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Sharon Levy

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September 2, 2007 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
ARTIST Sharon Levy comes across as modest, unassuming, maybe a little shy. She wears her sandy-colored hair in a short, boyish cut, and her clothes, on interview day, are simple, practical: a royal blue knit shirt and navy work pants. Then there are her shoes -- silver, strappy things that defy the rest of her wardrobe, like a riptide of playful flamboyance beneath a calm sea.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Spike TV wants to broaden its appeal, and its answer -- or maybe “manswer” -- is more original, gender-neutral shows. To that end, the network best known for its young male-oriented fare is bolstering its original programming staff, banking on reality series such as “Ink Master,” “Bar Rescue,” and “Tattoo Nightmares.” This also means less emphasis on the dude-centric programming. “The Original Series team's expansion reflects our ever-continuing goal to create distinctive, bold shows geared toward a more gender-balanced audience,” said Sharon Levy, executive vice president of original series at Spike TV.  “We are developing more original series than ever before.”  PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings The network promoted Chris Rantamaki, who helped develop Spike's highest-rated show “Ink Master,” to senior vice president.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Spike TV wants to broaden its appeal, and its answer -- or maybe “manswer” -- is more original, gender-neutral shows. To that end, the network best known for its young male-oriented fare is bolstering its original programming staff, banking on reality series such as “Ink Master,” “Bar Rescue,” and “Tattoo Nightmares.” This also means less emphasis on the dude-centric programming. “The Original Series team's expansion reflects our ever-continuing goal to create distinctive, bold shows geared toward a more gender-balanced audience,” said Sharon Levy, executive vice president of original series at Spike TV.  “We are developing more original series than ever before.”  PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings The network promoted Chris Rantamaki, who helped develop Spike's highest-rated show “Ink Master,” to senior vice president.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2007 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
ARTIST Sharon Levy comes across as modest, unassuming, maybe a little shy. She wears her sandy-colored hair in a short, boyish cut, and her clothes, on interview day, are simple, practical: a royal blue knit shirt and navy work pants. Then there are her shoes -- silver, strappy things that defy the rest of her wardrobe, like a riptide of playful flamboyance beneath a calm sea.
NEWS
July 7, 1988
Delegates of Israel's right-wing Herut Party chose top candidates for November's election, and former Defense Minister Ariel Sharon edged out Deputy Prime Minister David Levy, who was backed by Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. Police guarded the convention site, apparently to prevent clashes among Herut's three camps, headed by Sharon, Levy and Cabinet Minister Moshe Arens. A convention two years ago was aborted after fistfights broke out between party members.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2009 | Associated Press
Barely a day after the daring rescue of an American sea captain, cable TV's Spike announced a deal Monday to produce a show about U.S. Navy pirate hunters. Two crews for 44 Blue Productions hope to be on board Navy vessels patrolling in the pirate-infested waters off the coast of Africa within two weeks. The company is aiming to have a series ready to put on the air by September, said Rasha Drachkovitch, 44 Blue's president and founder. He'd been talking to the Navy about the idea for three months, but it was finished late last week while the standoff with pirates who had taken Capt.
OPINION
June 28, 2012
Re "New wave, new target?," Opinion, June 25 Despite Gregory Rodriguez's excellent points concerning the connection between high socioeconomic status and bigotry, I take issue with his retelling of one writer's simplistic assertion that Jewish philanthropy is motivated "by a desire to defuse envy over the income disparity between the Jewish and Gentile populations. " Generosity is a built-in Jewish value. Every Jewish kid learns of tzedakah - that charity is an obligation.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | Reuters
Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy said Saturday that he will challenge Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir for leadership of the ruling Likud Party. "I believe the time has come to stand up and compete for the leadership of the Likud," Levy told a wildly cheering crowd of supporters in Tel Aviv. Political analysts said it would be the first time the party's three top figures--Levy, Shamir and Housing Minister Ariel Sharon--had fought one another for the leadership.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | From Associated Press
Israel's foreign minister on Wednesday repeated his threat to resign over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's failure to include hard-line veteran Ariel Sharon in his Cabinet. David Levy gave Netanyahu until Tuesday, the day the prime minister leaves for Washington to meet President Clinton, to find a post for Sharon. "If this isn't solved . . . I will give up [my] portfolio," Levy told Netanyahu at a meeting of lawmakers from the governing coalition.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
I was several floors up in a burning high-rise, trapped with hundreds of other panicked co-workers who couldn't find an easy escape. The halls were filling with smoke, as were the stairwells, so I took the only obvious way out. I stepped into an elevator -- and plummeted to a fiery, premature death. Or so it was meant to seem. In truth, I was just acting. I was an extra on the set of an elaborate pyrotechnic simulation that makes up the escape-from-fire episode of a Spike TV show, "Surviving Disaster," that premieres tonight at 10. The latest high-octane infotainment program to hit the testosterone-fueled cable network, "Surviving Disaster" is half reality TV, half scripted narrative -- a program that takes advantage of the country's high anxiety and enthusiasm for preparedness while striving to live up to its name.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2010 | By T. L. Stanley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you're at all squeamish about seeing someone get cash staple-gunned to his privates or 4-foot-tall wrestlers mauling each other while beer-drinking bar patrons egg them on, you might not be the target for the Spike network's new late-night series, "Half Pint Brawlers." But if you're into "Jackass"-style stunts, choreographed grappling matches and pants-dropping spectacles, you may have just found your new appointment viewing. Spike, the testosterone-fueled home of "The Ultimate Fighter," "1,000 Ways to Die" and "Manswers," launches the six-episode show at 11 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When Carolyn Johnson-White steps onto the stage, in her unassuming, churchgoing attire, she looses a voice so rousing that she summons not one, but two heroes back from the dead. Both heroes are Oedipus, as it happens, because the show is "Gospel at Colonus" and Oedipus is played by a singer (Clarence Fountain) and an actor (Roscoe Lee Browne, who also serves as narrator). Whatever.
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