Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShasta Dam
IN THE NEWS

Shasta Dam

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2002 | WILLIAM OVEREND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the first thoughts that popped into Doug Latimer's head Sept. 11 was whether he could find someone to take a couple thousand hot dogs off his hands. That morning was supposed to be Shasta County's annual county employees' picnic. Latimer, as chief administrator, was set to be host. But the picnic was quickly canceled, and the hot dogs were sent to a local charity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2004 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The National Marine Fisheries Service issued an opinion Friday that opens the door to increased water exports from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The agency concluded that additional pumping from the delta, as well as changes in dam operations, would not seriously harm endangered or threatened salmon species.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 27, 1988
A state agency has approved a contested plan that would require the federal government to alter management of Shasta Dam to protect a salmon run on the upper Sacramento River. The decision by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board focused on the temperature of water released from Shasta Dam during dry years when water gets above 56 degrees. That is the temperature level that threatens salmon eggs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2002 | WILLIAM OVEREND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the first thoughts that popped into Doug Latimer's head Sept. 11 was whether he could find someone to take a couple thousand hot dogs off his hands. That morning was supposed to be Shasta County's annual county employees' picnic. Latimer, as chief administrator, was set to be host. But the picnic was quickly canceled, and the hot dogs were sent to a local charity.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A toxic green river of pesticide poured into Lake Shasta early Wednesday as scientists carefully tracked the chemical's potential threat to the state's drinking water supply and an army of frustrated officials from a dozen public agencies stood by helplessly, unable to stop the flow or clean up the contamination.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After languishing for more than six months, an "emergency" California drought bill that would provide relief to cities, farmers and wildlife was approved Thursday by the Senate Energy Committee and sent to the Senate floor. The drought relief measure, endorsed unanimously by the energy panel, was hailed as landmark legislation by Sen. John Seymour (R-Calif.), a committee member who said he was "personally proud" of the bill.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
When Shirley Manfredi-Below admires the way Mt. Shasta towers over this little railroad town, she sees a snow-patched peak that is at once familiar and breathtaking, a source of pride and prosperity to the area. That is all fine by the U.S. Geological Survey, but federal scientists also want Manfredi and her neighbors in hamlets around the mountain 250 miles north of Sacramento to see Mt. Shasta as something more--an active volcano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2004 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The National Marine Fisheries Service issued an opinion Friday that opens the door to increased water exports from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The agency concluded that additional pumping from the delta, as well as changes in dam operations, would not seriously harm endangered or threatened salmon species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
When Peter Moyle began studying an obscure little Northern California fish in the early 1970s, he had no inkling of the role it would come to play in the state. No one had paid much attention to the delta smelt. "They were just there," recalled Moyle, then an assistant professor at UC Davis in need of a research topic. "We knew nothing about it. " Nearly four decades later, the delta smelt is arguably the most powerful player in California water. Its movements rule the pumping operations of the state's biggest water projects in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Despite mid-January storms, there is only a 10% chance of a normal runoff of water into the Northern California dams that defend much of the state from drought, the Department of Water Resources said in its latest forecast of runoff expected in the Sacramento River watershed. Most of California's reserve water supply is stored in three large dams on the Sacramento and its tributaries.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After languishing for more than six months, an "emergency" California drought bill that would provide relief to cities, farmers and wildlife was approved Thursday by the Senate Energy Committee and sent to the Senate floor. The drought relief measure, endorsed unanimously by the energy panel, was hailed as landmark legislation by Sen. John Seymour (R-Calif.), a committee member who said he was "personally proud" of the bill.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A toxic green river of pesticide poured into Lake Shasta early Wednesday as scientists carefully tracked the chemical's potential threat to the state's drinking water supply and an army of frustrated officials from a dozen public agencies stood by helplessly, unable to stop the flow or clean up the contamination.
NEWS
October 9, 1989
State water officials have reached agreement on a plan to preserve Sacramento River salmon--a plan that requires congressional support and could take years to put in place. But the compromise would avoid legal entanglements with California's powerful water industry over the operation of dams. If approved, the plan will settle an 18-month-old dispute over the modification of Shasta Dam by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to allow cold water releases favorable for spawning salmon downstream.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
When Shirley Manfredi-Below admires the way Mt. Shasta towers over this little railroad town, she sees a snow-patched peak that is at once familiar and breathtaking, a source of pride and prosperity to the area. That is all fine by the U.S. Geological Survey, but federal scientists also want Manfredi and her neighbors in hamlets around the mountain 250 miles north of Sacramento to see Mt. Shasta as something more--an active volcano.
NEWS
May 26, 1989
Almost two-thirds of winter-run chinook salmon captured for a special spawning run failed to survive, dimming prospects in an already poor spawning season, government wildlife officials reported. Most fish died before they could spawn and none of the 15 surviving fish is mature enough to reproduce, officials said. "The hard thing is that whatever has happened has occurred at a time when--for unknown reasons--there is an unfortunately low run," said Roger Wolcott, a biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|