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Sharon Isbin

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August 20, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
The superb artistry of Sharon Isbin clearly demonstrates that music can be more powerful when it's soft and intimate than when it's loud and grandiose. In recital, Friday night in Ramo Auditorium at Caltech, Pasadena, the Juilliard-based guitarist treated her audience to a diverse, satisfying program that emphasized a rare suppleness and quiet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Irene Lacher
In Los Angeles, Alan Chapman is well known as a font of information about classical music. Since 1992, he has been one of the marquee voices of KUSC-FM (91.5), the all-classical-all-the-time public radio station, now hosting a morning show each weekday as well as two weekend shows he also produces, "Modern Times" and "Thornton Center Stage." And he has been a pre-concert lecture maven for even longer. A Yale-educated music theory scholar who teaches at the Colburn Conservatory, Chapman belies the cliché that those who can't do teach.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997 | Ken Smith, Ken Smith is a freelance writer based in New York
"The guitar draws a lot of young people to concerts," Sharon Isbin contends with conviction. "It's the instrument that helped lead to the development of jazz, blues and country music. Everyone has grown up with it, in one way or another." She pauses a beat to set up her counterpoint. "The downside is that because it's so well known as an accompanying instrument people don't realize it can be a classical instrument as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although not apparent from the offerings of most orchestras, there actually is a substantial body of guitar concertos. Saturday evening, Sharon Isbin brought one of the latest, the "Concert de Gaudi" by Christopher Rouse, to the Long Beach Symphony and Terrace Theater. Lacking a canon of standard masterpieces, guitarists have always been particularly receptive to new work--and few artists more eagerly so than Isbin, who has already premiered nine concertos.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although not apparent from the offerings of most orchestras, there actually is a substantial body of guitar concertos. Saturday evening, Sharon Isbin brought one of the latest, the "Concert de Gaudi" by Christopher Rouse, to the Long Beach Symphony and Terrace Theater. Lacking a canon of standard masterpieces, guitarists have always been particularly receptive to new work--and few artists more eagerly so than Isbin, who has already premiered nine concertos.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Irene Lacher
In Los Angeles, Alan Chapman is well known as a font of information about classical music. Since 1992, he has been one of the marquee voices of KUSC-FM (91.5), the all-classical-all-the-time public radio station, now hosting a morning show each weekday as well as two weekend shows he also produces, "Modern Times" and "Thornton Center Stage." And he has been a pre-concert lecture maven for even longer. A Yale-educated music theory scholar who teaches at the Colburn Conservatory, Chapman belies the cliché that those who can't do teach.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
Anyone who's heard Sharon Isbin play classical guitar cannot help but note the water-smooth clarity and penetrating intelligence she brings to her music. Isbin, who plays tonight at Occidental College, is never dry in the name of rectitude, never coasts through one part of a piece in order to speed on to a brilliant highlight. Which isn't to say that she doesn't have fun up there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're a county resident who has been out of town or in reclusion, you may not have noticed anything special about the Ventura classical music scene this month. For everyone else, the signs are everywhere, literally: The Ventura Chamber Music Festival, now in its sixth annual edition, will consume our attentions and continue a bold lineage. All told, the festival, running through May 14, looks to be a well-balanced display of chamber music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For its sixth annual edition, the laudable Ventura Chamber Music Festival follows up on a proven formula. Over its history, the festival has done well by string quartets and classical guitar. The first official festival weekend, May 5-7, features both the Shanghai Quartet, returning from last year, and the local debut of the well-known classical guitarist Sharon Isbin, a Grammy-nominated guitarist with some fine ideas on how to expand the guitar literature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're a county resident who has been out of town or in reclusion, you may not have noticed anything special about the Ventura classical music scene this month. For everyone else, the signs are everywhere, literally: The Ventura Chamber Music Festival, now in its sixth annual edition, will consume our attentions and continue a bold lineage. All told, the festival, running through May 14, looks to be a well-balanced display of chamber music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For its sixth annual edition, the laudable Ventura Chamber Music Festival follows up on a proven formula. Over its history, the festival has done well by string quartets and classical guitar. The first official festival weekend, May 5-7, features both the Shanghai Quartet, returning from last year, and the local debut of the well-known classical guitarist Sharon Isbin, a Grammy-nominated guitarist with some fine ideas on how to expand the guitar literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997 | Ken Smith, Ken Smith is a freelance writer based in New York
"The guitar draws a lot of young people to concerts," Sharon Isbin contends with conviction. "It's the instrument that helped lead to the development of jazz, blues and country music. Everyone has grown up with it, in one way or another." She pauses a beat to set up her counterpoint. "The downside is that because it's so well known as an accompanying instrument people don't realize it can be a classical instrument as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
The superb artistry of Sharon Isbin clearly demonstrates that music can be more powerful when it's soft and intimate than when it's loud and grandiose. In recital, Friday night in Ramo Auditorium at Caltech, Pasadena, the Juilliard-based guitarist treated her audience to a diverse, satisfying program that emphasized a rare suppleness and quiet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
Anyone who's heard Sharon Isbin play classical guitar cannot help but note the water-smooth clarity and penetrating intelligence she brings to her music. Isbin, who plays tonight at Occidental College, is never dry in the name of rectitude, never coasts through one part of a piece in order to speed on to a brilliant highlight. Which isn't to say that she doesn't have fun up there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
Guitarists from classical, jazz, country, rock, blues, flamenco and fusion styles will gather in Baltimore in June for "The First World Guitar Congress." The weeklong event will include concerts, recitals, classes, symposiums and exhibits by leading manufacturers of guitar equipment. About 50 musicians will participate, including electric guitar pioneer Les Paul, classical guitarist Sharon Isbin and jazz musician Pat Martino.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1986 | TERRY McQUILKIN
What do you get when you mix three guitarists--a prize-winning classical player, an innovative fusion artist and a pioneering Brazilian master? A virtuosic trio that puts on a program of unusual variety, right? Well, half right. One could hardly doubt the proficiency of the individuals--Sharon Isbin, Larry Coryell and Laurindo Almeida--or of their ensemble, which remained tight and balanced throughout their appearance Saturday evening at Ambassador Auditorium.
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