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Sharon Christa Mcauliffe

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NEWS
August 6, 1987 | Associated Press
A planetarium topped by a pyramid will be built in honor of teacher Sharon Christa McAuliffe, who died in the shuttle Challenger explosion, a special legislative committee ruled Wednesday. The planetarium and a teaching center, to be built at the New Hampshire Technical Institute, will become part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's teacher resource laboratories. NASA plans to open one laboratory in each state.
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NEWS
June 24, 1994 | Associated Press
The chairman of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration committee reviewing the teacher-in-space program said Thursday that he favors reviving the project but that the space agency is not close to a decision. The mother of Sharon Christa McAuliffe, meanwhile, said that renewing the program would just bring back bad memories of the accident that killed her daughter. McAuliffe, of Concord, N.H., was selected in a national contest to become the first teacher in space.
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NEWS
January 27, 1986
A gloomy forecast prompted NASA to scrub Sunday's scheduled launching of the shuttle mission to send schoolteacher Sharon Christa McAuliffe and others into space, but the sun shone after all and Challenger could have lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center, space agency officials said. The launch, already postponed once because of bad weather, was rescheduled for 6:30 a.m. PST today.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | Associated Press
President Bush on Tuesday nominated Steven J. McAuliffe, the husband of Challenger explosion victim Sharon Christa McAuliffe, to be a U.S. district judge for New Hampshire. If confirmed by the Senate, Steven McAuliffe, 44, would succeed Norman H. Stahl. Christa McAuliffe, a schoolteacher, was one of seven crew members aboard the space shuttle when it exploded shortly after liftoff on Jan. 28, 1986. She was to have conducted classes from space for thousands of schoolchildren.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | Associated Press
President Bush on Tuesday nominated Steven J. McAuliffe, the husband of Challenger explosion victim Sharon Christa McAuliffe, to be a U.S. district judge for New Hampshire. If confirmed by the Senate, Steven McAuliffe, 44, would succeed Norman H. Stahl. Christa McAuliffe, a schoolteacher, was one of seven crew members aboard the space shuttle when it exploded shortly after liftoff on Jan. 28, 1986. She was to have conducted classes from space for thousands of schoolchildren.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | Associated Press
The chairman of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration committee reviewing the teacher-in-space program said Thursday that he favors reviving the project but that the space agency is not close to a decision. The mother of Sharon Christa McAuliffe, meanwhile, said that renewing the program would just bring back bad memories of the accident that killed her daughter. McAuliffe, of Concord, N.H., was selected in a national contest to become the first teacher in space.
NEWS
February 4, 1986 | From Associated Press
As friends and families in Ohio, New Hampshire and South Carolina remembered the dead from the space shuttle on Monday, America's first man in orbit challenged the living to "fix it and get on with it." Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) recalled the last words from shuttle commander Francis R. (Dick) Scobee--"Roger, go at throttle up"--before the Challenger exploded last Tuesday.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | DEBORAH CHRISTENSEN
In a rare public appearance, the widower of Sharon Christa McAuliffe helped break ground for a planetarium in Concord, N. H., dedicated to the social studies teacher who perished with six other crew members in the 1986 explosion of the shuttle Challenger. Steven McAuliffe and Christa McAuliffe's parents, Grace and Ed Corrigan, joined New Hampshire Gov. John H. Sununu, astronaut Robert Allan Parker and about a dozen state officials as construction was begun on the $2.
NEWS
February 1, 1986 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Friday was to have been the day that Sharon Christa McAuliffe taught her first class from space. Instead, the 37-year-old "teachernaut," as people here have taken to calling their most famous citizen, became the subject of a day's worth of public remembrances. "She taught us to reach. She taught us to go forward," said 16-year-old Scott Kibby, a junior at Concord High School, where McAuliffe had taught social studies, history, law and women's issues.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From United Press International
An estimated 270 elementary schoolchildren took part Friday in the inauguration of the Christa McAuliffe Planetarium, built in memory of the Concord teacher who died aboard the space shuttle Challenger. The students, most of whom were toddlers when the Challenger exploded on Jan. 28, 1986, packed the halls of the $2.6-million gleaming pyramid-shaped planetarium building, waiting in line for the star and space science show to begin. "Stars, planets.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From United Press International
An estimated 270 elementary schoolchildren took part Friday in the inauguration of the Christa McAuliffe Planetarium, built in memory of the Concord teacher who died aboard the space shuttle Challenger. The students, most of whom were toddlers when the Challenger exploded on Jan. 28, 1986, packed the halls of the $2.6-million gleaming pyramid-shaped planetarium building, waiting in line for the star and space science show to begin. "Stars, planets.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | DEBORAH CHRISTENSEN
In a rare public appearance, the widower of Sharon Christa McAuliffe helped break ground for a planetarium in Concord, N. H., dedicated to the social studies teacher who perished with six other crew members in the 1986 explosion of the shuttle Challenger. Steven McAuliffe and Christa McAuliffe's parents, Grace and Ed Corrigan, joined New Hampshire Gov. John H. Sununu, astronaut Robert Allan Parker and about a dozen state officials as construction was begun on the $2.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | Associated Press
A planetarium topped by a pyramid will be built in honor of teacher Sharon Christa McAuliffe, who died in the shuttle Challenger explosion, a special legislative committee ruled Wednesday. The planetarium and a teaching center, to be built at the New Hampshire Technical Institute, will become part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's teacher resource laboratories. NASA plans to open one laboratory in each state.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
The brother of Sharon Christa McAuliffe accused the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of exploiting his sister for the sake of publicity and called on the government to abandon for now programs to put everyday people into space. "They shouldn't be using the public for something that's mainly for the government," said Christopher Corrigan of Framingham, Mass., whose sister was chosen to be the first private citizen in space. She died in the Jan. 28, 1986, Challenger explosion.
NEWS
February 4, 1986 | From Associated Press
As friends and families in Ohio, New Hampshire and South Carolina remembered the dead from the space shuttle on Monday, America's first man in orbit challenged the living to "fix it and get on with it." Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) recalled the last words from shuttle commander Francis R. (Dick) Scobee--"Roger, go at throttle up"--before the Challenger exploded last Tuesday.
NEWS
February 1, 1986 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Friday was to have been the day that Sharon Christa McAuliffe taught her first class from space. Instead, the 37-year-old "teachernaut," as people here have taken to calling their most famous citizen, became the subject of a day's worth of public remembrances. "She taught us to reach. She taught us to go forward," said 16-year-old Scott Kibby, a junior at Concord High School, where McAuliffe had taught social studies, history, law and women's issues.
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