per carry. It carried the Bruins through the 95-degree heat and the Aztecs' secondary. Team Heisman will not win the coveted award because they don't divide the trophy into three parts.
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