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Sharon Maughan

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1991 | BART MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ad is a beguilingly soft sell. A tall, beautiful Englishwoman knocks on a door to borrow some instant coffee from the dishy man next door. It looks like the beginning of a sexy dramatic encounter, but it ends after just 45 seconds. Several months later, Episode 2 appears. The upscale lady is returning the coffee she borrowed. Electricity again surges across the doorstep. Sadly, the man can't invite her in. He's already enjoying coffee with Another Woman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1991 | BART MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ad is a beguilingly soft sell. A tall, beautiful Englishwoman knocks on a door to borrow some instant coffee from the dishy man next door. It looks like the beginning of a sexy dramatic encounter, but it ends after just 45 seconds. Several months later, Episode 2 appears. The upscale lady is returning the coffee she borrowed. Electricity again surges across the doorstep. Sadly, the man can't invite her in. He's already enjoying coffee with Another Woman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It is like flying against the grain to resist any show that takes on strong feminist views and bolsters them with solid historical fact. So it seems grudging to find the Fountainhead Theatre Company's staging of "Out of Our Fathers' House," a theater piece based on the late Eve Merriam's 1971 "Growing Up Female in America, Ten Lives," a little too quickly and too easily pleased with itself.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | BART MILLS, Bart Mills is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer.
When U.S. television makes political drama, it inevitably focuses on whatever romance the subject might contain, as in the case of the recent "A Woman Called Jackie." British television does the same in "Parnell and the Englishwoman," a four-part series that begins this week on PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre."
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When we last left off, the couple looked out at the Eiffel Tower in their Paris hotel room. As the sun sets, he marvels at the view, and the cup of coffee he's drinking. "Is that all?" she asks. "No," he says. They kiss, and the screen fades to black. That's where the folks at Taster's Choice left viewers hanging. That was six months ago, a lifetime in an era of short-attention spans.
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