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Sharon Bush

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February 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A multimillionaire financier once engaged to marry President Bush's former sister-in-law is suing her for the return of an 11-carat diamond engagement ring that he says is worth $434,000. Gerald Tsai Jr., 78, says in his lawsuit that after he and Sharon Bush, 55, agreed to marry in October 2006, he bought her the rectangular yellow diamond ring from Saks Fifth Avenue for $243,000. It is now worth much more, he said.
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NATIONAL
February 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A multimillionaire financier once engaged to marry President Bush's former sister-in-law is suing her for the return of an 11-carat diamond engagement ring that he says is worth $434,000. Gerald Tsai Jr., 78, says in his lawsuit that after he and Sharon Bush, 55, agreed to marry in October 2006, he bought her the rectangular yellow diamond ring from Saks Fifth Avenue for $243,000. It is now worth much more, he said.
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BUSINESS
July 20, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spokesmen for Neil Bush said Thursday that the President's son was not trying to reduce personal liability resulting from his role in the failure of a Denver thrift when he listed his wife as owner of a $550,000 home purchased last year. "I was not even consulted on it regarding any liability and didn't know about it until the last couple of weeks," said James E. Nesland, Bush's lawyer, referring to reports about the Denver house published by newspapers in Colorado.
WORLD
January 6, 2006 | Tyler Marshall and Laura King, Times Staff Writers
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's stroke has left a gaping hole in the Bush administration's approach to resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and stabilizing the broader Middle East. For much of President Bush's tenure, U.S. policy in the dispute has been shaped more by Sharon's ideas than any other factor. Sharon remained in grave condition Thursday at a hospital in Jerusalem, where he was placed in a medically induced coma after nearly eight hours of neurosurgery.
WORLD
January 6, 2006 | Tyler Marshall and Laura King, Times Staff Writers
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's stroke has left a gaping hole in the Bush administration's approach to resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and stabilizing the broader Middle East. For much of President Bush's tenure, U.S. policy in the dispute has been shaped more by Sharon's ideas than any other factor. Sharon remained in grave condition Thursday at a hospital in Jerusalem, where he was placed in a medically induced coma after nearly eight hours of neurosurgery.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In December 1998, shortly before he decided to run for president, then-Gov. George W. Bush made a three-day visit to Israel and came home with two indelible memories. One was of standing on the hill in the Galilee where Jesus preached the Sermon on the Mount, and reciting the words to "Amazing Grace." The other was of a helicopter tour over Israel's narrow 1967 boundaries and the occupied West Bank--a tour conducted personally by then-Foreign Minister Ariel Sharon.
OPINION
April 16, 2004 | Dennis Ross
In diplomacy, there are times when process and substance take on equal importance. Ideas that might be acceptable, or at least tolerable, if presented one way become wholly unacceptable when presented another way. That may help explain some of the backlash against President Bush's announcement Wednesday that the U.S. would endorse Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's unilateral plans for the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
WORLD
June 7, 2002 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Israeli attack on Yasser Arafat's West Bank headquarters Thursday delivered a message not only to the Palestinian leader but also to President Bush: This Israeli government will not bend in its refusal to have anything to do with Arafat. With the rubble of Arafat's offices still smoking, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon prepared to head to Washington for a Monday meeting with Bush.
WORLD
April 24, 2004 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, who is fighting to shore up support among hard-liners in his Likud Party, said Friday that he had told President Bush during their White House meeting last week that he no longer felt bound by an earlier pledge not to harm Yasser Arafat. Sharon's threat against the Palestinian Authority president was by no means new, but his remarks seemed designed to imply that he had the tacit approval of the U.S. administration for any action Israel takes against Arafat.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | Associated Press
Police arrested nine people who staged a noisy sit-down demonstration in the Capitol on Thursday to protest Medicaid changes in the Republican budget that would affect AIDS victims. They were among hundreds of people from various groups who protested budget proposals being pushed through Congress that would curtail a range of programs, including Medicare and student loans.
WORLD
April 24, 2004 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, who is fighting to shore up support among hard-liners in his Likud Party, said Friday that he had told President Bush during their White House meeting last week that he no longer felt bound by an earlier pledge not to harm Yasser Arafat. Sharon's threat against the Palestinian Authority president was by no means new, but his remarks seemed designed to imply that he had the tacit approval of the U.S. administration for any action Israel takes against Arafat.
OPINION
April 16, 2004 | Dennis Ross
In diplomacy, there are times when process and substance take on equal importance. Ideas that might be acceptable, or at least tolerable, if presented one way become wholly unacceptable when presented another way. That may help explain some of the backlash against President Bush's announcement Wednesday that the U.S. would endorse Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's unilateral plans for the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
WORLD
June 7, 2002 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Israeli attack on Yasser Arafat's West Bank headquarters Thursday delivered a message not only to the Palestinian leader but also to President Bush: This Israeli government will not bend in its refusal to have anything to do with Arafat. With the rubble of Arafat's offices still smoking, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon prepared to head to Washington for a Monday meeting with Bush.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In December 1998, shortly before he decided to run for president, then-Gov. George W. Bush made a three-day visit to Israel and came home with two indelible memories. One was of standing on the hill in the Galilee where Jesus preached the Sermon on the Mount, and reciting the words to "Amazing Grace." The other was of a helicopter tour over Israel's narrow 1967 boundaries and the occupied West Bank--a tour conducted personally by then-Foreign Minister Ariel Sharon.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spokesmen for Neil Bush said Thursday that the President's son was not trying to reduce personal liability resulting from his role in the failure of a Denver thrift when he listed his wife as owner of a $550,000 home purchased last year. "I was not even consulted on it regarding any liability and didn't know about it until the last couple of weeks," said James E. Nesland, Bush's lawyer, referring to reports about the Denver house published by newspapers in Colorado.
NEWS
April 8, 2002 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of demonstrators divided over the Middle East conflict battled in Paris on Sunday during a march against anti-Semitism, attacking journalists and stabbing a police officer before authorities dispersed them with tear gas. The clash at the historic Place de la Bastille occurred on the sidelines of a march by 50,000 people protesting a wave of attacks on Jewish schools, cemeteries and synagogues in France amid escalating violence in the Middle East.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2003 | Warren Vieth and Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writers
Neil Bush, a younger brother of President Bush, has a $400,000-a-year contract to provide business advice to a Chinese computer chip manufacturer, according to court documents. At the same time the Bush administration is promising to crack down on alleged trade abuses by the Chinese, Neil Bush has agreed to strategize with China's Grace Semiconductor Manufacturing Corp., the documents show.
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